RECORD: [Shipley, Arthur Everett and James Crawford Simpson eds.] 1909. Darwin centenary: the portraits, prints and writings of Charles Robert Darwin, exhibited at Christ's College, Cambridge 1909 [Cambridge: University Press].

REVISION HISTORY: Scanned by John van Wyhe, transcribed (single key) by AEL Data 9.2012. RN3

NOTE: The copy scanned was kindly photocopied by Carolyn Keim of Christ's College Library.


[front cover]

DARWIN
CENTENARY

1909

[page i]

DARWIN CENTENARY

THE PORTRAITS, PRINTS
AND WRITINGS OF

CHARLES ROBERT DARWIN

EXHIBITED AT
CHRIST'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE
1909

[page ii]

PREFACE

Last year Christ's College celebrated the Tercentenary of our greatest Cambridge poet. This year the University is celebrating the Centenary of our greatest Cambridge Biologist, and the Jubilee of the publication of his most famous Work.

Twelve months ago a collection of portraits and of other memorials connected with John Milton was exhibited in the Old Library of Christ's College. This year the College has attempted to do the same in memory of Charles Darwin. What it is able to show, has, in the main, come from the collections of Charles Darwin's children; two of whom are Members of Lady Margaret's earlier Foundation. The College tenders its thanks to them for the generosity which has placed at its disposal the numerous and interesting objects which are shown. To others, too numerous to mention by name, thanks are due, and especially to the Council of the Linnean Society, who have lent the portrait by the Honourable John Collier; to the University, which by Grace of the Senate has lent the picture of Charles Darwin in his LL.D. robes, by Sir W. B. Richmond; and to Mr Horace Montford, who has sent us the original cast of his statue of Darwin which stands outside the old School at Shrewsbury.

The Exhibition owes much to the help of some of the junior Members of the College, where, to quote Darwin's words, he spent the three years which "were the most joyful of my happy life."

"Those most snug and comfortable rooms," as Darwin called them in a letter to his cousin, W. Darwin Fox, which he occupied whilst in residence, are but a few steps from the entrance to the Old Library, on the first floor, Staircase "G" in the same Court. They will be open to visitors during the afternoon of Wednesday, June 23, and during the morning and afternoon of Thursday, June 24.

A. E. S.

J. C. S.

18 June, 1909.

[page] 1

OUTER ROOM

1. PORTRAIT OF ROBERT DARWIN OF ELSTON AND OF LINCOLN'S INN, BARRISTER-AT-LAW (1682—1754).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Oil painting. A copy of a picture which belongs to Francis Darwin, Esq. of Elston and Creskeld. The original bears the following inscription on the back "Robert Darwin, Esq., supposed to be painted by Richardson about 1717."

This Robert Darwin was the father of Erasmus Darwin, and the following interesting account is taken from Charles Darwin's biography of his grandfather which forms the "preliminary notice" to Ernest Krause's "Erasmus Darwin," London, 1879.

"There is a portrait of him [Robert Darwin] at Elston Hall, and he looks, with his great wig and bands, like a dignified doctor of divinity. He seems to have had some taste for science, for he was an early member of the well-known Spalding Club; and the celebrated antiquary. Dr Stukeley. in 'An account of the almost entire Sceleton of a large animal,' &c., published in the Philosophical Transactions, April and May, 1719, begins his paper as follows:—' Having an account from my friend, Robert Darwin, Esq., of Lincoln's Inn, a Person of Curiosity, of a human Sceleton impressed in Stone, found lately by the Rector of Elston,' &c. Stukeley then speaks of it as a great rarity, 'the like whereof has not been observed before in this island, to my knowledge.' Judging from a sort of litany written by Robert1, and handed down in the family, he was a strong advocate of temperance, which his son ever afterwards so strongly advocated:—

From a morning that doth shine,
From a boy that drinketh wine,
From a wife that talketh Latine,
Good Lord deliver me.

It is suspected that the third line may be accounted for by his wife, the mother of Erasmus, having been a very learned lady."

1Darwin was mistaken, however, in supposing this to be an original Composition. It was only quoted by Robert Darwin.

S. 1

[page] 2

2. PORTRAIT OF WILLIAM DARWIN OF CLEATHAM, LINCOLNSHIRE (1681—1760).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Oil painting, artist unknown. The following note by the present owner of the picture is of interest.

"Reginald Darwin told me that this picture was bought by his father Sir Francis Darwin in 1817, when the pictures at Elston were sold. It was marked on the canvas in very old writing 'William Darwin b. 1655 d. 1682.' But the style of wig and dress are …… those of temp. Geo. II. or perhaps of temp. Geo. I. Hence the identity is mistaken. I take it the portrait is that of William, the son of the foregoing, and have labelled it accordingly. It is impossible to arrive at more than fair probability on this head. The picture was bequeathed to me by Sacheverel Charles Darwin in 1900.

G. H. DARWIN."

May 1900.

William Darwin of Cleatham was the elder brother of Robert Darwin of Elston and the uncle of Erasmus Darwin.

3. PORTRAIT OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1731—1802).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Oil painting by J. Wright of Derby, about 1780.

4. PORTRAIT OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1731—1802).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Oil painting by J. Rawlinson, about 1800?

5. PORTRAIT OF ROBERT WARING DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1766—1848).

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Oil painting by James Pardon, Shrewsbury (unsigned).

This was originally a three-quarter length portrait, but was cut down to its present size about 1870. There is a mezzotint by Thomas Lupton of the picture before it was cut, a print of which is exhibited (No. 81).

[page] 3

Robert Waring, the father of Charles, was the third son of Erasmus Darwin. Like his father he entered the medical profession and took a degree at Leyden University on Feb. 26, 1785.

"He was about 6 feet 2 inches in height, with broad shoulders, and very corpulent, so that he was the largest man whom I ever saw. When he last weighed himself he was 24 stone, but afterwards increased much in weight. His chief mental characteristics were his powers of observation and his sympathy, neither of which have I ever seen exceeded or even equalled. His sympathy was not only with the distresses of others, but in a greater degree with the pleasures of all around him."

"But the most remarkable power which my father possessed was that of reading the characters, and even the thoughts of those whom he saw even for a short time."

CHARLES DARWIN in his autobiographical "Recollections," written in 1877 or 1878.

6. PORTRAIT OF MRS CHARLES DARWIN (1808—1896).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Oil painting by C. Fairfax Murray, about 1886 (signed "C.F.M.").

7. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by the University.

Oil painting by Sir William B. Richmond, K.C.B., R.A., 1879.

After Darwin had received the honorary degree of LL.D. from the University of Cambridge in 1877, a movement was set on foot to obtain some permanent memorial of him in the University, and a meeting was held at which it was decided that this should take the form of a portrait. The sum of £400 having been subscribed, in June 1879 he sat to Mr William Richmond (now Sir William Blake Richmond, K.C.B., R.A.) for this portrait which was afterwards placed in the Library of the Cambridge Philosophical Society.

A copy of the letter circulated after the first meeting in 1877 is exhibited (No. 254).

8. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Oil painting by W. W. Ouless, R.A., Down, 1875.

1—2

[page] 4

Of this portrait, which Mr Francis Darwin considers to be the finest representation of his father that has been produced, Charles Darwin himself, in a letter to Sir J. D. Hooker, wrote: "I look a very venerable, acute, melancholy old dog; whether I really look so I do not know."

A replica by the artist is in the possession of Christ's College and hangs in the Hall. A fine etching, a proof of which is exhibited (No. 97), has been made by Paul Rajon.

9. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Professor T. McKenny Hughes, F.R.S.

Crayon drawing made in? 1853 by Samuel Laurence.

10. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Mrs Litchfield.

Water-colour drawing by George Richmond, 1840 (unsigned).

Inscription on back of Frame "Charles Robert Darwin age 31 March 1840."

11. PORTRAIT OF MRS CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Mrs Litchfield.

Water-colour drawing by George Richmond, 1840 (unsigned).

12. H.M.S. "BEAGLE" IN "JEMMY BUTTON SOUND, TIERRA DEL FUEGO."

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Water-colour drawing by … Martens, Artist on the "Beagle" (unsigned).

13. THE SAND-WALK AT DOWN.

Lent by Mrs Litchfield.

Water-colour drawing by Dickinson, 1882.

