RECORD: Anon. 1833. The nautical almanac and astronomical ephemeris for the year 1834. Published by order of The Lords Commisioners of the Admiralty. London: John Murray.

REVISION HISTORY: Transcribed by AEL Data 03.2014. RN1

NOTE: This work formed part of the Beagle library. The Beagle Library project has been generously supported by a Singapore Ministry of Education Academic Research Fund Tier 1 grant and Charles Darwin University and the Charles Darwin University Foundation, Northern Territory, Australia.


[page i]

THE

NAUTICAL ALMANAC

AND

ASTRONOMICAL EPHEMERIS

FOR THE YEAR

1834.

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF

THE LORDS COMMISSIONERS OF THE ADMIRALTY.

London:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES, DUKE STREET, LAMBETH;

AND SOLD BY

JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE - STREET.

1833.

PRICE FIVE SHILLINGS.

[page ii]

[page iii]

PREFACE.

THE NAUTICAL ALMANAC and ASTRONOMICAL EPHEMERIS for the Year 1834, has been constructed in strict conformity with the recommendations of the ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY of LONDON, as contained in their Report to the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, a copy of which is inserted at p. xii; and will, it is believed, be found to contain almost every aid that the Navigator and Astronomer can require.

The several articles contained in this volume are fully explained, and their uses exemplified, at the end of the Work. It is only necessary here to state the Tables which have been used, and the Methods which have been adopted, in the general execution of the Work. Previously, however, it may not be uninteresting to give a brief statement of the Origin and Design of the Nautical Almanac, and its progress up to the present period.

The Nautical Almanac owes its existence to a Memorial presented to the Commissioners of Longitude, on February 9, 1765, by Dr. MASKELYNE; in which, after stating many facts and experiments to prove the utility of the Lunar Method of obtaining the Longitude at Sea, he concludes, "I flatter myself that the facts and experiments here recited will appear sufficiently vouched to you from the certificates and testimonies of the gentlemen who have made these trials; and I am authorized by them to say, that they apprehend that nothing is wanting to make this method generally practicable at Sea but a Nautical Ephemeris,—an assistance which they, with many more, hope for from this Board." The Memorial is given at length in "New and Correct Tables of the Motions of the Sun and Moon. By TOBIAS MAYER. To which is added, the Method of finding the Longitude improved. By the same Author. Published by order of the Commissioners of Longitude. London, 1770." page cxvii.

The following proceedings, consequent upon this Memorial, are extracted from the same Work:—"At a meeting of the Commissioners, appointed by Acts of Parliament for the Discovery of the Longitude at Sea, &c., which was held at the Admiralty, on Saturday, the 9th of February, 1765,

"A Memorial from the Rev. Mr. NEVIL MASKELYNE was read, setting forth to the effect following, viz. [Here the substance of the Memorial recited.]

"The following persons, who were attending by Mr. MASKELYNE'S desire, viz.

Mr. JAMES LAUDER, Chief Mate of the Egmont,
Mr. JAMES STEPHENS, late Sixth of the Speaker,
Mr. ROBERT SCOTT, Third Mate of the Speaker,
Mr. JOHN HORSELY, Fourth Mate of the Glatton,
East India Ships,

were then, at his request, called in separately, and examined as to the utility and practicability of the above-mentioned Observations: they produced their Journals and some abstracts of the results of their Observations, and all agreed in testifying that they had determined the Longitude of their respective ships, from time to time, by Observations

a 2

[page] iv

of the Moon, taken in manner directed by the aforesaid Book,* and found the said Observations easily and exactly to be made; and that the Longitude resulting always agreed with the making of Land (near the time of making the Observations) to 1°; that they could make the Calculations in a few hours, not exceeding four hours; and are of opinion, that if a Nautical Ephemeris were published, this method might be easily and generally practised by Seamen.— They then withdrew. The Board, having taken the matter into consideration, came thereupon to the following Resolution, viz. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Board, upon the Evidence given of the utility of the late Professor MAYER'S Lunar Tables, that it is proper the said Tables should be printed; and that application should be made to Parliament for power to give a sum, not exceeding 5000l., to the widow of the said Professor, as a reward for the said Tables, part of which have been communicated by her since her husband's decease; and also for power to give a reward to persons to compile a Nautical Ephemeris, and for authority to print the same, when compiled, in order to make the said Lunar Tables of general utility."

In pursuance of this Resolution, MAYER'S Widow received a reward of 3000l.; and the celebrated EULER the sum of 300l., for having furnished the Theorems made use of by MAYER in his Theory; and the construction of a Nautical Ephemeris was intrusted to Dr. MASKELYNE.

The first Ephemeris, viz. that for 1767, was published in 1766, since which time the Work has been continued annually. The various Tables which have been employed in its construction, up to the period of Dr. MASKELYNE'S death in 1811, are fully stated in the following extract from his last Preface, dated Sept. 25, 1810.

"MAYER'S Tables of the Sun were used in the Computations of the NAUTICAL ALMANAC, from its first beginning in 1767 to that of 1804, inclusive. From the NAUTICAL ALMANAC of 1767 to that of 1776, both inclusive, or the first ten years, MAYER'S Lunar Tables were made use of. But from the NAUTICAL ALMANAC of 1777 to that of 1788, both inclusive, or the next twelve years, the Moon's Place was inserted as calculated from new Tables, improved from MAYER'S Tables, composed by the late Mr. CHARLES MASON, under my direction, from Calculations made by order of the Board of Longitude upon the Series of Lunar Observations made by the late Dr. BRADLEY, and published in the NAUTICAL ALMANAC of 1774; in which new Tables the Epoch of the Moon's Mean Longitude is 1″ less, that of the Apogee is 56″ less, and that of the Ascending Node 45″ more than in MAYER'S printed Tables, and the Equations are calculated to tenths of a second; and moreover one new Equation is introduced, whose-argument is the Mean Distance of the Moon from the Sun's Apogee, and maximum is 16″·4. But from the NAUTICAL ALMANAC of 1789 to that of 1804, both inclusive, the Moon's Place was inserted as calculated from new Tables still farther corrected by Mr. MASON, entitled by him TABLES of 1780, as having been completed about that time, being rendered more exact than the former by the addition of eight Equations to the number in MAYER'S Tables, taken from MAYER'S Theory as to the Arguments, but settled as to the Maxima from the said Observations, and the whole being calculated to tenths of a second. However, the 18th Equation of these Tables was not used, as it was doubtful whether such an Equation should arise from the Theory of Gravity. Moreover, the Epochs of the Sun's Longitude in MAYER'S Tables, and of the

* [The British Mariner's Guide to the Discovery of the Longitude at Sea and Land, within a Degree, by Observations of the Distance of the Moon from the Sun and Stars, taken with HADLEY'S Quadrant. By Dr. MASKELYNX.—S.]

[page] v

Moon's Longitude and Mean Anomaly contained in MASON'S Tables of 1780, were diminished at the rate of 10″ in a hundred years, reckoned from the year 1756, in the calculations of the NAUTICAL ALMANACS from 1797 to 1804, both inclusive. Also the Longitudes of the Stars, used in computing their distances from the Moon, were carried on from Dr. BRADLEY'S Catalogue of the year 1760, by subtracting 50″·35 from it, for each year between 1756 and 1760, to reduce that Catalogue back to the beginning of 1756, and then adding at the rate of 50″·20 for the Precession of the Equinoxes for each year elapsed after 1756, and applying the Correction of Secular Motion derived from the 44th of the folio Tables annexed to the First Volume of my Astronomical Observations."

"The Calculations of the Planets' Places were made for the EPHEMERIS from 1780* to 1804 by the Tables contained in the Second Edition of M. DE LA LANDE'S Astronomy; and those of the Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites were made from Mr. WARGENTLN'S Tables, which make a part of those Tables; excepting the Eclipses of Jupiter's Second Satellite, which were computed from the EPHEMERIS of 1781 to that of 1804, from new Tables of Mr. WARGENTIN, published at the end of the NAUTICAL ALMANAC of 1779."

"In the year 1792 came out the Third Edition of M. DE LA LANDE'S Astronomy, which he was pleased to make me a present of, containing new Tables of the Sun, Moon, and Planets, and of the Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites. These Tables are constructed upon the best Observations, and upon the Physical Theories of M. LA GRANGE and M. DE LA PLACE, founded upon Sir ISAAC NEWTON'S Principles of Gravity. The Tables of the Sun were constructed by M. DELAMBRE, entirely from my observations; the Tables of the Moon are the same with Mr. CHARLES MASON'S Tables of 1780, only substituting M. DE LA PLACE'S Acceleration instead of MAYER'S, and diminishing the Mean Secular Motion by 23″. The Tables of Mercury, Venus, and Mars were constructed by M. DE LA LANDE. The Tables of Jupiter and Saturn were constructed by M. DELAMBRE from the Theory of M. DE LA PLACE, who has accounted for the great inequalities of their motion to great exactness. The Tables of the Planet Herschel, called the Georgian Planet by us, were also calculated by M. DELAMBRE, according to the method of M. DE LA PLACE'S Theory of Jupiter and Saturn. The Tables for calculating the Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites were constructed by M. DELAMBRE upon M. DE LA PLACE'S elaborate Theory, and agree with observation to surprising exactness. The learned world are much indebted to Mr. CHARLES MASON, M. LA GRANGE, M. DE LA PLACE, M. DE LA LANDE, and M. DELAMBRE, for these valuable improvements in the Astronomical Tables. May I flatter myself, that I also have contributed my share to this great work, by directing Mr. MASON in the improvement of the Lunar Tables by precise rules, and pointing out to him the Equations contained in MAYER'S Theory, though omitted in his Tables, to be ascertained by BRADLEY'S Observations, and by supplying a variety of Observations, from which, in conjunction with others, this great work has been completed?"

"In the year 1806, the French Board of Longitude published further improved Tables of the Sun by M. DELAMBRE; and improved Tables of the Moon by M. BÜRG, founded on M. DE LA PLACE'S Theory, with the Maxima of the Equations stated according to my observations, and the Epochs principally from my observations and Dr. BRALLEY'S. In these, besides M. DE LA PLACE'S other improvements, is introduced a new Equation of the Moon's Longitude, of the long period of 180 years,

*[From 1767 to 1779, both inclusive. Dr. HALLEY'S Planetary Tables were used.—S.]

[page] vi

depending at once on the Moon's Apogee and Node and on the Sun's Apogee, whose Maximum he states at 14″, but of great consequence in settling the Mean Motions of the Moon. M. BÜRG has introduced six new Equations, in addition to eight Equations pointed out by MAYER'S Theory, but whose Maxima had been settled by Mr. MASON, from Dr. BRADLEY'S observations. These Tables had been long expected, and our Board of Longitude had anticipated the important use which they should be applied to in the calculations of the NAUTICAL ALMANAC."

"I was moreover furnished with several copies of the same, by the favour of the French Board of Longitude. These I immediately put into the hands of our Computers; and the publication of the NAUTICAL and ASTRONOMICAL ALMANAC for 1813 came out, for the first time, distinguished with this considerable improvement."

" The Epochs of these Tables having been adapted to the civil reckoning of time, and to the midnight with which the last day of the former year ends, and the new one begins, instead of the noon of the last day of the former year, as generally used in Astronomical Tables, I tried to adopt this method for the NAUTICAL ALMANAC, but afterwards thought it best to relinquish it, and to retain the Astronomical Time, fearing it would be attended with inconvenience, both in keeping the Register of the Greenwich Observations, and in puzzling the sailors by changing the method of using the NAUTICAL ALMANAC."