"The 'Sand-walk' was a narrow strip of land 1½ acres in extent, with a gravel-walk round it. On one side of it was a broad old shaw with fair-sized oaks in it, which made a sheltered shady walk;

[page] 5

the other side was separated from a neighbouring grass field by a low quickset hedge, over which you could look at what view there was, a quiet little valley losing itself in the upland country towards the edge of the Westerham hill, with hazel coppice and larch wood, the remnants of which was once a large wood, stretching away to the Westerham road. I have heard my father say that the charm of this simple little valley helped to make him settle at Down." (Life and Letters, vol. 1. p. 114.)

14. THE HOUSE AT DOWN.

Lent by Mrs Litchfield.

Water-colour drawing by Miss Julia Wedgwood, 1871.

15. "WITHIN SIGHT OF THE ANDES." The boats of H.M.S. "Beagle," with Captain Fitz-Roy and Charles Darwin, ascending the Santa Cruz River, 1833.

Lent by H. N. Sulivan, Esq. (son of Admiral Sir B. Sulivan, Lieut. on H.M.S. "Beagle").

Water-colour drawing by O. W. Brierly, Naval Artist to H.M. the Queen (unsigned).

16. THE HOUSE AT DOWN.

Lent by Major Leonard Darwin, R.E., Pres. R.G.S.

Water-colour drawing by Albert Goodwin, 1882 (signed "A.G. 82").

17. THE HOUSE AT DOWN.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Water-colour drawing by Albert Goodwin, 1880 (signed "A. Goodwin '80").

The small figures in the verandah are very faithful portraits of Charles Darwin, Mrs Charles Darwin and their grandson Bernard; with the dog Polly.

18. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Coloured chalk drawing by Samuel Laurence, 1853 (signed and dated).

[page] 6

19. PORTRAIT OF MRS CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Sketch in charcoal and colours by C. Fairfax Murray for his painting (No. 19) (signed "C. F. M.").

20. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by the President and Council of the Linnean Society, London.

Oil painting by the Hon. John Collier, R.A., 1881 (signed and dated).

"John Collier (Huxley's son-in-law) told me some time ago that he would dearly like to have you to paint."

A letter from George John Romanes to C. D., May 25, 1881. (Life and Letters of George John Romanes, p. 118. London, 1896.)

"The portrait represents him standing facing the observer in the loose cloak so familiar to those who knew him, and with his slouch hat in his hand. Many of those who knew his face most intimately, think that Mr Collier's picture is the best of the portraits, and in this judgment the sitter himself was inclined to agree. According to my feeling it is not so simple or strong a representation of him as that given by Mr Ouless."

(Life and Letters, vol. 111. p. 223.)

21. PORTRAIT OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1731—1802).

Lent by Miss Darwin.

Coloured mezzotint by J. R. Smith, after the painting by J. Wright of Derby. Published at London, 1797.

22. PORTRAIT OF JOSIAH WEDGWOOD OF ETRURIA (1730—1795).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Oil painting believed to be by Sir Joshua Reynolds (unsigned).

[page] 7

"This picture was, I believe, at Shrewsbury and came thence to Erasmus Alvey Darwin, who believed it to be by Sir Joshua Reynolds. From him it passed to Charles Darwin.

G. H. DARWIN.

March 1900.

Josiah Wedgwood, the grandfather of Charles Darwin and of his wife, was the founder of the famous pottery works at Etruria.

23. MONKEY SAID TO HAVE BEEN LET DOWN IN THE SENATE HOUSE WHEN DARWIN WAS GIVEN THE HONORARY DEGREE OF LL.D. IN 1877.

Lent by W. Spafford, Esq.

24. APPLE SCOOP WHICH BELONGED TO ERASMUS DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

25. TRAVELLING WRITING-CASE WHICH BELONGED TO ERASMUS DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

26. COPPER POWDER-FLASK WHICH BELONGED TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

"In the latter part of my school life I became passionately fond of shooting; I do not believe that any one could have shown more Zeal for the most holy cause than I did for shooting birds. How well I remember killing my first snipe, and my excitement was so great that I had much difficulty in reloading my gun from the trembling of my hands. This taste long continued, and I became a very good shot. When at Cambridge I used to practise throwing up my gun to my shoulder before a looking-glass to see that I threw it up straight. Another and better plan was to get a friend to wave about a lighted candle, and then to fire at it with a cap on the nipple, and if the aim was accurate the little puff of air would blow out the candle. The explosion of the cap caused a sharp crack, and I was told that the tutor of the College remarked, 'What an extraordinary thing it is, Mr Darwin seems to spend hours in cracking a horse-whip in his room, for I often hear the crack when I pass under his windows.'"

(Charles Darwin's Autobiographical "Recollections.")

[page] 8

27. LEATHER SHOT-POUCH WHICH BELONGED TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

28. BULLET-MOULD WHICH BELONGED TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

29. WOODEN BOX MADE FROM THE MAIN CROSS-TREE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE" BY ONE OF DARWIN'S SHIPMATES.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

30. CARD CALENDAR FROM THE STUDY AT DOWN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

31. Two METAL CANTEENS USED BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

32. PAPER CUTTER USED BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Major Leonard Darwin, R.E., Pres. R.G.S.

33. RULER USED BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Major Leonard Darwin, R.E., Pres. R.G.S.

34. SNUFF-JAR USED BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

"He generally took snuff from a jar on the hall table, because having to go this distance for a pinch was a slight check; the clink of the lid of the snuff jar was a very familiar sound. Sometimes when he was in the drawing-room, it would occur to him that the study fire must be burning low, and when some of us offered to see after it, it would turn out that he also wished to get a pinch of snuff."

(Life and Letters, vol. 1. p. 122.)

35. INSECT NET WHICH BELONGED TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

[page] 9

36. GLASS DISH FOR HOLDING ANIMALS USED BY CHARLES DARWIN DURING THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

37. ANEROID USED BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

38. COMPASS USED BY CHARLES DARWIN DURING THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

39. TELESCOPE USED BY CHARLES DARWIN DURING THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

40. SIMPLE MICROSCOPE USED BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

"His natural tendency was to use simple methods and few instruments. The use of the compound microscope has much increased since his youth, and this at the expense of the simple one. It strikes us nowadays as extraordinary that he should have had no compound microscope when he went his Beagle voyage; but in this he followed the advice of Robt. Brown, who was an authority in such matters. He always had a great liking for the simple microscope, and maintained that nowadays it was too much neglected, and that one ought always to see as much as possible with the simple before taking to the compound microscope. In one of his letters he speaks on this point, and remarks that he always suspects the work of a man who never uses the simple microscope."

(Life and Letters, vol. 1. pp. 145, 146.)

41. ARTIFICIAL HORIZON USED BY CHARLES DARWIN DURING THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

[page] 10

42. DISSECTING LENS USED BY CHARLES DARWIN ON THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

43. DISSECTING MICROSCOPE USED BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

"He could dissect well under the simple microscope, but I think it was by dint of his great patience and carefulness. It was characteristic of him that he thought many little bits of skilful dissection something almost superhuman. He used to speak with admiration of the skill with which he saw Newport dissect a humble bee, getting out the nervous system with a few cuts of a fine pair of scissors, held, as my father used to show, with the elbow raised, and in an attitude which certainly would render great steadiness necessary."

(Life and Letters, vol. 1. p. 110.)

44. SIMPLE MICROSCOPE USED BY CHARLES DARWIN DURING THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

45. PART OF BOLAS BROUGHT BACK BY CHARLES DARWIN ON HIS RETURN FROM THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

46. ANEROID BAROMETER FROM THE STUDY AT DOWN.

Lent by Sir Joseph D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., O.M., F.R.S., etc.

47. WET AND DRY BULB THERMOMETER, USED BY CHARLES DARWIN ON THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

48. GEOLOGICAL HAMMER USED DURING THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Probably the hammer with which he killed a rare fox (Canis fulvipes) in South America.

[page] 11

49—51. FISHES COLLECTED DURING THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by Dr Hans Gadow, F.R.S., Strickland Curator, Museum of Zoology, Cambridge.

52. MS. BOOK OF NOTES ON FISHES COLLECTED BY CHARLES DARWIN ON THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE," BY THE REV. LEONARD JENYNS. 1842.

Lent by Dr Hans Gadow, F.R.S., Strickland Curator, Museum of Zoology, Cambridge.

53. FEATHERS OF PEACOCK USED BY CHARLES DARWIN FOR HIS OBSERVATIONS ON THE OCELLI OF BIRDS.

Lent by Dr Hans Gadow, F.R.S., Strickland Curator, Museum of Zoology, Cambridge.

54. FEATHERS USED BY CHARLES DARWIN IN HIS OBSERVATIONS ON DOMESTIC RACES OF FOWLS.

Lent by Dr Hans Gadow, F.R.S., Strickland Curator, Museum of Zoology, Cambridge.

55. BIRDS' SKINS COLLECTED DURING THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE."

Lent by Dr Hans Gadow, F.R.S., Strickland Curator, Museum of Zoology, Cambridge.

"…, a negro lived in Edinburgh, who had travelled with Waterton, and gained his livelihood by stuffing birds, which he did excellently: he gave me lessons for payment, and I used often to sit with him, for he was a very pleasant and intelligent man."

(Charles Darwin's Autobiographical "Recollections.")

[page] 12

INNER ROOM

56. PORTRAIT OF ROBERT WARING DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1766—1848).

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Silhouette.

On the margin is the inscription "Dr Darwin of Shrewsbury. Father of C. Darwin, F.R.S. Copied from a silhouette by — Spence belonging to the Revd W. A. Leigh ton cut in Shrewsbury, 1826."

57. COUNTRY ROAD NEAR DOWN.

Photograph enlarged from a negative by G. W. Smith, Esq.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

58. THE VILLAGE OF DOWN.

Photograph enlarged from a negative by G. W. Smith, Esq.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

59. THE VILLAGE OF DOWN.

Photograph enlarged from a negative by G. W. Smith, Esq.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

60. THE GARDEN AT DOWN.

Photograph by Miss M. J. Shaen.

Lent by Miss Darwin.

61. THE DRAWING-ROOM AT DOWN.

Photograph by W. England.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

[page] 13

62. THE HOUSE AND GARDENS AT DOWN.

Four engravings from Harper's Magazine.

Lent by Mrs Litchfield.

63. THE DINING-ROOM AT DOWN.

Photograph by W. England.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

64. "THE MOUNT," SHREWSBURY.

Photograph taken in 1879.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

"The Mount," Shrewsbury, the birthplace of Charles Darwin, built by his father Robert Waring Darwin, about 1800, is a large plain, square, red-brick house, charmingly placed on the top of a steep bank leading down to the Severn.

It later passed into the possession of the late Spencer Phillips, Esq., during whose tenure this photograph was taken.

65. THE HOUSE AT DOWN.

Photograph.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

"The village stands on solitary upland country, 500 to 600 feet above the sea,—a country with little natural beauty, but possessing a certain charm in the shaws, or straggling strips of wood, capping the chalky banks and looking down upon the quiet ploughed lands of the valleys. The village, of three or four hundred inhabitants, consists of three small streets of cottages meeting in front of the little flint-built church. It is a place where newcomers are seldom seen, and the names occurring far back in the old church registers are still well known in the village. The smock-frock is not yet quite extinct, though chiefly used as a ceremonial dress by the 'bearers' at funerals; but as a boy I remember the purple or green smocks of the men at church."

(F. D. in Life and Letters, vol. 1. p. 320.)

[page] 14

66. THE HOUSE AND GARDENS AT DOWN.

Nine photographs taken about 1883.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

"After several fruitless searches in Surrey and elsewhere, we found this house and purchased it. I was pleased with the diversified appearance of the vegetation proper to a chalk district, and so unlike what I had been accustomed to in the Midland counties; and still more pleased with the extreme quietness and rusticity of the place. It is not, however, quite so retired a place as a writer in a German periodical makes it, who says that my house can be approached only by a mule-track!"

(Charles Darwin in his Autobiographical "Recollections.")

"The house stands a quarter of a mile from the village, and is built, like so many houses of the last century, as near as possible to the road—a narrow lane winding away to the Westerham high-road. In 1842, it was dull and unattractive enough: a square brick building of three storeys, covered with shabby whitewash and hanging tiles. The garden had none of the shrubberies or walls that now give shelter; it was over-looked from the lane, and was open, bleak, and desolate. One of my father's first undertakings was to lower the lane by about two feet, and to build a flint wall along that part of it which bordered the garden. The earth thus excavated was used in making banks and mounds round the lawn: these were planted with evergreens, which now give to the garden its retired and sheltered character.

"The house was made to look neater by being covered with stucco, but the chief improvement effected was the building of a large bow extending up through three storeys. This bow became covered with a tangle of creepers, and pleasantly varied the south side of the house. The drawing-room, with its verandah opening into the garden, as well as the study in which my father worked during the later years of his life, were added at subsequent dates.

"Eighteen acres of land were sold with the house, of which twelve acres on the south side of the house formed a pleasant field, scattered with fair-sized oaks and ashes. From this field a strip was cut off and converted into a kitchen garden, in which the experimental plot of ground was situated, and where the greenhouses were ultimately put up."

(Life and Letters, vol. 1. p. 320.)

[page] 15

"I forget whether I ever described this place: it is a good, very ugly house with 18 acres, situated on a chalk flat, 560 feet above sea. There are peeps of far distant country and the scenery is moderately pretty: its chief merit is its extreme rurality. I think I was never in a more perfectly quiet country. Three miles south of us the great chalk escarpment quite cuts us off from the low country of Kent, and between us and the escarpment there is not a village or gentleman's house, but only great woods and arable fields (the latter in sadly preponderant numbers), so that we are absolutely at the extreme verge of the world. The whole country is intersected by foot-paths; but the surface over the chalk is clayey and sticky, which is the worst feature in our purchase. The dingles and banks often remind me of Cambridgeshire and walks with you to Cherry Hinton, and other places, though the general aspect of the country is very different."

(A letter from C. D. to Mr Fox, March 28, 1843.)

67. THE HOUSE AND GARDENS AT DOWN.

Five wood engravings, from drawings by Alfred Parsons, A.R.A., published in the Century Magazine (Jan. 1883).

Lent by Miss Darwin.

68. THE STUDY AT DOWN.

Photograph by W. England.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

69. BREADSALL PRIORY.

Drawing in Indian ink.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

The drawing bears the inscription: "(Breadsall Priory) from a lithograph, the drawing for which was done by Miss V. Darwin, M… Decr. 6th. 18…."

Breadsall Priory a few miles from the town of Derby was the last home of Dr Erasmus Darwin. Here he died in 1802.

70. THE STUDY AT DOWN.

Photograph by W. England.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

[page] 16

71. CHARLES DARWIN'S ROOMS, CHRIST'S COLLEGE.

Photograph by Scott and Wilkinson.

Lent by Arthur E. Shipley, Esq., F.R.S.

72. CHARLES DARWIN'S ROOM, CHRIST'S COLLEGE.

Photograph by J. Palmer Clark.

Lent by Arthur E. Shipley, Esq., F.R.S.

"Upon the whole the three years which I spent at Cambridge were the most joyful in my happy life; for I was then in excellent health, and almost always in high spirits."

(Charles Darwin in his Autobiographical "Recollections.")

73. CARTOON FROM SIMPLICISSIMUS.

Lent by J. C. Simpson, Esq.

74. CHAIR FROM THE STUDY AT DOWN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

75. PORTRAIT OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D, F.R.S. (1731—1802).

Lent by Miss Wedgwood.

Photograph of the oil painting by Wright of Derby.

76. PORTRAIT OF ELIZABETH (HILL) DARWIN (1702—1797).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Photograph of an oil painting made in 1778, now in the possession of Francis Darwin, Esq., of Elston and Creskeld.

Elizabeth, daughter of John Hill of Sleaford, Lincolnshire, married Robert Darwin of Elston and Lincoln's Inn, whose portrait is shown (No. 1). They had seven children of whom the portraits of two are exhibited: William Alvey (No. 77) and Erasmus (Nos. 3, 4). It is to her that Charles Darwin refers in the last sentence of the passage quoted under No. 1.

[page] 17

INNER ROOM

77. PORTRAIT OF WILLIAM ALVEY DARWIN (1726—1783).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Photograph of oil painting made in 1776 by Wright of Derby, now in the possession of Francis Darwin, Esq., of Elston and Creskeld.

See note to No. 76.