"The Places of the Planets, and the Times of the Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites, beginning in the year 1805, have been calculated from the Tables annexed to the third edition of M. LA LANDE'S Astronomy, and the Eclipses of the Satellites set down to mean time, instead of apparent time, as formerly."

"The Rev. SAMUEL VINCE, Plumian Professor of Astronomy at Cambridge, having had an early communication of the new French Tables, and of the Errata discovered in them by the comparer of the NAUTICAL ALMANAC and myself, and having also noted several Errata himself, has lately republished them in a neat, elegant, and accurate manner, according to Astronomical Time, together with the Tables of the Planets (taking those of Mars from M. LE FRANCAIS LA LANDE'S Tables in the Connoissance des Tems of the 12th year,) and the Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites from the third edition of M. LA LANDE'S Astronomy. These will be used for the calculations of the NAUTICAL ALMANAC for succeeding years."

"All the Articles of the EPHEMERIS were computed by two separate persons, and examined by a third, except the Moon's Longitude, Latitude, Right Ascension, Declination, Semidiameter, and Parallax, with its Proportional Logarithm, which, for Noon, were computed by one person, and for Midnight by another; and the truth of these Calculations ascertained by means of Differences, which, for the Moon's Longitude, were carried as far as the Fourth Order."

The NAUTICAL ALMANAC for the years 1814 to 1820, both inclusive, appears to have been computed entirely from the Tables in the third volume of Professor VINCE'S Astronomy. BURCKHARDT'S Tables of the Moon, published by the French Board of Longitude at Paris in 1812, were first used instead of BÜRG'S, for the year 1821. In the year 1824, the Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites were deduced from DELAMBRE'S new Tables.* With these two exceptions, VINCE'S Tables continued to be used to the end of the year 1832.

In the NAUTICAL ALMANAC for 1832 are found "Recalculated Elements of DELAMBRE'S new Tables for calculating the Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites, by Mr. HENRY

* Tables Ecliptiques des Satellites de Jupiter, d'après la Théorie de M. le Marquis de Laplace, et la totlité des Observations faites depuis 1662 jusqu'à l'an 1802. Par M.DELAMBRE. Paris. 1817.

[page] vii

JENKINS," as well as a Table of Corrections, founded upon these recalculated Elements, for the Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites in the years 1830, 1931, and 1832.

The Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites for 1833 were computed from Mr. JENKINS'S improved epochs.

VINCE'S Solar Tables were used for 1833, but with corrections deduced from Professor AIRY'S comparison of DELAMBRE'S Tables of the Sun with 1200 observations made with the new Greenwich Transit. In the EPHEMERIS for 1832, corrections derived from the same source were given, to be applied to the Sun's places for 1830, 1831, and 1832.

Various valuable papers chiefly relating to Nautical Astronomy have from time to time been appended to the NAUTICAL ALMANAC; some of which have been republished under the title of "Selections from the Additions that have been occasionally annexed to the NAUTICAL ALMANAC, from its commencement to the year 1812;" (London, 1813,) but with the exception of the introduction of the Apparent Places of 24 principal Stars in the NAUTICAL ALMANAC for 1822, which were increased to 60 in 1827, and Elements for predicting the Occultations of Fixed Stars by the Moon, &c., the contents of the Work, from its commencement in 1767 to 1833 inclusive, appear to have undergone little, if any, variation.

In the year 1830, reference was made by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to the Astronomical Society, to consider if any, and what, improvements could be made in the NAUTICAL ALMANAC. The Council presented their Report upon the subject in November of the same year, which was immediately approved by their Lordships, and ordered to be carried into effect for the year 1834. (See page xii.)

The present volume, besides a few additions, contains every article recommended in the Report, excepting only the periods of the Maximum and Minimum of the Light of the Variable Stars, for which the necessary data could not be procured.

The Ephemeris of the Sun has been computed from CARLINI'S Solar Tables* (assuming Greenwich to be 0h 36m 45″ West of Milan), with Professor BESSEL'S corrections, and the Nutations adopted in the Astronomical Society's Tables. The computations were made independently for every Mean Noon of the Year.

CARLINI'S Tables are founded on the same Elements as those of DELAMBRE published in 1806, and differ only in their arrangement. CARLINI assumes for the unit of each argument its respective daily motion, and by this arrangement gives considerable facilities for the construction of an Ephemeris. For the computation of a single place of the Sun, CARLINI'S Tables possess little, if any, advantage over those of DELAMBRE.

BESSEL'S corrections of CARLINI'S Tables are given in Nos. 133 and 134 of the Astronomische Nachrichten. He adopts BURCKHARDT'S Masses of Venus and Mars, which are less than those of DELAMBRE, the first in the proportion of 1 to 0·8875; the second in the proportion of 1 to 0·95; and a Mass of the Moon =1/83 that of the Earth, which is less than that of DELAMBRE, viz. 1/68, in the proportion of 1 to 0·8: hence the Equations in CARLINI'S Tables IX, XV, and XXVI, require to be each multiplied by 0·8875; those in Tables XI and XVII by 0·95; and the Equations in Tables V, VI, XIV, and XXV by 0·8, according to BESSEL'S rule.

The true Longitude and Radius Vector thus derived, require to be further corrected, on account of BESSEL'S new determination of the Elements of the Solar Tables, from a comparison of his own observations with those of BRADIEY.

* Esposizione di un nuovo metodo di costruire le Tavole Astronomiche Applicato alle Tavole del Sole. Di FRANCISSO CARLINI. Milano. 1810.

[page] viii

If t denote the number of years after 1800, the corrections to be applied to DELAMBRE'S Elements are,

To the Mean Longitude + 2″·65 + t. 0″·144477
To the Longitude of the Perigee + 64″·99 - t. 0″·41015
To the Excentricity -0·0000024625 – t. 0·00000001786.

The corrections of the True Longitude, and Radius Vector, depending upon these alterations, are of the form a + b t and a′ + bt, and those Values of the Co-efficients a, b, a′, b′ have been adopted, which are given in BESSEL'S Table IV.

By the advice of Professor AIRY, BESSEL'S corrections have been adopted in preference to his own, because they are exhibited in printed Tables, and can be referred to; and this principle has been acted upon generally throughout the Work, preference having, in all possible cases, been given to printed authorities.

The results of a comparison of the corrected Tables with Observations, may be seen in Nos. 172, 179, and 217 of the Astronomische Nachrichten.

As the Apparent Places of the 100 Stars were directed to be founded upon the Nutations used in the Astronomical Society's Tables, the same Nutations have been adopted for the Sun, Moon, and Planets throughout this Work, in preference to those of BESSEL, for the sake of consistency.

The Lunar and Solar Nutations, in Longitude and the Apparent Obliquity of the Ecliptic, have been deduced from BAILY'S Tables XXI and XXII, in the formation of which the Constants used are those of the Astronomical Society's Tables. (Astronomical Tables and Formulœ. By FRANCIS BAILY. London, 1827.)

If we denote the several Equations which enter into the Sun's Longitude, Latitude, and the Radius Vector, by the numbers of CARLINI'S Tables, the results given in this Ephemeris, for Mean Noon, are as follow:

Sun's Longitude = II + III + IV + 0·8 (V+VI) + VIII + 0·8875 (IX) + X + 0·95 (XI) + XII + Nutations + a + b (t–1800)
Sun's Latitude = 0·8 (XXV) + 0·8875 (XXVI) + XXVII
Log. Radius Vector = XIII + 0·8 (XIV) + 0·8875 (XV) + XVI + 0·95 (XVII) + XVIII + a′ + b′ (t–1800)

The Semidiameter of the Sun, at the Earth's Mean Distance, has been taken = 16′ 0″·9, as determined by BESSEL, from 1698 transits, in which both limbs had been observed at Königsberg, between the Years 1820 and 1828, with REICHENBACH'S meridian circle. (BESSEL Tab. Reg. page L.)

The Sidereal Time of the Sun's Semidiameter passing the Meridian has been obtained from Table XII. of BESSEL'S Tab. Reg.

The Equatorial Horizontal Parallax of the Sun, at the Earth's Mean Distance, is = 8″·5776, as deduced by Professor ENCKE, from the Transits of Venus, in 1761 and 1769. (Der Venusdurchgang von 1769, &c. Gotha, 1824. Page 108.)

The Constant of Aberration = 20″·36. (Preface to Ast. Soc. Cat. page x.)

*The Sidereal Time, at Mean Noon = Sun's Mean Longitude + Nutations/15. According to BESSEL (Tab. Reg. page XXIV.), the Mean Longitude of the Sun, at Paris Mean Noon, of January 0d of the year 1800 + t is

279° 54′ 1″·36 + t. 27″·605844 + t2. 0″·0001221805 – f. 14′ 47″·083, where f denotes, for the 19th century, the number of years from the preceding bissextile year. Assuming the Meridian of Greenwich to be 9m 21·6 West of that of Paris, and altering the epoch to the Mean Noon of January 1 of the year 1800 + l, the Sun's Mean Longitude (M) for the meridian of Greenwich is found equal to

[page] ix

280° 53′ 32″·75 + t. 27″·605844 + t2. 0″·0001221805 – f. 14′ 47″·083, and we have for the Mean Noon of any day (n) of the year 1800 + t,

Sidereal Time = M/15 + n. 3m 56″·555348 + Nutations in R. A.

The Mean Obliquity of the Ecliptic has been taken = 23° 27′ 39″·26, for January 1, 1834, and the Mean Annual diminution = 0″·457. (BESSEL, Tab. Reg. page 9.)

The Places of the Moon have been derived from BURCKHARDT'S Tables de la Lune, (Paris, 1812), with a difference of Meridians = 9m 21″, and the Nutations of the Astronomical Society. They have been computed independently for every Mean Noon and Midnight of the Year; and wherever the variation of the Equations appeared to render such a correction necessary, second differences have been taken into account.

An Ephemeris of the Moon for the year 1834, calculated upon the Tables of M. LE BARON DAMOISEAU, has been published by Professor SCHUMACHER with his Ephemeris of Planetary Lunar Distances. Astronomers will thus be enabled to put the merits of the Tables of BURCKHARDT and DAMOISEAU to the strict test of observation.

All the Calculations relating to the Planets Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the Georgian, have been performed under the direction of Professor SCHUMACHER, of Altona; and those for the Minor Planets under the direction of Professor ENCKE.

The Geocentric, as well as the Heliocentric Positions, are reckoned from the true Equinox; the former are affected by aberration, and immediately comparable with instrumental results.

The Places of Mercury, Venus, and Mars, have been derived from LINDENAU'S Tables* of those Planets, assuming Greenwich to be 42m 56″ West of Seeberg.

Jupiter, Saturn, and the Georgian, have been computed from the new Tables of BOUVARD.†

The Semidiameters of the Planets at the Mean Distance of the Earth from the Sun, have been assumed as follow, viz. that of Mercury 3″·23; Venus 8″·25; Mars 4″·57; Jupiter 93″·37; Saturn 88″·72; and that of the Georgian 37″·20.

The Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites have been computed from DELAMBRE'S new Tables, as before, using the corrected epochs given in the Nautical Almanac for 1832.

The Configurations of the Satellites were deduced from the Tables of DELAMBRE given in the Conn. des Tems for 1808, using however, in all cases, the computed geocentric conjunctions and the mean daily motions of the Satellites derived therefrom.