78. PORTRAIT OF JANE (BROWN) DARWIN (1746—1835) WITH HER INFANT SON WILLIAM BROWN DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Photograph of an oil painting made in 1776 by Wright of Derby, now in the possession of Francis Darwin, Esq., of Elston and Creskeld.

The wife and son of William Alvey Darwin (No. 77).

79. PLASTER BUST OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1731—1802).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

80. PORTRAIT OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1731—1802).

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Engraving by J, Heath after the painting by J. Rawlinson.

81. PORTRAIT OF ROBERT WARING DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1766—1848).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Mezzotint by Thomas Lupton, after the painting by James Pardon, Shrewsbury. Published at Shrewsbury and London, 1839. Showing the original appearance of the portrait in No. 5.

82. PORTRAIT OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1731—1802).

Lent by Professor W. Bateson, F.R.S.

Mezzotint by B. Pym after the painting by S. J. Arnold. London, Feb. 2nd, 1801.

S. 2

[page] 18

83. PORTRAIT OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1731 — 1802).

Lent by J. C. Simpson, Esq.

Steel engraving. "Drawn and Engraved by H. Meyer, from a Bronze Bust now in the Possession of Dr Sacheverell Darwin [Sir Francis Sacheverell Darwin]. London, Richard Bentley, 1844."

84. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN AS A BOY WITH HIS SISTER.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph of a small pastel drawing made in 1816 by Sharples, now in the possession of Miss Wedgwood of Leith Hill Place.

85. PORTRAIT OF ERASMUS ALVEY DARWIN (1804—1881).

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Photograph.

86. PORTRAIT OF ERASMUS ALVEY DARWIN (1804—1881).

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph of a small pastel drawing made in 1816 by Sharples, now in the possession of Miss Wedgwood of Leith Hill Place.

87. PORTRAITS OF SEVEN GENERATIONS OF DARWINS.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Photographs from various pictures, most of which are exhibited.

88. PORTRAIT OF ERASMUS ALVEY DARWIN (1804—1881).

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph, 1868.

89. BUST OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Professor Seward, F.R.S., The Botany School.

Marble bust by T. Woolner, R.A., from life, 1869.

[page] 19

90. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Dr Hobson, F.R.S.

Lithograph by T. H. Maguire for the "Ipswich British Association Series." Published in 1849.

91. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Dr F. H. H. Guillemard.

Photograph probably taken about 1854 and given by Charles Darwin to F. D. Dyster, Esq., the microscopist.

92. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph by Major Leonard Darwin, R.E., Pres. R.G.S.,(?) 1874.

This portrait was engraved on wood for the Century Magazine (Jan. 1883).

93. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN ON HIS COB "TOMMY."

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Photograph.

94. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph by the late Mrs Cameron.

95. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by J. C. Simpson, Esq.

Engraving on steel, by C. H. Jeens, from a photograph by O. J. Rejlander taken in 1870 (?).

Published as a supplement to Nature (June 4, 1874).

96. CARTOONS FROM ONCE A WEEK, THE HORNET, AND THE FIGARO.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

2—2

[page] 20

97. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Etching by P. Rajon after the painting by W. Ouless, R.A., 1875.

98. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph by Elliot and Fry, about 1880.

This photograph was taken on the verandah at Down.

99. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Etching by Leopold Flameng after the oil painting by the Hon. John Collier, R.A., 1881 (?).

100. CARTOON FROM LALUNE.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

101. BUST OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Horace Montford, Esq.

Plaster bust by Horace Montford, Esq., Sculptor of the Shrewsbury statue.

102. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Arthur E. Shipley, Esq., F.R.S

Wood engraving by G. Kruell, 1889, after the photograph by Messrs Maull and Fox about 1854.

103. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Professor Adam Sedgwick, F.R.S.

Photograph by the late A. Dew-Smith, Esq., of Trinity College.

104. PORTRAIT OF MRS CHARLES DARWIN KNITTING IN THE DRAWING-ROOM AT DOWN.

Lent by Miss Darwin.

Photograph by Miss M. J. Shaen about 1890 (?).

[page] 21

105. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Arthur E. Shipley, Esq., F.R.S.

Wood engraving by G. Kruell, 1889, after the photograph by Elliot and Fry.

106. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Arthur E. Shipley, Esq., F.R.S.

Photogravure after the photograph by the late Mrs Cameron.

107. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Arthur E. Shipley, Esq., F.R.S.

Photogravure after the photograph by Messrs Maull and Fox, about 1854.

108. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Arthur E. Shipley, Esq., F.R.S.

Photogravure after the portrait by W. Ouless, R.A., 1875.

109. STATUETTE OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Horace Montford, Esq.

Bronze statuette by Horace Montford, Esq., after his statue at Shrewsbury.

110. PORTRAIT OF RICHARD WEDGWOOD OF SPEN GREEN (1701 —1780).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Photograph of an oil painting by George Stubbs in the possession of Miss Wedgwood of Leith Hill Place.

Richard Wedgwood, Cheese factor of Spen Green, was the father of Sarah, wife of Josiah Wedgwood the founder of Etruria.

111. PORTRAIT GROUP OF THE FAMILY OF JOSIAH WEDGWOOD OF ETRURIA.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph of a painting made in 1780 by George Stubbs, now in the possession of Cecil Wedgwood, Esq.

[page] 22

112. PORTRAIT OF JOSIAH WEDGWOOD (1730—1795).

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Engraving after an oil painting by Sir Joshua Reynolds.

Josiah Wedgwood, founder of the famous potteries at Etruria, was the grandfather of Charles Darwin and of his wife.

113. ALBUM PRESENTED TO CHARLES DARWIN ON HIS BIRTHDAY, 1877, BY THE SCIENTISTS OF GERMANY.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

"Among such expressions of regard he valued very highly the two photographic albums received from Germany and Holland on his birthday, 1877. Herr Emil Rade of Münster originated the idea of the German birthday gift, and undertook the necessary arrangements. To him my father wrote

"(February 16, 1877):
"I hope that you will inform the one hundred and fifty-four men of science, including some of the most highly honoured names in the world, how grateful I am for their kindness and generous sympathy in having sent me their photographs on my birthday."

To Professor Haeckel he wrote (February 16, 1877):
"The album has just arrived quite safe. It is most superb1. It is by far the greatest honour which I have ever received, and my satisfaction has been greatly enhanced, by your most kind letter of February 9……. I thank you all from my heart. I have written by this post to Herr Rade, and I hope he will somehow manage to thank all my generous friends."

(Life and Letters, vol. 111. pp. 225, 226.)

114. GUN CASE USED BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

115. ROUND TABLE FROM THE STUDY AT DOWN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

"His dissecting-table was a thick board, let into a window of the study; it was lower than an ordinary table, so that he could

1 The album is magnificently bound and decorated with a beautifully illuminated title-page, the work of an artist, Herr A. Fitger of Bremen, who also contributed the dedicatory poem.

[page] 23

not have worked at it standing; but this, from wishing to save his strength, he would not have done in any case. He sat at his dissecting-table on a curious low stool which had belonged to his father, with a seat revolving on a vertical spindle, and mounted on large castors, so that he could turn easily from side to side. His ordinary tools, &c., were lying about on the table, but besides these a number of odds and ends were kept in a round table full of radiating drawers, and turning on a vertical axis, which stood close by his left side, as he sat at his microscope-table. The drawers were labelled, 'best tools,' 'rough tools,' 'specimens,' 'preparations for specimens,' &c. The most marked peculiarity of the contents of these drawers was the care with which little scraps and almost useless things were preserved; he held the well-known belief, that if you threw a thing away you were sure to want it directly—and so things accumulated.

"If any one had looked at his tools, &c., lying on the table, he would have been struck by an air of simpleness, make-shift, and oddness." (Life and Letters, vol. 1. p. 146.)

116. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Miss Darwin.

Photograph enlarged from a negative by O. J. Rejlander taken about 1870.

117. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Photograph enlarged from a negative by Maull and Fox about 1854

This portrait was engraved on wood for Harper's Magazine Oct. 1884. It forms the frontispiece to vol. 1. of the Life and Letters.

118. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Miss Darwin.

Photograph enlarged from a negative by Major Leonard Darwin, R.E., Pres. R.G.S., taken about 1874.

This portrait was engraved on wood for the Century Magazine, and appeared in that journal in Jan. 1883. It forms the frontispiece to vol II. of the Life and Letters.