The Latitude of the fourth Satellite of Jupiter exceeds the semidiameter of the planet at every conjunction in the year 1834; consequently the Satellite can neither be occulted by, nor pass over the disc of, the planet. When therefore either of these

* Incesligatio nova Orbitœ a Mercurio circa Solem descriptœ, accedunt Tabulœ Planetœ ex Elementis recens repertis et Theoria Gravitatis Illust. De Laplace construclœ. Auctore BERNHARDO DE LINDENAU. Gothæ, 1813 4to.
Tabulœ Veneris norœ et correctœ ex Theoria Gravitatis clarissimi De Laplace et ex Observationibus recentissimis in specula Astronomica Seebergenci habitis erulœ. Auctore BERNHARDO DE LINDENAU. Gothæ, 1810. 4to.
Tabulœ Martis norœ ey correctœ ex Theoria Gravitatis clarissimi De Laplace et ex Observationibus recentissimis erutœ. Auctore BERNHARDO DE LINDENAU. Eisenberg. 1811.4to.

Tables Asatronomiques publiées par le Bureau des Logitudes France contenant les Tables de Jupiter, de Saturne et d'Uranus, construites d'après la Théorie de la Méchanique Céleste: par M. A. BOCVARD. Paris, 1821.

[page] x

phenomena is indicated in the Tables of Configurations, it is to be understood that the Satellite is above or below the planet.

The Occultations and Transits of the Satellites have been computed with the aid of the Tables given in the Berlin Ephemeris for 1834. The portion of the projected Orbit of each Satellite intercepted by the Disc of Jupiter has been deduced by assuming the compression of the Planet = 1/14.

The Transits of the Shadows of the Satellites over the Disc of Jupiter have been deduced from the following formulæ: The Mean Times of the Immersion and Emersion at the preceding Eclipse being denoted respectively by Ip and Ep, and those at the following Eclipse by If and Ef.

Mean Time of Ingress = Ip + If/2 + correction.

Mean Time of Egress =Ep + Ef/2 + correction.

The correction depends upon the irregular motion of some of the principal Equations involved in the computation of the Eclipses, and has been taken from MS. Tables, for each Satellite, constructed by the late Mr. HENRY JENKINS.

With regard to the Catalogue of the 100 Fixed Stars, the only necessary addition to the explanation given at pages 366, 367, is that the Mean Places furnished by Mr. POND are the result of his latest determinations.

The Moon-Culminating Stars were selected by Mr. FRANCIS BAILY.

The Mean Places of the Stars for this List, as well as those for the Occultations, have been taken in order of preference, 1. From the Catalogue of the 100 Stars in this Book. 2. From Mr. POND'S printed Catalogue of 720 Stars. 3. From the Astronomical Society's Catalogue. The reduction of the Mean to the Apparent Places has been performed by means of the Constants given in the last Catalogue.

The duplicate computations of the Elements of Occultations were performed gratuitously by Mr. MACLEAR of Biggleswade.

The Tides at London Bridge are derived from Tables calculated by Mr. DESSIOU, under the direction of Mr. LUBBOCK. These Tables were originally founded upon a mass of Observations made at the London Docks, which Mr. LUBBOCK has discussed in a paper, printed in the Phil. Trans, for 1831. In this paper Mr. LUBBOCK had confined his attention to the Observations made between New and Full Moon: and it would appear, from a comparison of the results deduced from his Tables with Observations made at the London Docks in the months of January, February, and March, 1832 (Phil. Trans. for 1832), that considerable discrepancies existed between the predicted and the observed Tides. Mr. DESSIOU has corrected his former Tables, by incorporating the results derived from about 6000 additional Observations with the previous results, and these corrected Tables have been adopted.

The Tables for finding the Latitude of a place by observations of the Pole Star (α Ursæ Minoris), at any hour of the day, are similar to those published annually by Professor SCHUMACHER, in his Ephemeris of the planetary distances, and are founded on the following formula:

l = a – p cos h + 1/2 sin 1″ (p sin h)2 tan a where l denotes the latitude

a — the true altitude of the Star

p — the apparent polar distance, expressed in seconds of arc

h — the horary angle of the Star = S – α; S being the sidereal time of observation, and α the right ascension of the Star.

[page] xi

Table I contains the value of the second term, (p cos h) or the first correction; assuming, as mean values, p = 94′ 30″, and α = 15° 10′.

Table II contains the value of the third term, (1/2 sin 1″ (p sin h)2 tan α) or the second correction, using the same mean quantities as in Table I.

Table III contains the third correction, which is special for the year 1834; and depends upon the difference between the true and assumed values of p and α.

A fourth term (–1/3 sin2 1″ (p cos h) (p sin h)2) has been omitted, its greatest value being only 0″·55.

The whole of the Computations, those of the Planets only excepted, have been made in duplicate, and the results compared by a third person. Independent calculations have subsequently been made as a check upon each of the Computers, and the results finally examined by means of Differences. The Places of the Planets have likewise been verified by independent calculations, and by means of differences.

The Places of the Sun were computed by Messrs. FARLEY and RUSSELL, under the superintendence of the Rev. RICHARD SHEEPSHANKS, to whose zeal and ability I am ou this, as on every other occasion, greatly indebted. The places of the Moon are the production of various computers but the careful comparison and minute examination of the duplicate computations have been conducted by Messrs. ALGER and MIDDLEMIST, whose patience and fidelity in the execution of this most tedious task, it is impossible too highly to appreciate. All the calculations relating to the Occultations and Transits of Jupiter's Satellites were performed under the direction of Mr. WOOLHOUSE, who has composed a complete set of Tables for determining these Phenomena, as well as the Configurations and Transits of the Shadows, with greater facility and accuracy than has hitherto been attempted. These Tables will be published with the Nautical Almanac for 1835. The Eclipses of the Sun and Moon were likewise executed by Mr. WOOLHOUSE, assisted by Mr. GODWARD.

The calculations of the Lunar Distances have been superintended by Mr. FARLEY: The examination of the calculations generally has also been performed by Mr. FARLEY, in conjunction with Mr. GODWARD. The final test by means of differences, has, in all cases whatever, been entrusted to Mr. WOOLHOUSE.

With respect to the Type, a new cast of Figure has been made expressly for this Work, wherein the uniform size of the Figures, which has been adopted for many years past, has been abandoned; and the old system revived of giving the Figures 6, 7, 9, a greater length than the rest; whereby it is hoped that the tabular values will be more distinct and legible, and less liable to cause confusion.

The present work affords a good specimen of what may be accomplished in the way of printing by steam: 7,000 impressions of the work have been taken, and in every case, the first, the middle, and the last impression, have been carefully compared with the press sheet, and in two instances only were the slightest variations detected. It is due to Mr. CLOWES to state, that he has spared neither expense nor exertion to facilitate the progress of this National Work through the press.

Nautical Almanac Office, Somerset House,

July 19, 1833.

W. S. STRATFORD, Lieut. R.N.,

Superintendent of the Nautical Almanae.

*** The Nautical Almanac for 1835 is now in the Press, and will be published before the end of the present Year: that for 1836 will immediately follow, and the Press will now be kept in constant action until the Work shall be FOUR YEARS in advance.

[page xii]

REPORT

OF

THE COMMITTEE OF THE ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON,

Relative to the Improvement of the Nautical Almanac: adopted by the Council, November 19, 1830; approved by the Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, and ordered by them to be carried into effect.

NAMES OF THE COMMITTEE.

*Professor Airy.

Right Hon. Lord Ashley.

*C. Babbage, Esq.

*F. Baily, Esq.

P. Barlow, Esq.

*Capt. F. Beaufort, R.N.

Capt. F. W. Beechey, R.N.

Lieut.-Gen. Sir T. M. Brisbane, K.C.B.

Right Rev. Bishop of Cloyne.

Lieut.-Colonel Colby, R.E.

A. De Morgan, Esq.

Hon. Capt. Dundas, R.N.

Davies Gilbert, Esq, P.R.S.

Dr. Gregory.

Capt. Basil Hall, R.N.

Professor Hamilton.

T. Henderson, Esq.

* J. F. W. Herschel, Esq.

Capt. Heywood, R.N.

Capt. James Horsburgh.

Rev. Dr. Inman.

Capt. Kater.

Dr. Lee.

J. W. Lubbock, Esq.

T. Maclear, Esq.

Rev. G. Peacock.

Rev. Dr. Pearson.

* J. Pond, Esq.

E. Riddle, Esq.

Professor Rigaud.

*Rev. Dr. Robinson.

Rev. R. Sheepshanks.

Capt. Shireff, R.N.

Capt. W. H. Smyth, R.N.

*Sir James South, President.

* Lieut. W. S. Stratford, R.N.

*Professor Struve.

Dr. Tiarks.

E. Troughton, Esq.

J. Wrottesley, Esq.

N. B.—Those Members, to chose names an asterisk is prefixed, formed the Sub-Committee.

ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON.

The COMMITTEE appointed by the COUNCIL of the ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY to take into consideration the Letter addressed to them by the Right Honourable the LORDS COMMISSIONERS of ADMIRALTY, relative to the improvement of NAUTICAL ALMANAC, have agreed on the following

REPORT.

1. The attention of the Committee was, in the first instance, directed to a subject of general importance, as affecting almost all the results in the Nautical Almanac; viz., whether the quantities therein inserted should in future be given for apparent time (as heretofore), or for mean solar time. Considering that the latter is the most convenient, not only for every purpose of Astronomy, but also (from the best information they have been able to obtain) for all the purposes of Navigation; at the same time that it is less laborious to the computer, and has already been introduced with good effect into the national Ephemerides of Coimbra and Berlin, the Committee recommend the abolition of the use of apparent time in all the computations of the Nautical Almanac; excepting only the place, &c. of the sun at the time of his transit over the meridian, which must necessarily be computed for the time of apparent noon; but which, by the arrangement proposed in the accompanying Specimen (and which the Committee request may be considered as part of this Report), can never be mistaken for his place as computed for mean noon. The Committee are aware that in recommending this important change in the mode of reckoning time, in all computations connected with nautical astronomy, it may appear to some persons that a temporary inconvenience may be experienced: they trust, however, that, upon more mature consideration, this will be found not likely to take place. It is true that, when the Nautical Almanac was first formed, apparent time was the only mode of reckoning that could be properly introduced; as the seaman had no other method of obtaining his time than by observations of the sun; nor any other mode of carrying it on from day to day than by ordinary watches. Other modes, however, are now resorted to for obtaining the time; and the great perfection of chronometers and

[page] xiii

their extensive use in the sea service have led to the more general use and adoption of mean time; which has now become easy and familiar in many of the most common nautical problems, and equally convenient in all. Moreover the Committee are of opinion that there is a great advantage in assimilating the practical operations in nautical astronomy with those pursued in the observatory; with which in fact they become identified, the moment the navigator commences the requisite observations on shore in order to verify the rate of his chronometers, or to determine the accurate position of his place. This change has indeed, for many years past, been made in the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites: and, from the necessary use, in many cases, of astronomical problems, must sooner or later be more generally introduced: and no time appears so well adapted for such an alteration as the present, when a general revision of the work is in contemplation. And should this alteration be adopted, the Committee recommend that the words MEAN TIME be inserted at the head of every page where it may be applicable, in order that the seaman may be constantly apprized of the change which has been made.

2. The next point of consideration was of minor importance, and of a less general nature; via. the proposal to abolish the use of signs, as indicating arcs of 30° in the division of the circle. With the view therefore of preserving uniformity in the arrangement of the values in the Nautical Almanac, and considering it in most cases more convenient in practice, the Committee recommend that the use of signs should be abolished also, and that the degrees should in all cases be reckoned from 0 to 360.

3. The Committee having before them a printed specimen of the monthly arrangements of the articles forming the Nautical Almanac for the year 1833, forwarded to the Council by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, and also having before them a copy of the Nautical Almanac and of the Supplement for the present year (1830), next proceeded to examine and discuss seriatim the various parts into which the work is divided: and, having agreed on certain preliminary arrangements, appointed a Sub-Committee to examine them more in detail, as well as to examine and digest the various hints and suggestions which had been forwarded to them, not only by members of their own body who were unable to attend the meetings, but likewise by other correspondents, relative to this subject. The Sub-Committee having made a report of their labours, it was ordered to be printed; and a copy of the same having been forwarded to each member of the Committee, a distant day was appointed for their taking the same into consideration: by which means every opportunity and facility have been afforded for the most ample and open discussion of the several points in question. The final result of their deliberations will be seen from the following summary of the alterations and additions proposed and recommended; and also from the Appendix to this Report, which contains a synoptical view of all the articles proposed to be inserted in the Nautical Almanac.

4. And here perhaps it may be proper to remark, that, although in these discussions the Committee have constantly kept in view the principal object for which the Nautical Almanac was originally formed, viz., the promotion and advancement of nautical astronomy, they have not been unmindful that, by a very slight extension of the computations, and by a few additional articles (of no great expense or labour), the work might be rendered equally useful for all the purposes of practical astronomy. For the Committee cannot omit this opportunity of expressing their decided opinion, that it is not by the mere helps with which the seaman is furnished for the purpose of determining the position of his vessel at sea, that the full intent and purpose of what is usually called nautical astronomy are answered; since this object is a part only of that comprehensive and important subject, and may be effected by a very cheap publication, and without the use of very expensive instruments. An equally important and more difficult portion of it consists in the exact determination of the position of various interesting points on the surface of the earth (equally essential and almost solely applied to the purposes of navigation),—such as remarkable headlands, ports, and islands; together with the general trending of the sea-coast between well-known harbours,—and which may properly be designated by the name of nautical geography: this can only be effectually and properly executed by methods not available on board a ship, and by delicate instruments placed firmly on solid ground. And the observer in uch cases requires all the astronomical aid which can be afforded him from the best tables, arranged in the most convenient form for immediate use. This was evidently Dr. Maskelyne's view of the subject, when he first proposed the formation of the Nautical Almanac, as appears from his "Explanation and Use of the Articles" annexed to that work: and the propriety and accuracy of his opinion have been confirmed by the repeated wants and demands of those distinguished navigators

[page] xiv

who have been employed in several recent scientific expeditions. There are moreover many individuals in various parts of the world, attached to the science of astronomy, who by the encouragement and facilities thus given, render considerable assistance to the improvement of astronomy and geography by their exertions: and neither private nor national observatories, on which many thousands are annually expended, can proceed with activity or good effect, unless some aid of this kind is afforded them.

5. Impressed with these considerations, the Committee proceeded to the discussion of the subjects in question. And although, in the course of this investigation, some objects of minor importance have presented themselves, the Committee have not thought them unworthy their attention: since they considered it desirable that as perfect an arrangement and disposition as possible of all the parts should be effected at one and the same time, not only in order to avoid the frequency of alterations, which must in all cases be attended with inconvenience and disadvantage, but more especially that the work may at once appear in its most approved form, and thus more decidedly mark the epoch of the alterations that have been introduced.

6. To the class of minor subjects above mentioned belong the arrangement of the calendar, and the various articles which usually occupy the first page of each month. The Committee will advert more at large to this subject in the sequel; and at present merely observe that they recommend the abolition of the column entitled "Sundays and other remarkable days:" and a partial suppression, accompanied with a totally new arrangement, of the column entitled "Other phenomena;" in order to make room for more important matter.

7. With respect to the other more essential parts of the Almanac (in the order in which they stand) the Committee recommend that the computations of the Sun's longitude, right ascension and declination, together with the equation of time (the three latter computed for apparent noon, as well as mean noon), should be extended to one place of decimals further than in the printed specimen for 1833 above alluded to: that the hourly difference in right ascension be added, and that the hourly difference in declination and in the equation of time be substituted for the daily difference. And they suggest the propriety of having a running correction at the bottom of the page, for converting (from sidereal to mean time) the interval of the time in which the sun's semidiameter passes the meridian. They also recommend an additional column, containing the "Mean solar time of the transit of the first point of Aries," calculated to 2 places of decimals: together with a column containing the fractional part of a year, for every day in the year, to 3 places of decimals: as well as the retention of the column containing the days of the year in numerical order from Jan. 1 to Decem. 31. On the other hand they recommend the suppression of 1 place of decimals in the sun's semidiameter, as the values would then be sufficiently exact for every purpose required: also the suppression of the time of the rising and setting of the sun and moon, as being for the most part wholly useless to the navigator, and of no essential service to the astronomer.

8. They farther recommend that the computations of the Moon's longitude, latitude, declination, equatorial horizontal parallax, horizontal semidiameter, age, and time of passing the meridian, be extended to 1 place of decimals farther than in the before-mentioned specimen: and that the time of the moon's perigee and apogee, to the nearest hour, be inserted at the foot of one of the pages. "Whilst on the subject of the moon's place, the Committee cannot omit the opportunity of expressing their great approbation of the introduction, by Mr. Pond, of the right ascension and declination of the moon for every third hour into the Nautical Almanac for 1833; a measure which affords accuracy and convenience to the mariner on many occasions. The Committee have had much discussion on the propriety and advantage of extending those places still further to every hour: and, considering the very extensive use to which they may be practically applied in various parts of nautical astronomy, they have finally decided to recommend that important addition; as well as a column containing the differences of declination for 5 minutes, if it can be conveniently introduced.

9. The attention of the Committee was next called to the form in which the positions of the Planets are given in the printed specimen above alluded to, which they consider to be too much abridged to be of any essential service either to the astronomer or the navigator. The Committee are aware that the positions of the four principal planets (Venus Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn) for every day in the year, are annually published in English,

[page] xv

and partly at the expense of this government, by the Royal Danish Sea-Chart Office at Copenhagen; together with the distances of those planets from the moon, for every third hour; under the direction of Professor SCHUMACHER. But, notwithstanding the ability with which that work is conducted, the Committee are of opinion that it is not so generally diffused in the Navy as its merits deserve; arising probably from its not being sufficiently known. And as there can be no question, at the present day, about its utility and importance to navigation; and as every method ought to be encouraged and promoted that will tend to assist the mariner in determining the position of his vessel at all times, and more especially at a time when the ordinary methods may fail; the Committee recommend that the above Articles, computed for mean time, be incorporated with, and form part of, the Nautical Almanac: by which arrangement, both the navigator and the astronomer will be furnished with the addition of much valuable and important information, at a much less expense than they can now procure it; and the mariner (by thus having the means constantly at hand) will be more likely to adopt a practice which cannot fail of being oftentimes of very essential and perhaps vital importance. The Committee however recommend some slight additions, and a few alterations in the arrangement of the articles: the most important of which is the substitution of the heliocentric longitude and latitude, for the geocentric; with the hourly difference in right ascension and declination of Venus, if it can be conveniently introduced; together with the introduction of the logarithm of the radius vector, calculated to 7 places of decimals, the mean time of the transit of the planet, to the nearest minute, and the other computations carried to the same extent as in the Berlin Ephemeris. To which should be added the horizontal parallax and polar semidiameter of each planet, calculated to 2 places of decimals, for every 5th day of the year: the ratio of the two diameters (if known) being stated. And the Committee recommend that in the geocentric places of the planets, the effect of aberration should be included.

10. The Committee, at the same time that they recommend this great accession of strength to the purposes of navigation, would think themselves deficient in the duty which they owe to the interests of that science which they are more particularly called upon to protect and advance, if they did not claim from the hands of a liberal and enlightened government the same information with respect to the two other principal planets (Mercury and the Georgian); as well as a less extended account of the motions and positions of the four newly-discovered planets (Vesta, Juno, Pallas, and Ceres), together with an ephemeris, at the time of their expected re-appearance, of the two Comets of short period, and of the comet of Halley, which are now known to belong exclusively to our system. The amount of these proposed additions will be seen in the Appendix: and they will occupy forty pages of the Almanac. It might perhaps be urged that these cannot be available for any purposes of nautical astronomy. But, surely the frequent transits of Mercury over the sun's disc cannot be considered as wholly unconnected with the general improvement of astronomy and geography, the two loadstars of navigation: and if it were only on this account, it is requisite that the tables of the planet should be as accurate as possible. And in a system where each body is mutually dependent on the others, where the beauty and harmony of the whole cannot be elicited or explained without a minute examination of the motions of each planet in detail, and where much has been, and may still be, done by private observers towards this great end, the trifling expense, incurred by the additional information here alluded to, must not be considered as wholly lost to the country, but may be repaid with interest at some future period. The remarkable anomaly in the motion of the satellites of the Georgian, noticed by Sir William Herschel; the singular discrepancies in the orbits and motions of the four newly-discovered planets, situated at nearly an equal distance from the sun; and the suspicion of the existence of a highly-rarefied medium in which the planets perform their revolutions, indicated by the retarded motion of one of the above-mentioned comets,—may derive new light from future observations, and tend to enlarge our views of the system of the universe.

11. Considering the importance of the Eclipses of Jupiter's satellites in determining the longitude of places, and that it is consequently desirable to aim at the greatest perfection of the tables, the Committee recommend that there be given the time of the contact of the satellites with the planet, and likewise the time of the contact of their shadows, when the satellites pass over the disc of the planet. The Committee are aware that these phenomena can only be observed by powerful instruments; but since, in the opinion of some profound mathematicians, they present the best means of determining some of the elements in the theory of Jupiter's satellites, whereby the Tables may consequently be rendered more accurate and complete, they have not hesitated to recommend a measure

[page] xvi

which, at a very trifling expense, may induce such astronomers as are possessed of the requisite instruments, to enter on a series of observations connected with this delicate and important branch of astronomy. They further recommend that the computations of the time of the contacts above mentioned be calculated in sidereal time to the nearest minute, and that the time of the eclipses be extended to one place of decimals in the seconds; and given in sidereal as well as in mean solar time: and that for the convenience of observers there be annexed diagrams in each month, in lieu of the co-ordinates, for showing the position of each satellite with respect to Jupiter, at the time of immersion and emersion.

12. Although not immediately in the order of the subjects, yet as being in some measure connected with what has just been stated, the Committee here recommend that the Configurations of Jupiter's satellites should be determined for the hour of mean astronomical time, and not for the hour denoted by the civil mode of reckoning as hitherto adopted; which has been found to lead to some contusion: and that as much explanation should be given at the foot of the page as can be conveniently done; with a notice that the positions are such as they would appear in a telescope that inverts.

13. The Committee further recommend that the two columns entitled "Logarithms of C, D," inserted in the late Supplements to the Nautical Almanac, be retained: and that there be added thereto the logarithms of A, B. The computations to be made for mean midnight.