[page] 24

119. BUST OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Bronze portrait bust by William Couper of New York, U.S.A., 1909.

This bust has been presented, by the generosity of the United States' Delegates, to Christ's College, Cambridge.

120. DARWIN-WALLACE MEDAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, LONDON.

Lent by Professor A. C. Seward, F.R.S.

121. DARWIN-WALLACE MEDAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, LONDON.

Given by the President and Council of the Linnean Society.

122. WOLLASTON MEDAL OF THE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON. AWARDED TO CHARLES DARWIN, 1859.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

123. COPLEY MEDAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON. AWARDED TO CHARLES DARWIN, NOV. 30TH, 1864.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

"The Copley, being open to all sciences and all the world, is reckoned a great honour; but excepting from several kind letters, such things make little difference to me. It shows, however, that natural selection is making some progress in this country, and that pleases me. The subject, however, is safe in foreign lands."

(Life and Letters, vol. 111. pp. 28, 29.)

124. DARWIN MEDAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

125. BRONZE PLAQUE FROM THE "ACADEMIA DE' LINCEI DI ROMA," 1875.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

126. ROYAL MEDAL. AWARDED BY THE ROYAL SOCIETY TO CHARLES DARWIN, NOVEMBER, 1853.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

[page] 25

127. INSIGNIA OF THE PRUSSIAN ORDER "POUR LE MÉRITE."

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

"In 1867 Charles Darwin received the distinction of being made a Knight of the Prussian Order "Pour le Mérite" which was founded in 1740 by Frederick II. by the re-christening of an "Order of Generosity," founded in 1665. It was at one time strictly military, having been previously both civil and military, and in 1840 the Order was again opened to civilians. The Order consists of thirty members of German extraction, but distinguished foreigners are admitted to a kind of extraordinary membership. Faraday, Herschel, and Thomas Moore have belonged to it in this way."

(Life and Letters, vol. 111. p. 60, note.)

128. BALY MEDAL OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS. AWARDED TO CHARLES DARWIN, 1879.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

129. THE BOTANIC GARDEN, CAMBRIDGE; ABOUT DARWIN'S TIME.

Coloured print, drawn by W. Westall, and engraved by J. Stadler.

Lent by Arthur E. Shipley, Esq., F.R.S.

This and the two succeeding prints are from Ackermann's Cambridge.

130. CHRIST'S COLLEGE FROM THE STREET; ABOUT DARWIN'S TIME.

Coloured print, drawn by W. Westall, engraved by Black.

Lent by Arthur E. Shipley, Esq., F.R.S.

131. CHAPEL OF CHRIST'S COLLEGE; ABOUT DARWIN'S TIME.

Coloured print, drawn by A. Pujin, engraved by J. Stadler.

Lent by Arthur E. Shipley, Esq., F.R.S.

132. PORTRAIT OF SIR JOSEPH D. HOOKER, C.B., G.C.S.I., O.M., &c., &c.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph by the late Mrs Cameron.

[page] 26

This photograph and the print of Sir Charles Lyell (No. 134) used to hang over the chimney-piece in the study at Down. In a letter to Hooker, Darwin wrote:—

"I have got your photograph over my chimney-piece, and like it much; but you look down so sharp on me that I shall never be bold enough to wriggle myself out of any contradiction.

"C. D. to J. D. H.

"Dec. 5 [1868]."

"I have known hardly any man more loveable than Hooker."

(Charles Darwin's Autobiographical "Recollections.")

133. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by the Rev. J. W. Cartmell.

Wood engraving from The Illustrated London News.

134. PORTRAIT OF SIR CHARLES LYELL.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Lithograph.

135. WING FEATHERS OF ARGUS PHEASANT USED BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Dr Hans Gadow, F.R.S., Strickland Curator, Museum of Zoology, Cambridge.

136. CARTOONS FROM PUNCH AND FUN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

137. CARTOONS FROM PUNCH, FUN, LA PETITE LUNE.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

138. PORTRAIT OF THOMAS WEDGWOOD (1771—1805).

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph from a drawing in chalk now in the possession of Miss Wedgwood of Leith Hill Place.

Thomas Wedgwood, the third surviving son of Josiah Wedgwood, and uncle of Charles Darwin and of his wife, after

[page] 27

spending a few terms at Edinburgh University, entered the Etruria potteries, but was soon compelled by bad health to lead a wandering life. He was, to quote the words of Thomas Campbell, a "strange and wonderful being,…full of goodness, benevolence,… a man of wonderful talent, a tact of taste acute beyond description." To him appears to be due the credit of first conceiving the idea of making practical use of the darkening of nitrate and chloride of silver when acted upon by light. Wedgwood showed that a piece of paper, moistened with solutions of these salts, would receive the silhouette of any object whose shadow was thrown upon it. He was unable, however, to fix the prints so obtained, and his invention was therefore of little immediate value.

139. PORTRAIT OF JOSIAH WEDGWOOD OF ETRURIA (1730—1795).

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Steel engraving by P. Condé after the oil painting by Cosway.

See note to No. 112.

140. PORTRAIT OF ELIZABETH (ALLEN) WEDGWOOD (1764—1846).

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph of an oil painting by Romney now at Leith Hill Place.

Elizabeth Allen married Josiah Wedgwood, of Maer Hall, second son of Josiah Wedgwood, founder of Etruria. Their youngest child, Emma, married Charles Darwin.

141. PORTRAIT OF ELIZABETH (ALLEN) WEDGWOOD (1764—1846).

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph of a drawing by Mme. Munier made in 1825.

See note to preceding picture.

142. WEDGWOOD PATENT OF ARMS.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Photograph.

[page] 28

143. STOOL ON CASTORS, USED BY CHARLES DARWIN, FROM THE STUDY AT DOWN.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

144. PHOTOGRAPH OF AN ARGUS PHEASANT SCREEN.

Lent by Dr Hans Gadow, Strickland Curator, Museum of Zoology, Cambridge.

145. CHARLES DARWIN'S WRITING-BOARD.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

On this board was written the Origin of Species.

146. CARICATURE OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

"Natural Selection." Men of the Day, No. 33. Vanity Fair, Sept. 30, 1871. By Pelligrini.

147. OLD PEDIGREE BOOK OF THE DARWIN FAMILY.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

MS. on vellum.

On the inside of the front cover is the name "Dr Darwin" and the note "This book of the Pedigrees was written by my Bror Wm Alvey Darwin," both in the handwriting of Erasmus Darwin. It also contains the fine Chippendale book-plate of "Erasmus Darwin, M.D., F.R.S. Lichfield 1771 "with the motto which he adopted, "E conchis omnia"; and the coat of arms of "Robert Darwin Esqr. of Lincoln's Inn 1717," which has been pasted in subsequently.

148. LATER BOOK-PLATE OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

This copy was printed from the original plate in the possession of the late Mrs Noel of Clanna Falls and given to Sir George Darwin by Reginald Darwin in 1880.

[page] 29

149. MS. NOTE-BOOK.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Contains the Observations of Charles Darwin on his Children. Begun in 1839.

150. VOLUME OF AUTOGRAPH LETTERS OF CHARLES DARWIN TO PROFESSOR HENSLOW, WITH SEVEN OF DARWIN'S SEALS INSET IN COVER.

Lent by the Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

151. CORRECTED PROOF OF THE FERTILIZATION OF ORCHIDS.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

152. MS. AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF CHARLES DARWIN WRITTEN FOR HIS CHILDREN.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

"Aug. 3, 1876. This sketch of my life was begun about May 28th at Hopedene, and since then I have written for nearly an hour on most afternoons."

Most of this MS. has been published in the Life and Letters, vol. 1. ch. 2.

153. MS. NOTE-BOOK "B."

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

On the inside of the front cover is the note, in Charles Darwin's hand-writing, "This book was commenced about July 1837."

In his autobiographical "Recollections" he writes "On March 7th, 1837, I took lodgings in Great Marlborough Street in London, and remained there for nearly two years, until I was married.…… In July I opened my first note-book for facts in relation to the Origin of Species, about which I had long reflected, and never ceased working for the next twenty years."

154. FIRST SKETCH OF DARWIN'S SPECIES THEORY, 1842.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

This MS. is written on both sides of the paper, illustrating what was characteristic of him, "that he felt unable to write with sufficient

[page] 30

want of care if he used his best paper, and thus it was that he wrote on the backs of old proofs or manuscript." The final passage of the MS. is interesting, being almost identical with the concluding words of the Origin.