14. On the subject of the Lunar Distances, the Committee have had much discussion as to the propriety and advantage of extending them to every hour in the day, instead of every third hour as at present. But, although this arrangement might, at first, appear more convenient to the seaman, as well as more accurate in the results, inasmuch as the effect of the second differences would in such case almost wholly vanish; yet, when the Committee considered that the seaman must in every instance make a computation for the fractional part of the interval, and that the correction for second differences, in the case of three hours, is in general very small, and by no means equal in amount to other corrections, too frequently and too notoriously omitted in practice; and moreover that this proposal would have the effect of adding 120 pages to the Nautical Almanac: they have thought that they should not be justified in recommending a measure of such doubtful advantage, and which would certainly be attended with a considerable increase of expense. They however recommend that the proportional logarithm of the first difference, to 4 places of decimals (or to 5 places, if practicable), be inserted, for the convenience of the seaman: as well as a small table for finding the correction on account of second differences, which will not occupy more than half a page, and by means of which the intelligent navigator will be enabled to find the correction which ought to be applied, when great accuracy is required; and obviate the necessity of any further extension at present of the lunar distances. And, in compliance with the wishes of several officers of the Royal Navy, they suggest the propriety of extending the limits of each star a little farther, whenever it may appear to the computer that it can be done with good effect. The Committee also recommend that the lunar distances of the planets (already alluded to) be inserted amongst the other lunar distances in the monthly Ephemeris.

15. This completes the list of articles usually inserted in the monthly pages of the Nautical Almanac: and the Committee recommend that, for the convenience of taking out differences, there be inserted at the bottom of each page (when requisite) the quantities that follow next in order of succession on the first day of the following month. At the end of these monthly lists the Committee recommend that a page be set apart for the insertion of the following quantities, for every tenth day of the year, and computed to 2 places of decimals: viz. the apparent obliquity of the ecliptic, the parallax of the sun, the aberration of the sun, the equation of the equinoctial points in longitude, and also in right ascension (in time): together with the mean longitude of the moon's ascending node, to the tenth of a minute. And that there be also added, at the bottom, the mean obliquity of the ecliptic for January 1st; and the mean daily motion of the moon's node.

16. The Committee strongly recommend the insertion of the list of moon-culminating stars, given in the late Supplements to the Nautical Almanac, as affording one of the best modes of determining the longitude of distant places, when the navigator, furnished with a transit instrument, can obtain a landing. As it is absolutely essential, however, that only one list of such stars should be published for the use of navigators of all nations, and as

[page] xvii

Professor Encke proposes to discontinue his list as soon as he is assumed that the British Government will permanently adopt one, the Committee trust that they may be excused for entering rather more minutely into the mode in which those stars should be selected. They recommend, therefore, that not more than 4 stars should be selected for one day, 2 of which are to precede and 2 to follow the moon: that the stars thus forming each pair be chosen so as not to be very distant from each other in right ascension, and nearly midway between the right ascension of the moon at the time of her transit on two consecutive days: that the 2 stars chosen to follow the moon on one day, be adopted as the 2 to precede the moon on the subsequent day: that no star be selected below the 5th, but on no account below the 6th magnitude: that the stars so chosen should not be situated more than 5 degrees from the path of the moon's true orbit: and that the list should be continued through each lunation within 4 days of the new moon: that the apparent right ascension (in time) of the star to two places, and the mean declination of the star to the nearest minute, be given. And the Committee further recommend that an asterisk be annexed to those stars in the list which are situated between 4° and 14° of north declination, for the purpose of indicating, to observers in the northern and southern hemispheres, such as are best situated for observing the difference of declination between them and the moon, with a view to the determination of her parallax.

17. And for the convenience of those computations which are connected with moon culminating stars, the Committee likewise recommend that the column entitled the moon's "Semidiameter passing the meridian in sidereal time," as given in the late Supplements to the Nautical Almanac, be retained: but that it be extended to the time of the lower (as well as the upper) culmination: and that there be given also the right ascension (in time) of the moon's enlightened limb to two places, for her upper and lower culmination; together with the change in the same, corresponding to its transit over one hoar of longitude; and also the moon's declination, to the nearest minute, at the time of her transit.

18. In lieu of the "Elements for computing the principal lunar occultations of the fixed stars," usually inserted at the end of the Nautical Almanac, the Committee recommend that there should be given: 1st. A list of predicted occultations of such of the planets (including the satellites, when Jupiter is occulted) and of the fixed stars (to the 6th magnitude inclusive) as may be visible at Greenwich, both in mean and sidereal time to the nearest minute: with the angle from the vertex, as seen in a telescope that inverts, and also from the most northern point of the moon's disc, each reckoned in degrees from right to left, round the circumference. 2nd. Elements for predicting such occultations of the planets and fixed stars (to the 5th magnitude inclusive) as may be visible in some habitable part of the globe: together with the limits of latitude beyond which they cannot be occulted, as in the Bologna Ephemeris; in order that navigators may know when and where to look out for the phenomena. And they likewise recommend that the apparent places of such stars, on the day of occultation, be given.

19. The Committee further recommend that the Apparent places of the principal fixed stars be, in future, given for the time of their transit at Greenwich, and not (as heretofore) for the time of noon: and that the co-efficients A. B. C. D and the constants given in the Catalogue of this Society, be adopted in the computations. The places of a and δ Ursœ Minoris for every day in the year: and the remainder (as usual) for every tenth day, with a column of differences: and that where the proper name of a star is retained, there be added the constellation to which it belongs, and its corresponding letter or number. And as it has been a frequent source of regret, by navigators frequenting the Southern Ocean, that there are so few southern stars inserted in the usual list; and as it would be also desirable to have the apparent places of a few more circumpolar stars, as well as of some others to fill up the chasms in the present list; the Committee proceeded to the selection of the stars proper for those purposes, and they now submit the following general list of stars (comprehending most of those inserted in the late Nautical Almanacs, which are here distinguished by an asterisk prefixed) as the list that, under all circumstances, would be most suited to the wants of the navigator and the astronomer: at the same time, leaving the insertion of any others for future consideration. The Committee also recommend that the mean places of all these stars, for January 1st of the current year, be inserted in a separate list: that the magnitudes and annual variations be annexed: that the declinations in all cases be given, instead of the north polar distances: and that such declinations when south be denoted by the letter S (for the convenience of mariners) instead of the negative sign.

b

[page] xviii

Stars. Mag. A. R. Dec. Stars. Mag. A. B. Dec.
h. m. ° h. m. °
* γ Pogasi 2·3 0 4 + 14 14 * ηUrsæ Maj. 2·3 13 41 +50 10
β Hydri 3 0 17 -78 13 η Bootis 3 13 41 + 19 15
* α Cassiopeæ 3 0 31 +55 36 β Centauri 1 13 52 –59 33
β Ceti 2·3 0 35 -18 55 * α Bootis 1 14 8 +20 4
* α Ursæ Min. 2·3 0 59 +88 24 α2 Centauri 1 14 28 -60 8
γCeti 3 1 16 - 9 4 * ε Bootis 3 14 38 +27 48
α Eridani 1 1 31 -58 6 * α2 Libræ 3 14 41 -15 20
* α Arietis 3 1 58 +22 39 * β Ursæ Min. 3 14 51 + 74 51
γ Ceti 3 2 34 + 2 31 β Libræ 2·3 15 8 - 8 45
* α Ceti 2·3 2 53 + 3 25 * α Cor. Bor. 2 15 27 +27 18
* α Persei 2·3 3 12 +49 15 * α Serpentis 2·3 15 36 + 6 58
η Tauri 3 3 37 +23 34 ζ Ursæ Min. 4 15 50 +78 19
γ1 Eridani 2·3 3 50 -14 0 β1 Scorpii 2 15 56 -19 20
* α Tauri 1 4 26 + 16 10 * δ Ophiuchi 3 16 5 - 3 15
* α Aurigæ 1 5 4 +45 49 σ Octantis · 16 18 -89 25
* β Orionis 1 5 6 - 8 24 * α Scorpii 1 16 19 -26 3
* β Tauri 2 5 16 +28 27 η Draconis 3 16 22 +61 54
* δ Orionis 2 5 23 - 0 26 α Triang. Aust. 2 16 31 -68 42
α Leporis 3·4 5 25 -17 57 ε Ursæ Min. 4 17 4 +82 18
* ε Orionis 2·3 5 28 - 1 19 * α Herculis 3·4 17 7 +14 36
α Columbæ 2 5 33 -34 10 * β Draconis 2 17 27 +52 26
* α Orionis 1 5 46 + 7 22 * α Ophiuchi 2 17 27 + 12 43
µ Geminorum 3 6 13 +22 36 * γ Draconis 2 17 53 +51 31
51 (Hev.) Cephei 5 6 18 +87 17 µ1 Sagittarii 3·4 18 4 -21 6
α Argus 1 6 20 -52 36 * δ Ursæ Min. 3 18 27 +86 35
* α Canis Maj. 1 6 38 -16 29 * α Lyræ 1 18 31 +38 38
* α Canis Maj. 2·3 6 52 -28 45 * β Lyræ 3 18 44 +33 10
δ Geminorum 3·4 7 10 +22 17 * ζ Aquilæ 3 18 58 + 13 37
* α Geminorum 3 7 24 +32 15 * δ Aquilæ 3·4 19 17 + 2 47
* α Canis Min. 1·2 7 30 + 5 39 * γ Aquilæ 3 19 38 + 10 12
* β Geminorum 2 7 35 +28 26 * α Aquilæ 1·2 19 42 + 8 26
15 Argus 3·4 8 0 -22 49 * β Aquilæ 3·4 19 47 + 5 59
ε Hydræ 4 8 38 + 7 2 * α2 Capricorni 3 20 9 -13 4
ι Ursæ Maj. 3·4 8 47 +48 42 α Pavonis 2 20 12 -57 16
ι Argus 2 9 13 -58 34 * α Cygni 1 20 36 +44 41
* α Hydræ 2 9 19 - 7 56 *(61)1 Cygni · 20 59 +47 56
Ursæ Maj. 3 9 21 +52 27 ζ Cygni 3 21 6 +29 32
ε Leonis 3 9 36 +24 33 λ Ursæ Min. 5 21 8 +88 34
* α Leonis 1 9 59 +12 48 * α Cephei 3 21 15 +61 52
η Argua 2 10 38 -58 48 * β Aquarii 3 21 23 -6 19
* α Ursæ Maj. 1·2 10 53 +62 40 * α Cephei 3 21 26 +69 49
* δ Leonis 3 11 5 +21 27 ε Pegasi 2·3 21 36 +9 6
δ Hyd. et Crat. 3·4 11 11 -13 51 * α Aquarii 3 21 57 -1 8
* β Leonis 2·3 11 40 +15 31 α Gruis 2 21 57 -47 47
* γ Ursæ Maj. 2 11 45 +54 38 ζ Pegasi 3 22 33 +9 57
β Chamæleontis 5 12 9 -78 22 * α Piscis Aust. 1 22 48 -30 31
α2 Crucis 1 12 17 -62 9 * α Pegasi 2 22 56 +14 18
β Corvi 2·3 12 25 -22 27 ι Piscium 4·5 23 31 +4 42
12 Can. Venat. 2·3 12 48 +39 14 γ Cephei 3 23 32 +76 41
* α Virginia 1 13 16 -10 16 * α Andromedæ 1 24 0 +28 9

20. The Committee recommend that the several monthly lists of Phenomena, usually given in the first page of each month in the Nautical Almanac, be inserted altogether at some convenient part of the work: that the conjunctions of the fixed stars with the moon (as usually given) be wholly discontinued: that the conjunctions in future be confined to the planets with the moon and with such of the fixed stars as may afford any interesting results, and to the planets with each other: that such conjunctions be expressed in right ascension (and not in longitude as heretofore), to which should be added the difference of declination to the nearest minute: that the other phenomena which should be noted, be the times when the planets are in quadrature, conjunction, opposition, perihelion, aphelion, and nodes; as well as when stationary and at their greatest elongation and heliocentric latitude, with the amount of the former expressed to the nearest minute: also the time of the sun being in perigee and apogee; the time of the greatest brilliancy of Venus, of the maximum and minimum of the light of Algol and other variable stars, the maxima of the moon's libration, as well as notices of any remarkable phenomena that may be ex-

[page] xix

pected to take place, such as the transits of Mercury, the re-appearance of comets, &c. &c. And that at the end of this list there be given the elements for determining the geocentric form of Saturn's ring; together with elements for determining the illuminated portion of the discs of Venus and Mars.

21. The Committee likewise recommend the insertion of four tables, which may occasionally be found extremely useful and necessary to navigators and others, and which will not occupy much space: viz. 1st. A table for determining the latitude of a place by observations of the pole star at any hour of the day: 2nd. A table of the longitude and latitude of the principal observatories, from the latest information: 3rd. A table of the mean time of high water at London Bridge for every day in the year; and also at the principal ports, at the time of new and full moon: and 4th. Errata from time to time discovered in the principal logarithmic and other tables of repute. Together with Notices, from time to time, of important geographical information, comprising newly-determined positions, magnetic variations, phenomena of the tides, &c.

22. Reverting to those articles of the Nautical Almanac which usually precede the monthly parts, the Committee recommend that the "Ember days" be discontinued: and that the following days be subjoined to the "Moveable feasts" or united with them under some other title: viz. Epiphany, Good Friday, King Charles's restoration, Gunpowderplot, St. George, St. Andrew, St. Patrick, King's birth-day, accession, proclamation, and coronation, Queen's birth-day, Lady-day, Midsummer-day, Michaelmas-day, and Christmas-day, together with the commencement of the Jewish and of the Mohammedan year, and particularly the commencement of the fast of Ramadân (which may be occasionally useful to officers cruising in the neighbourhood of Mohammedan states), and such other days as the superintendent of the Nautical Almanac may think advisable.

23. In this part of the Nautical Almanac also is usually inserted the account of the solar and lunar eclipses. The Committee recommend that in the account of the solar eclipses, there should be given the elements employed in the computation, the line of the moon's umbra across the earth, together with a diagram of the same; and generally more particulars relative to the phenomena, as in the Berlin Ephemeris.

24. The Committee, considering that the table of "Refractions," the table "For reducing sexagesimal time to the decimal fraction of a day, and the reverse," and the table of the "Equation of second differences "are of a permanent nature, and that the latter, in fact, will be of little use to the navigator, should the present alteration in the arrangements be carried into effect, recommend that they be discontinued in the Nautical Almanac: and that they be transferred to another work which they trust will be formed for the benefit and promotion of nautical astronomy, under the title of "Tables requisite to be used with the new Nautical Almanac." They recommend, however, the insertion of the short table of the equation of second differences for intervals of three hours, mentioned in the preceding part of this Report.

25. Such are the alterations and additions which the Committee, after the most mature deliberation and discussion, have considered it advisable to recommend for adoption. They are of a nature to satisfy not only the wishes of the astronomer, but also the demands of the navigator: and the Committee are of opinion that, with due economy, and such an arrangement of the parts amongst the several computers as will afford them constant employment, the whole of the additional computations may in a short time be obtained without much (if any) additional cost to the nation. But whether a comparer, in addition to the superintendent and computers, be absolutely necessary, or whether any considerable sum could be saved in the articles of paper and printing, the Committee do not take upon themselves to decide. They have, however, no hesitation in stating it as their opinion that very considerable savings might be effected: and they have ascertained that the cost of paper and printing the additions proposed will not exceed £360: an expense which, even if charged on the work, would be cheerfully paid in consideration of the additional information which it contains. But by not raising the present price of the work, the inducement for reprinting it in foreign countries would be in a great measure removed: whilst its important and valuable contents would insure it a place in almost every vessel that sails on the ocean; and by thus increasing the sale, not only repay the additional charges incurred in the computations, but probably relieve the country also from a considerable annual expense.

26. The Committee strongly recommend that any errors, discovered in the Nautical Almanac, should be printed immediately for general information, and be annexed to all the unsold copies: and that notice of the same be advertised in the London Gazette, and in some of the public papers, as early as possible.

b 2

[page] xx

27. Should the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty think proper to adopt the alterations that may be ultimately agreed upon by the Council, the Committee recommend that the "Explanation," usually given at the end of the Nautical Almanac, be entirely re-composed in the plainest style possible, and new modelled so as to correspond with the proposed arrangements; with examples taken from the body of the work: and that a "Table of Contents" be prefixed. And they take this opportunity of expressing their decided opinion of the propriety and necessity of inserting in the "Preface" to each year's almanac, an account of all the tables and authorities depended upon in every computation, with an express notice of such equations as may be omitted, or of any corrections introduced; in order that any person may verify the calculations at his pleasure. Whether the names of the computers should be inserted, may be left to the discretion of the superintendent. The Committee however are of opinion that it would tend very much to the prevention and also the detection of errors in the computations, if printed skeleton forms, bound up in separate volumes of a sufficient magnitude for one year's use, were provided for the several computers: which when finished should be signed by them respectively, and afterwards deposited with, and preserved by, the superintendent for the purpose of reference.

28. The Committee also recommend that the publication of the Nautical Almanac be always four years in advance: and they consider that it would be highly desirable that the improvements, ultimately adopted in that work in consequence of this Report, should be ordered to appear in the volume for 1834, and by no means be deferred beyond that period: the Committee being confident that, by due exertion, this may be effected. And they recommend that notice of the same should be given in the Preface to the Nautical Almanac for 1833.

29. The Committee cannot close their labours, without acknowledging the valuable hints and suggestions contained in the several letters received from those members who could not conveniently attend the meetings: and who will see, from this Report, that every subject mentioned by them has regularly come under discussion.

30. The Committee are happy also in expressing their sense of the zeal and attention of one of the Associates of this Society (Professor STRUVE), who, during his short stay in England, devoted a considerable portion of his time to these proceedings: and from whose profound knowledge of every branch of practical and theoretical astronomy, the Committee have derived the most valuable assistance.

31. They likewise consider it their duty to notice the constant attendance of the Astronomer Royal at all their meetings; the readiness with which he afforded them every information relative to the various subjects that came under consideration; and the zeal with which he entered into all their views for improving this national work.

APPENDIX,—CONTAINING A LIST OF THE ARTICLES PROPOSED TO BE INSERTED IN THE NAUTICAL ALMANAC.

N.B. Those articles which are now introduced for the first time (that if, which do not form any part of the Nautical Almanac or its Supplement for 1830, or of the Specimen for 1833) are printed in Italics: and the same mode is adopted to denote the alterations which have been made in the extension of the computations of the other articles. By this method, the additions and alterations proposed may be readily distinguished.

The use of apparent time to be abolished in all the computations, except in those immediately connected with the sun's transit.

The day of the week, repeated as often as convenient.

—month, on every page.

—year (or days elapsed since Jan. 1st), in numerical order.

The fractional part of the year, for every such day.

Equinoctial time for every day in the year.

Mean time of the transit of the first point of Aries, to two places, for every day.

SUN'S Right ascension in time (with hourly motion), to two places,
Declination (with hourly motion), to one place,
Sidereal time of semidiameter passing meridian, to two places,
at the time of Sun's transit.
Equation of time (with hourly differences) to two places,

[page] xxi

SUN'S Right scension, to two places, at mean noon.
Declination, to one place,
Longitude, to one place,
Latitude, to two places,
Semidiameter, to one place,
Sidereal time, to two places,
Equation of time, to two places,
Logarithm of radius vector, to seven places,
MOON'S Longitude, to one place, for noon and midnight,
Latitude, to one place,
Horizontal parallax, to one place
Semidiameter, to one place,
Mean time of transit, to the tenth of minute.
Age, to the tenth of day, for noon.
A. R. in time, to two places, for every hour.
Declination, to one place,
—with differences for five minutes.
Phases to the tenth of minute, for each lunation.
Perigee and pogee for the nearest hour,
PLANETS, viz. Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Georgian, Heliocentric Longitude to one place, for every day at noon.
—Latitude, to one place,
Logarithm of Radius vector, to seven places,
Geocentric A. R. in time, to two places,
—Declination, to one place,
Log. dist. from the Earth, to seven places,
Mean time of transit, to the tenth of minute,
Horizontal parallax, to two places, for every fifth day.
Polar semidiameter, to two places,
PLANETS, viz. Vesta, Juno, Pallas, Ceres. Heliocentric Longitude, to the nearest minute. for every fourth day at noon.
—— Latitude,
Geocentric A. R. in time, to the tenth of minute,
—— Declination to the nearest minute,
Radius vector, to four places,
Log. dist. from the Earth, to four places,
Mean time of transit, to the tenth of minute,
Geocentric A. R. in time, to two places, for one month before and after opposition at midnight.
Declination to one place,
Radius vector, to five places,
Log. dist. from the Earth, to five places,

The co-efficients A, B, C, D, for every day, at midnight.

JUPITER'S SATELLITES. Eclipses of in mean and Sidereal time, to one place,
diagrams for showing the place at that time.
Contact with the planet, in Sidereal time, to the nearest minute.
Contact of shadows with the planet in do.
Configurations.
LUNAR DISTANCES from the Sun and the nine principal fixed stars, for every third hour.
and from Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn,

with the proportional Logarithms of the differences annexed.

Apparent obliquity of the ecliptic, to two places, for every tenth day.
Parallax of the sun, to two places,
Aberration of the sun, to two places,
Equation of equinoctial points in longitude to two places,
—— in A. R., to two places,
Mean longitude of Moon's node, to the tenth of minute,
Mean obliquity of the ecliptic, for January 1st, at the bottom of the page.
Mean daily motion of the moon's node,
ECLIPSES. Solar, with the line of the moon's umbra, diagrams, &c.
Lunar.

[page] xxii

Predicted Occupations (visible at Greenwich) of planets and fixed stars to the sixth magnitude inclusive, in mean and Sidereal time, to the nearest minute; with the angle from the vertex, and also from the most northern point of the moon's disc.

Elements for predicting such occultations of the planets and fixed stars to the fifth magnitude inclusive, as may be visible in any habitable part of the globe; with the limits of Latitude annexed.

The apparent places of the stars on the days of occultation to be given, in both cases.

Apparent places of the fixed stars (100 in number) for their time of transit:

a and δ Ursæ Minoris, for every day;

the remainder for every tenth day, with differences annexed;

Mean places of the same at the beginning of the year, in separate list.

A list of Moon-culminating Stars, continued within four days of new moon: the Apparent A. R. of the stars to two places, and the mean declination to the nearest minute. Also the

MOON'S A. R. in time, of her bright limb, to two places, for upper and lower culmination.
Variation in ditto for one hour of longitude,
Sidereal time of semidiameter passing meridian, to two places,
Declination, to nearest minute, for upper culmination.
A LIST OF PHENOMENA, containing conjunctions (in A. R.) of the planets with the moon.
certain fixed stars.
each other.
with difference of declination to the nearest minute.
time when the planets are
in Quadrature.
in Conjunction.
in Opposition.
in their Perihelion.
in their Aphelion.
in their Nodes.
stationary.
at their greatest heliocentric Latitude.
at their greatest Elongation (with amount).
time when the Sun is in Perigee.
Apogee.
time of the greatest brilliancy of Venus.
time of the maximum and minimum of the light of variable stars.
time of the maxim of the Moon's libration.
notice of transits of Mercury.
predicted Comets.
any other remarkable phenomena.
Elements for finding the geocentric appearance of Saturn's ring.
the illuminated portions of the discs of Venus and Mars.
TABLES for the correction of second differences, in Lunar distances.
for determining the Latitude by the pole star, out of the meridian.
of the Longitude and Latitude of the principal Observatories.
of the time of high water at London Bridge.
for finding the time of high water at the principal ports.
of Errat discovered in Logarithmic and other at tables of repute.