155. THE ESSAY OF 1844.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

This essay is an expansion of that of 1842 (No. 154). On the Table of Contents is written "This was sketched in 1839." This, however, is almost certainly a mistake (see the introduction to the forthcoming volume, The Foundations of the Origin of Species)

156. VOLUME OF AUTOGRAPH LETTERS FROM CHARLES DARWIN TO JOHN MURRAY, HIS PUBLISHER.

Lent by John Murray, Esq.

157. VOLUME OF AUTOGRAPH LETTERS FROM CHARLES DARWIN TO SIR JOHN LUBBOCK (LORD AVEBURY).

Lent by Lord Avebury.

158. MS. JOURNAL OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

This small pocket journal is dated August 1838. It contains a summary of the chief events of each year of his life up to and including 1881.

159. MS. AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL FRAGMENT WRITTEN BY CHARLES DARWIN, AUGUST, 1838.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

160. MS. JOURNAL KEPT BY CHARLES DARWIN DURING THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE," 1831—1836.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

161. MS. OF INSECTIVOROUS PLANTS.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

[page] 31

162. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM CHARLES DARWIN TO W. DARWIN FOX. WRITTEN WHILE AN UNDERGRADUATE.

From the Library of the College.

163. CLOCK FROM DOWN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

164. PORTRAIT MEDALLION OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Bronze medallion by Allen Wyon.

165. PORTRAIT OF MISS EMMA WEDGWOOD (MRS CHARLES DARWIN).

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Water-colour drawing by Miss Elizabeth Wedgwood, 1829.

166. THE GARDEN AT DOWN.

Lent by Miss Darwin.

Water-colour drawing by Miss Julia Wedgwood.

167—171. AUTOGRAPH LETTERS FROM CHARLES DARWIN TO ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE.

Lent by Sidney C. Cockerell, Esq.

These eight letters were all written to Wallace while he was in the Malay Archipelago. They have all been published with notes by Mr Francis Darwin in the Darwin Centenary Number of the Christ's College Magazine.

172. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM CHARLES KINGSLEY TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Nov. 18, 1859. Acknowledging the receipt of a copy of the Origin of Species. (Life and Letters, vol. 11. p. 287.)

[page] 32

173. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM SIR CHARLES LYELL TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Oct. 3, 1859. After having finished reading the Origin of Species. (Life and Letters, vol. 11. p. 205.)

174. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM SIR JOSEPH HOOKER TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

[Nov. 21, 1859.] Thanking him for a copy of the Origin of Species. (Life and Letters, vol. 11. p. 242.)

175. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM SIR JOSEPH HOOKER TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

[1859.] While reading the Origin of Species. (Life and Letters, vol. 11. p. 242.)

176. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM PROFESSOR ADAM SEDGWICK TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Dec. 24, 1859. Thanking him for a copy of the Origin of Species. (Life and Letters, vol. 11. p. 247.)

177. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM PROFESSOR HUXLEY TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Nov. 23, 1859. Upon finishing the reading of the Origin of Species. (Life and Letters, vol. 11. p. 231.)

178. DRAWING OF ROBERT DARWIN'S HOUSE AT ELSTON.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

"The old house of the late Robt Darwin at Elston in the County of Nottingham, which is in great part rebuilt by his son, R. W. D., Esq., in the year 1756. Copied from an old drawing by Miss Emma Darwin of the Priory near Derby in 1804."

[page] 33

179. THE STUDY AT DOWN.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Etching by Axel Herman Haig. 1882.

Done two or three weeks after the death of Charles Darwin.

180. STATUETTE OF CHARLES DARWIN BY JOSEPH BOEHM, R.A.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Study, about half-size, for the statue in the British Museum (Natural History), South Kensington. 1883.

Purchased at Sir Edgar Boehm's death by the Countess of Derby, and given by her daughter, the Lady Margaret Cecil, to Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B.

181. VERSES ON "DR DARWIN."

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

London: Printed at the "Catnach Press," by W. S. Fortey.

182. BRONZE MEDALLION PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN, BY HORACE MONTFORD.

Lent by Horace Montford, Esq.

183. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Photograph by the late Mrs Cameron.

184. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN AS A BOY, WITH HIS SISTER.

Lent by Miss Wedgwood, of Leith Hill Place.

Pastel drawing made in 1816 by Sharples.

185. AUTOGRAPH LETTERS FROM ALPHEUS HYATT TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

186. LETTER FROM THE MASTERS OF THE COLLEGE OF GREIZ TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

s. 3

[page] 34

187. ALBUM PRESENTED TO CHARLES DARWIN ON HIS 69TH BIRTHDAY BY HIS ADMIRERS IN THE NETHERLANDS.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

188. ONE OF CHARLES DARWIN'S BROWN-PAPER PORTFOLIOS.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

"It has pleased me to find that I have always followed your plan of making notes on separate pieces of paper; I keep several scores of large portfolios, arranged on very thin shelves about two inches apart, fastened to the walls of my study, and each shelf has its proper name or title; and I can thus put at once every memorandum into its proper place."

(Letter of C. D. to A. de Candolle, May 28, 1880.)

189. ABSTRACT OF LYELL'S MANUAL OF GEOLOGY MADE BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

190. MS. OF THE MOVEMENTS AND HABITS OF CLIMBING PLANTS, BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

191. PAGE OF MS. DRAFT OF INSECTIVOROUS PLANTS.

Lent by J. C Simpson, Esq.

192. MS. SCRAPS USED IN CORRECTING THE SIXTH EDITION OF THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

193. PLASTER CAST FOR THE STATUE OF CHARLES DARWIN AT SHREWSBURY.

Lent by the sculptor, Horace Montford, Esq.

194. MS. NOTES OF CHARLES DARWIN WHEN A CHILD.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

[page] 35

195. CALL-OVER LIST USED AT SHREWSBURY GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

"In the summer of 1818 I went to Dr Butler's great school in Shrewsbury, and remained there for seven years, till Midsummer 1825, when I was sixteen years old. I boarded at this school, so that I had the great advantage of living the life of a true schoolboy; but as the distance was hardly more than a mile to my home, I very often ran there in the longer intervals between the callings over and before locking up at night. This, I think, was in many ways advantageous to me by keeping up home affections and interests. I remember in the early part of my school life that I often had to run very quickly to be in time, and from being a fleet runner was generally successful; but when in doubt I prayed earnestly to God to help me, and I well remember that I attributed my success to the prayers and not to my quick running, and marvelled how generally I was aided."

(Charles Darwin's Autobiographical "Recollections.")

196. CHARLES DARWIN'S LECTURE TICKETS; EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

"The instruction at Edinburgh was altogether by lectures, and these were intolerably dull, with the exception of those on chemistry by Hope; but to my mind there are no advantages and many disadvantages in lectures compared with reading. Dr Duncan's lectures on Materia Medica at 8 o'clock on a winter's morning are something fearful to remember. Dr —— made his lectures on human anatomy as dull as he was himself, and the subject disgusted me."

(Charles Darwin's Autobiographical "Recollections.")

"During my second year at Edinburgh I attended——'s lectures on Geology and Zoology, but they were incredibly dull. The sole effect they produced on me was the determination never as long as I lived to read a book on Geology, or in any way to study the science."

(Charles Darwin's Autobiographical "Recollections.")

3—2

[page] 36

197. MS. NOTES MADE BY CHARLES DARWIN WHILE READING PALEY'S EVIDENCES OF CHRISTIANITY.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

"I do not think I hardly ever admired a book more than Paley's Natural Theology. I could almost formerly have said it by heart."

(Letter from C D. to Sir John Lubbock [November 15, 1859].)

"In order to pass the B.A. examination, it was also necessary to get up Paley's Evidences of Christianity, and his Moral Philosophy. This was done in a thorough manner, and I am convinced that I could have written out the whole of the Evidences with perfect correctness, but not of course in the clear language of Paley. The logic of this book and, as I may add, of his Natural Theology, gave me as much delight as did Euclid. The careful study of these works, without attempting to learn any part by rote, was the only part of the academical course which, as I then felt and as I still believe, was of the least use to me in the education of my mind. I did not at that time trouble myself about Paley's premises; and taking these on trust, I was charmed and convinced by the long line of argumentation. By answering well the examination questions in Paley, by doing Euclid well, and by not failing miserably in Classics, I gained a good place among the оι πоλλоι or crowd of men who do not go in for honours."