Notice of newly-determined positions, magnetic variations, &c. &c.

Preface to contain an account of all the Tables used in every computation; and notice of any Equations omitted, or new Corrections applied.

Cycles, remarkable days, moveable feasts, law terms, &c., to be prefixed.

Table of Contents.

(Signed) J. SOUTH, President.

[page] xxiii

PRINCIPAL ARTICLES OF THE CALENDAR,

For the Year 1834.

Golden Number 11
Epact 20
Solar Cycle 23
Dominical Letter E
Roman Indiction 7
Julian Period 6547

FIXED AND MOVEABLE FESTIVALS, ANNIVERSARIES, &c. &c.

Epiphany Jan. 6
Septuagesim Sunday 26
Martyrdom of K. Ch rles I. 30
Shrove Sunday Feb. 9
Ash Wednesday 12
St. David Mar. 1
St. Patrick 17
Palm Sunday 23
Annunciation—Lady Day 25
Good Friday 28
EASTER SUNDAY 30
Low Sunday Apr. 6
St. George 23
Rogation Sunday May 4
Ascension Day 8
Trinity Sunday 25
Whit Sunday May 18
Restoration of K. Charles II. 29
St. John Bapt.—Midsm D. June 24
Accession of K. William IV. 26
Proclamation 28
Birth of Q. Adelaide Aug. 13
Birth of K. W. IV.* 21
Coronation of K. W. IV. Sept. 8
St. Michael—Michaelmas Day 29
Gunpowder Plot Nov. 5
Advent Sunday 30
St. Thomas Dec. 21
St. Andrew 30
Christmas Day 25

* Kept May 28.

The Year 5595 of the Jewish Era commences on October 4, 1834.

The Year 1250 of the Mohammedan Era commences on May 9, 1834.

Ramadân (Month of Abstinence observed by the Turks) commences on January 11, 1834, and on December 31, 1834.

[page] xxiv

EXPLANATION OF ASTRONOMICAL SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS.

The Sun. ☌Conjunction. ∞Aries.
☾The Moon. Quadrature. 8Taurus.
Mercury. Opposition. Gemini.
♀Venus. Ascending Node. Cancer.
or The Earth. Descending Node. Leo.
♂Mars. N. North. Virgo.
Vesta. S. South. Libra.
Juno. ° Degrees. Scorpio.
Pallas. ′Minutes of Arc. Sagittarius.
Ceres. Seconds of Arc. Capricornus.
Jupiter. h Hours. m Aquarius.
Saturn. Minutes of Time. Pisces.
Georgian. Seconds of Time.

LAW TERMS, 1834,

As settled by Statute 1 WILL. IV. Cap. 70, s. 6. (Passed July 23, 1830.)

HILARY TERM Regins Jan. 11 Ends Jan. 31
EASTER Apr. 15 May 8
TRINITY May 22 June 12
MICHAELAMAS Nov. 3 Nov. 25

For Returns see Statute 1 WILL. IV. Cap. 3, sec. 2. (Passed Dec. 23, 1830.)

UNIVERSITY TERMS, 1834.

OXFORD CAMBRIDGE.
Names.
Bedins. Ends. Begins. Divides. Ends.
Hilary Jan. 14 Mar. 22 Jan. 13 Feb. 15, Midnight. Mar. 21
Easter April 9 May 17 April 9 May 22, Noon. July 4
Trinity May 21 July 5
Michaelmas Oct. 10 Dec. 17 Oct. 10 Nov. 12, Midnight. Dec. 16
The Act, July 1. The Commencement, July 1.

[page] 1

EPHEMERIS

FOR THE YEAR

1834,

FOR THE MERIDIAN

OF THE

ROYAL OBSERVATORY AT GREENWICH.

[page] 2

AT APPARENT NOON.

Days of the Week. Days of the Month. THE SUN'S Sidereal Time of the Semidiam. passing the Meridian.* Equation of Time, to be Added to Apparent Time. Diff. for 1 hour.
Right scension. Diff. for 1 hour. Declination. Diff. for 1 hour.
h m s s ° m s m s s
Wed. 1 18 46 27·49 11·038 S. 23 1 49·7 12·83 1 11·02 3 49·40 1·178
Thur. 2 18 50 52·39 11·023 22 56 41·7 13·98 1 10·97 4 17·66 1·163
Frid. 3 18 55 16·92 11·008 22 51 6·2 15·11 1 10·92 4 45·56 1·148
Sat. 4 18 59 41·11 10·992 22 45 3·5 16·24 1 10·86 5 13·12 1·132
Sun. 5 19 4 4·91 10·973 22 38 33·8 17·36 1 10·80 5 40·29 1·113
Mon. 6 19 8 28·27 10·954 22 31 37·1 18·48 1 10·74 6 7·01 1·094
Tues. 7 19 12 51·16 10·934 22 24 13·7 19·58 1 10·67 6 33·28 1·075
Wed. 8 19 17 13·58 10·911 22 16 23·9 20·67 1 10·60 6 59·07 1·052
Thur. 9 19 21 35·45 10·890 22 8 7·7 21·76 1 10·53 7 24·32 1·030
Frid. 10 19 25 56·81 10·865 21 59 25·5 22·83 1 10·46 7 49·04 1·007
Sat. 11 19 30 17·58 10·840 21 50 17·6 23·89 1 10·38 8 13·20 0·981
Sun. 12 19 34 37·75 10·814 21 40 44·2 24·94 1 10·30 8 36·75 0·955
Mon. 13 19 38 57·29 10·787 21 30 45·6 25·98 1 10·21 8 59·66 0·928
Tues. 14 19 43 16·17 10·759 21 20 22·1 27·01 1 10·12 9 21·92 0·900
Wed. 15 19 47 34·38 10·730 21 9 33·9 28·02 1 10·03 9 43·51 0·871
Thur. 16 19 51 51·89 10·700 20 58 21·5 29·02 1 9·94 10 4·41 0·841
Frid. 17 19 56 8·68 10·670 20 46 45·1 30·00 1 9·85 10 24·59 0·811
Sat. 18 20 0 24·75 10·638 20 34 45·1 80·97 1 9·75 10 44·05 0·780
Sun. 19 20 4 40·06 10·606 20 22 21·7 31·93 1 9·64 11 2·75 0·748
Mon. 20 20 8 54·61 10·574 20 9 35·5 32·87 1 9·53 11 20·70 0·715
Tues. 21 20 13 8·39 10·542 19 56 26·5 33·79 1 9·43 11 37·87 0·683
Wed. 22 20 17 21·39 10·509 19 42 55·4 34·71 1 9·32 11 54·27 0·650
Thur. 23 20 21 33·60 10·475 19 29 2·4 35·61 1 9·21 12 9·88 0·617
Frid. 24 20 25 45·00 10·442 19 14 47·8 36·49 1 9·11 12 24·68 0·584
Sat. 25 20 29 55·62 10·409 19 0 12·1 37·36 1 8·99 12 38·70 0·551
Sun. 26 20 34 5·43 10·375 18 45 15·6 38·21 1 8·88 12 51·92 0·518
Mon. 27 20 38 14·43 10·341 18 29 58·7 39·04 1 8·77 13 4·35 0·483
Tues. 28 20 42 22·62 10·308 18 14 21·8 39·86 1 8·66 13 15·95 0·450
Wed. 29 20 46 30·02 10·274 17 58 25·2 40·66 1 8·55 13 26·75 0·417
Thur. 30 20 50 36·60 10·240 17 42 9·3 41·45 1 8·43 13 36·75 0·383
Frid. 31 20 54 42·38 10·208 17 25 34·4 42·22 1 8·32 13 45·95 0·350
Sat. 32 20 58 47·34 S. 17 8 41·2 1 8·20 13 54·34

* Mean time of the Semidiameter Semidiameter passing may be found by subtracting 0·19 from the sideral Time.

[page] 3

AT MEAN NOON.

Days of the Week. Days of the Month. THE SUN'S Equation of Time, to be Added to Apparent Time. Sidereal Time.
Right Ascension. Declination. Semidiam*.
h m s ° m s h m s
Wed. 1 18 46 26·79 S. 23 1 50·5 16 17·3 3 49·33 18 42 37·46
Thur. 2 18 50 51·60 22 56 42·7 16 17·3 4 17·58 18 46 34·02
Frid. 3 18 55 16·05 22 51 7·4 16 17·3 4 45·47 18 50 30·58
Sat. 4 18 59 40·15 22 45 4·9 16 17·2 5 13 02 18 54 27·13
Sun. 5 19 4 3·87 22 38 35·4 16 17·2 5 40·18 18 58 23·69
Mon. 6 19 8 27·15 22 31 38·9 16 17·2 6 6·90 19 2 20·25
Tues. 7 19 12 49·97 22 24 15·8 16 17·1 6 33·16 19 6 16·81
Wed. 8 19 17 12·31 22 16 26·2 16 17·1 6 58·95 19 10 13·36
Thur. 9 19 21 34·11 22 8 10·3 16 17·1 7 24·19 19 14 9·92
Frid. 10 19 25 55·39 21 59 28·4 16 17·0 7 48·91 19 18 6·48
Sat. 11 19 30 16·10 21 50 20·8 16 17·0 8 13·06 19 22 3·04
Sun. 12 19 34 36·20 21 40 47·7 16 16·9 8 36·61 19 25 59·39
Mon. 13 19 38 55·67 21 30 49·4 16 16·8 8 59·52 19 29 56·15
Tues. 14 19 43 14·49 21 20 26·2 16 16·8 9 21·78 19 33 52·71
Wed. 15 19 47 32·64 21 9 38·4 16 16·7 9 43·37 19 37 49·27
Thur. 16 19 51 50·09 20 58 26·3 16 16·6 10 4·27 19 41 45·82
Frid. 17 19 56 6·83 20 46 50·2 16 16·6 10 24·45 19 45 42·38
Sat. 18 20 0 22·85 20 34 50·5 16 16·5 10 43·91 19 49 38·94
Sun. 19 20 4 38·10 20 22 27·5 16 16·4 11 2·61 19 53 35·49
Mon. 20 20 8 52·61 20 9 41·6 16 16·3 11 20·56 19 57 32·05
Tues. 21 20 13 6·34 19 56 33·0 16 16·2 11 37·73 20 1 28·61
Wed. 22 20 17 19·30 19 43 2·2 16 16·1 11 54·14 20 5 55·16
Thur. 23 20 21 31·47 19 29 9·5 16 16·0 12 9·75 20 9 21·72
Frid. 24 20 25 42·84 19 14 55·3 16 15·9 12 24·56 20 13 18·28
Sat. 25 20 29 53·42 19 0 19·9 16 15·8 12 38·59 20 17 14·83
Sun. 26 20 34 3·20 18 45 23·7 16 15·7 12 51·81 20 21 11·39
Mon. 27 20 38 12·18 18 30 7·1 16 15·5 13 4·24 20 25 7·94
Tues. 28 20 42 20·34 18 14 30·5 16 15·4 13 15·84 20 29 4·50
Wed. 29 20 46 27·71 17 58 34·2 16 15·2 13 26·65 20 33 1·06
Thur. 30 20 50 34·27 17 42 18·6 16 15·1 13 36·66 20 36 57·61
Frid. 31 20 54 40·03 17 25 44·0 16 15·0 13 45·86 20 40 54·17
Sat. 32 20 58 44·98 S. 17 8 51·1 16 14·8 13 54·26 20 44 50·72

* The Semidiameter for Apparent Noon may be assumed the same as that for Mean Noon.