(Charles Darwin's Autobiographical "Recollections.")

198. MS. OF A PAPER WRITTEN BY CHARLES DARWIN WHILE AT EDINBURGH.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

This paper, written in an artificial style, was evidently for some Society to which Darwin belonged.

199. MS. NOTES ON THE GEOLOGY OF THE COUNTRY NEAR SHREWSBURY MADE BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Undated, but probably about 1831.

[page] 37

200. MS. NOTES ON GEOLOGY BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Undated, but these are probably the notes made on his tour with Sedgwick in North Wales during August, 1831.

See Sedgwick's Life, vol. 1. pp. 377—382.

201. MS. NOTE-BOOKS.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

These pocket note-books were used by Charles Darwin on the voyage of H.M.S. "Beagle."

202. MS. NOTES ON GUNS AND SHOOTING, BY CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

203. MS. NOTE-BOOK, "BOOKS TO BE READ" AND "BOOKS READ." 1838—1851.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

204. MS. NOTE-BOOK, "BOOKS TO BE READ" AND "BOOKS READ." 1852—1860.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

205. AUTOGRAPH LETTER WRITTEN BY PROF. HENSLOW TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Dated Aug. 24, 1831.

"On returning home from my short geological tour in North Wales, I found a letter from Henslow, informing me that Captain Fitz-Roy was willing to give up part of his own cabin to any young man who would volunteer to go with him without pay as naturalist to the Voyage of the Beagle. I have given, as I believe, in my MS. Journal an account of all the circumstances which then occurred; I will here only say that I was instantly eager to accept the offer, but my father strongly objected, adding the words, fortunate for me, 'If you can find any man of common sense who advises you to go I will give my consent.' So I wrote that evening and refused the offer. On the next morning I went to Maer to be

[page] 38

ready for September 1st, and, whilst out shooting, my uncle1 sent for me, offering to drive me over to Shrewsbury and talk with my father, as my uncle thought it would be wise in me to accept the offer. My father always maintained that he was one of the most sensible men in the world, and he at once consented in the kindest manner." (Charles Darwin's Autobiographical "Recollections.")

206. LETTER FROM SIR JOSEPH D. HOOKER TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Letter from Kew [1853], announcing the award of the Royal Medal of the Royal Society of London.

207. LETTER FROM SIR CHARLES LYELL TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

208. LETTER FROM CHARLES DARWIN TO HIS SISTER CATHERINE.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Giving his first impressions of Down.

209. FACSIMILE OF PAGES FROM A MS. "BOOK OF ENTERTAINMENT" BELONGING TO ANNE (WARING) DARWIN OF ELSTON.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

210. FACSIMILE OF MENU OF ERASMUS DARWIN'S CHRISTENING BREAKFAST.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

211. SPEECH OF PUBLIC ORATOR IN PRESENTING CHARLES DARWIN WITH DEGREE OF LL.D. IN THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE. NOV. 17, 1877.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

212. PEDIGREE OF THE FAMILY OF DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Pedigree of the Family of Darwin, compiled by H. Farnham Burke, Esq., F.S.A., Somerset Herald. Privately printed. 60 copies only. 1888. 4°. pp. 23. Frontispiece and nine plates.

1 Josiah Wedgwood.

[page] 39

213. BOOK FROM THE LIBRARY OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1731—1802).

Lent by J. C. Simpson, Esq.

An Essay on the Gout, by Nicholas Robinson, M.D. London [1756]. Containing the Chippendale Book-plate, Autograph and MS. notes of Erasmus Darwin.

214. MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE OF DR DARWIN CHIEFLY DURING HIS RESIDENCE AT LICHFIELD, WITH ANECDOTES OF HIS FRIENDS, AND CRITICISMS ON HIS WRITINGS. BY ANNA SEWARD, LONDON, 1804.

Lent by J. C. Simpson, Esq.

215. ERASMUS DARWIN, BY ERNST KRAUSE. TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN BY W. C. DALLAS.

Lent by J. Stanley Gardiner, Esq., F.R.S.

216. ZOONOMIA; OR, THE LAWS OF ORGANIC LIFE. BY ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S., AUTHOR OF THE BOTANIC GARDEN. LONDON, 1794—1796, 2 vols. 4°.

Lent by J. C. Simpson, Esq.

217. LETTERS TO PROFESSOR HENSLOW DURING THE VOYAGE OF THE "BEAGLE."

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

These letters were addressed to Professor Henslow and were read by him at the meeting of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, held Nov. 16, 1835. 31 pp. 8vo. Privately printed for distribution among the members of the Society.

218. NARRATIVE OF THE SURVEYING VOYAGES OF HIS MAJESTY'S SHIPS "ADVENTURE" AND "BEAGLE," BETWEEN THE YEARS 1826 AND1836. VOL. 111. JOURNAL AND REMARKS. 1832—1836. BY CHARLES DARWIN. LONDON, 1839.

Darwin's own copy.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

[page] 40

219. JOURNAL OF RESEARCHES INTO THE NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY OF THE COUNTRIES VISITED DURING THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. "BEAGLE" ROUND THE WORLD UNDER COMMAND OF CAPT. FITZ-ROY, R.N. BY CHARLES DARWIN, M.A., F.R.S. SECOND EDITION CORRECTED WITH ADDITIONS, LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET. 1845.

(Colonial and Home Library.)

Lent by John Murray, Esq.

220. THE STRUCTURE AND DISTRIBUTION OF CORAL REEFS. BEING THE FIRST PART OF THE GEOLOGY OF THE VOYAGE OF THE "BEAGLE," UNDER THE COMMAND OF CAPT. FITZROY, R.N., DURING THE YEARS 1832 TO 1836. BY CHARLES DARWIN, M.A., F.R.S., F.G.S., NATURALIST TO THE EXPEDITION. PUBLISHED WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE LORDS COMMISSIONERS OF HER MAJESTY'S TREASURY. LONDON: SMITH, ELDER AND CO., 65, CORNHILL, 1842.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

221. A MANUAL OF SCIENTIFIC ENQUIRY; PREPARED FOR THE USE OF HER MAJESTY'S NAVY; AND ADAPTED FOR TRAVELLERS IN GENERAL. EDITED BY SIR JOHN F. W. HERSCHEL, BART. PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE LORDS COMMISSIONERS OF THE ADMIRALTY. LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET, PUBLISHER TO THE ADMIRALTY. 1849.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

222. MEMOIR OF THE REVEREND JOHN STEVENS HENSLOW, M.A., F.L.S., F.G.S., F.C.P.S., LATE RECTOR OF HITCHAM, AND PROFESSOR OF BOTANY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE. BY THE REVEREND LEONARD JENYNS. LONDON, 1862. CONTAINS "RECOLLECTIONS OF PROFESSOR HENSLOW," BY CHARLES DARWIN; pp. 51—55.

Lent by J. C Simpson, Esq.

[page] 41

223. ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES BY MEANS OF NATURAL SELECTION, OR THE PRESERVATION OF FAVOURED RACES IN THE STRUGGLE FOR LIFE. BY CHARLES DARWIN, M.A., FELLOW OF THE ROYAL, GEOLOGICAL, LINNEAN, ETC., SOCIETIES; AUTHOR OF JOURNAL OF RESEARCH DURING H.M.S. "BEAGLE'S" VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD. LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET. 1859.

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Darwin's own copy with his corrections and notes.

224. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM ROBERT WARING DARWIN TO JOSIAH WEDGWOOD OF MAER.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

225. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM JOSIAH WEDGWOOD OF MAER TO ROBERT WARING DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

226. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM MATTHEW BOULTON TO ROBERT WARING DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

227. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM JAMES WATT TO ROBERT WARING DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

228. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM ERASMUS DARWIN TO JOSIAH WEDGWOOD OF ETRURIA.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

229. LETTER FROM LADY ELEANOR BUTLER AND MISS PONSONBY, THE "LADIES OF LLANGOLLEN," TO ROBERT WARING DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

[page] 42

230. AUTOGRAPH ALBUM OF CHARLES DARWIN OF CHRIST CHURCH, OXFORD (1758—1778).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Charles Darwin, the uncle of the great naturalist, was the favourite son of Erasmus Darwin. He died of a dissecting wound.

The album, which is dated Lichfield 1773, contains autographs and inscriptions by Erasmus Darwin, Thomas Day, Anna Seward (1773), Robert Waring Darwin, James Watt (1774), Matthew Boulton.

231. MS. INVENTORY OF THE GOODS AND CHATTELS OF EDMUND WARING, OF WOLVERHAMPTON, ESQUIRE, TAKEN AFTER HIS DECEASE IN 1625.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

This inventory was transcribed and published by Sir George Darwin in the Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries, April 29, 1875.

232. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM ANNA SEWARD TO ROBERT WARING DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

233. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM GEORGIANA, DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE, TO ERASMUS DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

234. MS. VERSES FROM ERASMUS DARWIN TO MISS HOWARD.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Written in the year of their marriage.

"To Miss Howard with Dodsley's Miscellaneous Collection of Poems.

"From these mix'd Lines, my studious Fair shall know
On human Breasts what chequer'd Passions glow:
What trivial Deeds can serious Pains impart,
Or pour soft-eddying Pleasures round ye Heart.

[page] 43

"Here, hostile Shout thy timorous Breast alarms,
As Fancy paints ye Warriors & their Arms;
Bids from ye Field high-plum'd Ambition soar,
Or Tear-less Rapin dip his Sword in Gore.

"Another Page,—no more of hostile Throng,
But smoother Numbers lead ye moral Song:—
Hear sweet Philosophy,—how vain, She sings,
The Voice of Fame, ye Pageantry of Kings:
Bids gentle Chearfulness attend, & throws
The Mask of Folly from her polish'd Brows.

"Next with quick Airs ye comic Muse indites,
Her Step fantastic trips it as She writes,
Joys less sedate ye frolic Eyes display,
And ye light Heart keeps measure to ye Lay.

"But when, anon, ye Love-taught Lute complains,
Soft-warbling forth her sad-impassion'd Strains;
While Nymphs forlorn, & many a Swain distress'd
To soft Compassion sooth thy gentle Breast;
Then, peerless Fair! whom all my Soul approves,
Esteems with Reason, & with Rapture loves,
Indulgent hear thy Poet's honest Plea,
And sometimes give one tender Thought on me.

1757."

235. AUTOGRAPH LETTER FROM MRS CHARLES DARWIN TO HER GRANDCHILD, MISS GWENDOLINE DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

236. PORTRAIT MEDALLION OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1731—1802).

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Wedgwood cameo medallion after the painting by Wright of Derby.

This copy was given by Robert Waring Darwin to Charles Darwin and by him to W. E. Darwin.

[page] 44

237. IVORY SNUFF-BOX WHICH BELONGED TO WILLIAM DARWIN (1655—1682).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

This William Darwin in 1680 married Anne, only daughter of Robert Waring of Wilford, and was the great-great-grandfather of Charles Darwin. Within the box is a slip of paper with the following in Charles Darwin's handwriting— "This box belonged (and probably made by) William Darwin of Cleatham in Lincolnshire who died in 1682."

238. DAGUERREOTYPE OF CHARLES DARWIN WITH HIS SON, WILLIAM.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Taken Aug. 23, 1842.

239. SILVER SNUFF-BOX WHICH BELONGED TO CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

On the inside of cover is the inscription

"E. W. to C. D.
I shall never forget you."

"He had a nice silver snuff-box given him by Mrs Wedgwood of Maer, which he valued much—but he rarely carried it, because it tempted him to take too many pinches." (Life and Letters, vol. 1. p. 122.)

240. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Major Leonard Darwin, R.E., Pres. R.G.S.

Photograph taken by Major Leonard Darwin.

241. REPLICA OF THE MEMORIAL TABLET FOR CHARLES DARWIN'S ROOMS AT CHRIST'S COLLEGE.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

Wedgwood tablet in green and white with the inscription

"CHARLES ROBERT
DARWIN
1828—31"

[page] 45

242. MINIATURE OF SUSANNAH (WEDGWOOD) DARWIN (1765—1817).

Lent by W.E. Darwin, Esq.

Miniature by Peter Paillon, 1793.

Charles Darwin's mother.

243. SILVER CHRISTENING MUG OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

"Christening Mug
of
Charles Robert Darwin.
born at Shrewsbury.
Feb: 12. 1809."

244. PORTRAIT MEDALLION OF JOSIAH WEDGWOOD (1730—1795).

Lent by W. E. Darwin, Esq.

Wedgwood cameo medallion on blue ground modelled by William Hockwood and made at Etruria.

245. SEAL GIVEN BY MRS CARLYLE TO ERASMUS ALVEY DARWIN.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

The following note on the back of the frame is in the handwriting of Mrs Carlyle.

"Head of Goethe. An impression from the locket which I received from himself—done into velvet by me Jane Carlyle anno domini 1837 and presented to Erasmus Darwin Esqr. 'in segno di stima e ricordo di amicizia.'"

246. PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE MEMORIAL TO ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S., IN LICHFIELD CATHEDRAL.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

This memorial was erected in 1887 by Francis Galton, Esq., F.R.S.

[page] 46

247. MINIATURE OF JOSIAH WEDGWOOD OF MAER HALL (1769—1843).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

"I was also attached to and greatly revered my uncle Jos; he was silent and reserved, so as to be a rather awful man; but he sometimes talked openly with me. He was the very type of an upright man, with the clearest judgment. I do not believe that any power on earth could have made him swerve an inch from what he considered the right course. I used to apply to him in my mind the well-known ode of Horace, now forgotten by me, in which the words 'nec vultus tyranni, &c.1,' come in."

(Life and Letters, vol. 1. p. 44.)

248. PHOTOGRAPH OF THE MONKEY LET DOWN IN THE SENATE HOUSE WHEN DARWIN WAS GIVEN THE HONORARY DEGREE OF LL.D. IN 1877.

Lent by Dr John E. Marr, F.R.S.

249. PORTRAIT MEDALLION OF ERASMUS DARWIN, M.D., F.R.S. (1731—1802).

Lent by Mrs Litchfield.

250. MINIATURE OF ELIZABETH (ALLEN) WEDGWOOD (1764—1846).

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

Copy of a miniature by Engelhardt, made by Susannah, wife of Robert Waring Darwin.

251. PHOTOGRAPH OF JOSEPH PARSLOW.

Lent by Sir George H. Darwin, K.C.B., F.R.S.

"I must not omit to mention a member of the household who accompanied him. This was his butler, Joseph Parslow, who remained in the family, a valued friend and servant, for forty

1 Justum et tenacem propositi virum
Non civium ardor prava jubentium,
Non vultus instantis tyranni
Mente quatit solidâ.

[page] 47

years, and became, as Sir Joseph Hooker once remarked to me, 'an integral part of the family, and felt to be such by all visitors at the house.'"

(Life and Letters, vol. 1. p. 318, footnote.)

252. PORTRAIT OF CHARLES DARWIN.

Lent by Horace Darwin, Esq.

Photograph on china from the negative by Major Leonard Darwin.

253. AUTOGRAPH MS. OF ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE'S ADDRESS TO THE LINNEAN SOCIETY AT ITS DARWIN-WALLACE ANNIVERSARY MEETING, JULY 1, 1908.

Lent by Sidney C. Cockerell, Esq.

254. CIRCULAR LETTER ANNOUNCING THE INTENTION TO OPEN A SUBSCRIPTION LIST FOR A "DARWIN MEMORIAL."

Lent by Francis Darwin, Esq., F.R.S.

See note to No. 7.

255. JUBILEE EDITION OF CHARLES DARWIN'S WORKS, IN RUSSIAN.

Lent by Professor K. A. Timiriazeff, Moscow.

256. INSECTS COLLECTED BY CHARLES DARWIN IN TASMANIA AND AUSTRALIA.

Lent by Professor Poulton, F.R.S.

257. PORTRAIT MEDALLION OF CHARLES DARWIN BY W. ROTHENSTEIN.

Lent by the artist.

NOTE. A number of Charles Darwin's Diplomas and Certificates of Membership in various Societies are shown in frames in various parts of the rooms, but are uncatalogued.

Cambridge: Printed at the University Press.


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Citation: John van Wyhe, editor. 2002-. The Complete Work of Charles Darwin Online. (http://darwin-online.org.uk/)

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