B 2

[page] 4

MEAN TIME.

Days of the Month. THE SUN'S Logarithm of the Radius Vector of the Earth. THE MOON'S
Longitude. Latitude. Semidiameter. Horizontal Parallax.
Noon. Noon. Noon. Noon. Midnight. Noon. Midnight.
°
1 280 40 29·2 N.0·88 9·9926613 16 10·6 16 8·1 59 21·9 59 12·8
2 281 41 38·8 0·89 9·9926665 16 5·4 16 2·4 59 2·6 58 51·8
3 282 42 48·4 0·89 9·9926740 15 59·3 15 56·1 58 40·3 58 28·4
4 283 43 58·2 0·84 9·9926838 15 52·7 15 49·1 58 16·0 58 3·0
5 284 45 8·3 0·77 9·9926955 15 45·6 15 41·9 57 49·9 57 36·4
6 285 46 18·3 0·68 9·9927093 15 38·1 15 34·4 57 22·7 57 8·8
7 286 47 28·3 0·57 9·9927249 15 30·4 15 26·5 56 54·5 56 40·1
8 287 48 38·2 0·45 9·9927424 15 22·6 15 18·6 56 25·6 56 11·0
9 288 49 47·7 0·33 9·9927615 15 14·6 15 10·7 55 56·4 55 41·9
10 289 50 57·2 0·21 9·9927824 15 6·8 15 3·1 55 27·8 55 14·2
11 290 52 6·3 N. 0·10 9·9928049 14 59·6 14 56·3 55 1·1 54 49·0
12 291 53 14·8 0·00 9·9928290 14 53·3 14 50·7 54 38·2 54 28·6
13 292 54 22·8 S.0·08 9·9928549 14 48·5 14 46·7 54 20·4 54 13·8
14 293 55 30·0 0·14 9·9928825 14 45·4 14 44·7 54 9·1 54 6·7
15 294 56 36·7 0·18 9·9929119 14 44·6 14 45·2 54 6·3 54 8·5
16 295 57 42·5 0·17 9·9929433 14 46·5 14 48·4 54 13·2 54 20·3
17 296 58 47·4 0·15 9·9929767 14 51·1 14 54·5 54 30·1 54 42·5
18 297 59 51·6 0·10 9·9930122 14 58·6 15 3·3 54 57·5 55 14·9
19 299 0 54·6 S.0·03 9·9930500 15 8·7 15 14·6 55 34·7 55 56·5
20 300 1 56·8 N.0·06 9·9930901 15 21·1 15 27·9 56 20·2 56 45·2
21 301 2 58·0 0·18 9·9931327 15 35·0 15 42·3 57 11·4 57 38·0
22 302 3 58·3 0·30 9·9931778 15 49·6 15 56·7 58 4·7 58 30·7
23 303 4 57·6 0·43 9·9932252 16 3·5 16 9·9 58 55·9 59 19·4
24 304 5 56·0 0·55 9·9932755 16 15·6 16 20·5 59 40·3 59 58·3
25 305 6 53·4 0·66 9·9933283 16 24·5 16 27·6 60 13·1 60 24·2
26 306 7 50·0 0·75 9·9933836 16 29·6 16 30·5 60 31·7 60 35·0
27 307 8 45·8 0·83 9·9934416 16 30·3 16 29·1 60 34·2 60 29·9
28 308 9 40·6 0·88 9·9935020 16 27·0 16 23·9 60 22·0 60 10·6
29 309 10 34·7 0·89 9·9935647 16 20·2 16 15·8 59 56·9 59 40·9
30 310 11 27·9 0·89 9·9936299 16 10·9 16 5·7 59 23·0 59 3·8
31 311 12 20·4 0·86 9·9936972 16 0·3 15 54·9 58 44·2 58 24·2
32 312 13 11·9 N.0·79 9·9937666 15 49·4 15 44·0 58 4·0 57 44·1

[page] 5

MEAN TIME.

Days of the Week. Days of the Month. THE MOON'S
Longitude. Latitude. Age. Meridian Passage
Noon. Midnight. Noon. Midnight. Noon.
° ° ° ° d h m
Wed. 1 175 10 41·9 182 18 22·5 N.5 11 33·3 N.5 16 28·3 21·2 17 43·8
Thur. 2 189 23 44·2 196 26 32·7 5 16 32·4 5 11 49·8 22·2 18 33·0
Frid. 3 203 26 35·2 210 23 43·7 5 2 30·4 4 48 48·0 23·2 19 22·1
Sat. 4 217 17 51·3 224 8 53·5 4 31 0·2 4 9 27·4 24·2 20 12·0
Sun. 5 230 56 47·8 237 41 32·4 3 44 32·4 3 16 41·2 25·2 21 3·3
Mon. 6 244 23 5·7 251 1 27·1 2 46 21·4 2 14 0·1 26·2 21 56·1
Tues. 7 257 36 36·3 264 8 32·8 1 40 7·3 N.1 5 12·1 27·2 22 49·9
Wed. 8 270 37 16·8 277 2 49·0 N.0 29 44·1 S.0 5 48·4 28·2 23 43·9
Thur. 9 283 25 9·3 289 44 20·7 S.0 40 57·9 1 15 18·6 29·2
Frid. 10 296 0 26·0 302 13 29·8 1 48 26·2 2 19 58·9 0·5 0 36·7
Sat. 11 308 23 38·0 314 31 0·1 2 49 37·0 3 17 2·8 1·5 1 27·3
Sun. 12 320 35 47·2 326 38 12·8 3 42 1·6 4 4 20·3 2·5 2 15·2
Mon. 13 332 38 33·1 338 37 7·9 4 23 48·7 4 40 17·6 3·5 3 0·4
Tues. 14 344 34 18·7 350 30 30·0 4 53 40·2 5 3 51·1 4·5 3 43·3
Wed. 15 356 26 8·5 2 21 43·6 5 10 46·3 5 14 22·2 5·5 4 24·7
Thur. 16 8 17 47·0 14 14 50·5 5 14 36·9 5 11 29·2 6·5 5 5·4
Frid. 17 20 13 29·2 26 14 17·9 5 4 58·8 4 55 5·7 7·5 5 46·3
Sat. 18 32 17 53·5 38 24 50·1 4 41 51·6 4 25 19·0 8·5 6 28·6
Sun. 19 44 35 44·1 50 51 8·2 4 5 31·7 3 42 35·2 9·5 7 13·2
Mon. 20 57 11 35·4 63 37 33·1 3 16 38·1 2 47 50·7 10·5 8 1·1
Tues. 21 70 9 25·6 76 47 31·9 2 16 26·3 1 42 43·4 11·5 8 53·1
Wed. 22 83 32 5·1 90 23 9·6 S.1 7 3·3 S.0 29, 52·6 12·5 9 49·2
Thur. 23 97 20 41·2 104 24 27·1 N.0 8 17·9 N.0 46 52·8 13·5 10 48·7
Frid. 24 111 34 3·9 118 48 58·3 1 25 13·3 2 2 38·0 14·5 11 49·9
Sat. 25 126 8 26·7 133 31 38·0 2 38 22·5 3 11 44·4 15·5 12 50·7
Sun. 26 140 57 32·9 148 25 7·8 3 42 1·8 4 8 37·9 16·5 13 49·3
Mon. 27 155 53 16·2 163 20 53·7 4 31 0·0 4 48 43·7 17·5 14 45·1
Tues. 28 170 46 57·5 178 10 30·3 5 1 30·2 5 9 10·8 18·5 15 38·1
Wed. 29 185 30 41·9 192 46 52·5 5 11 43·1 5 9 12·0 19·5 16 29·2
Thur. 30 199 58 30·0 207 5 12·4 5 1 49·2 4 49 51·0 20·5 17 19·3
Frid. 31 214 6 46·6 221 3 6·6 4 33 38·9 4 13 36·5 21·5 18 9·4
Sat. 32 227 54 15·6 234 40 19·7 N.3 50 9·4 N.3 23 45·8 22·5 19 0·3

[page] 6

MEAN TIME.

THE MOON'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION.

Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′. Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′.
WEDNESDAY 1. FRIDAY 3.
h m s ° h m s °
0 11 50 35·53 N.6 40 53·1 136·66 0 13 34 14·53 S.4 25 30·5 136·11
1 11 52 47·80 6 27 13·2 136·95 1 13 36 22·84 4 39 7·2 135·80
2 11 54 59·89 6 13 31·4 137·24 2 13 38 31·17 4 52 42·0 135·47
3 11 57 11·81 5 59 48·0 137·50 3 13 40 39·51 5 6 14·8 135·14
4 11 59 23·57 5 46 3·0 137·76 4 13 42 47·88 5 19 45·6 134·79
5 12 1 35·15 5 32 16·4 138·00 5 13 44 56·27 5 33 14·4 134·43
6 12 3 46·58 5 18 28·4 138·23 6 13 47 4·69 5 46 40·9 134·05
7 12 5 57·85 5 4 39·1 138·44 7 13 49 13·15 6 0 5·2 133·67
8 12 8 8·97 4 50 48·4 133·64 8 13 51 21·64 6 13 27·3 133·27
9 12 10 19·94 4 36 56·5 138·83 9 13 53 30·17 6 26 46·9 132·87
10 12 12 30·76 4 23 3·6 139·00 10 13 55 38·74 6 40 4·1 132·45
11 12 14 41·45 4 9 9·6 139·16 11 13 57 47·36 6 53 18·8 132·02
12 12 16 51·99 3 55 14·6 139·31 12 13 59 56·03 7 6 30·9 131·58
13 12 19 2·40 3 41 18·7 139·44 13 14 2 4·75 7 19 40·4 131·13
14 12 21 12·69 3 27 22·1 139·56 14 14 4 13·54 7 32 47·1 130·66
15 12 23 22·85 3 13 24·8 139·67 15 14 6 22·38 7 45 51·1 130·19
16 12 25 32·89 2 59 26·8 139·76 16 14 8 31·28 7 58 52·2 129·70
17 12 27 42·81 2 45 28·2 139·84 17 14 10 40·25 8 11 50·4 129·20
18 12 29 52·62 2 31 29·2 139·91 18 14 12 49·29 8 24 45·6 128·69
19 12 32 2·32 2 17 29·7 139·96 19 14 14 58·41 8 37 37·7 128·17
20 12 34 11·92 2 3 30·0 140·00 20 14 17 7·60 8 50 26·8 127·64
21 12 36 21·42 1 49 29·9 140·03 21 14 19 16·86 9 3 12·6 127·10
22 12 38 30·82 1 35 29·7 140·05 22 14 21 26·22 9 15 55·2 126·54
23 12 40 40·13 N.1 21 29·4 140·05 23 14 23 35·65 S. 9 28 34·5 125·98
THURSDAY 2. SATURDAY 4.
0 12 42 49·34 N. 1 7 29·1 140·05 0 14 25 45·18 S. 9 41 10·3 125·40
1 12 44 58·47 0 53 28·8 140·03 1 14 27 54·80 9 53 42·7 124·82
2 12 47 7·53 0 39 28·6 139·99 2 14 30 4·50 10 6 11·7 124·22
3 12 49 16·51 0 25 28·7 139·95 3 14 32 14·31 10 18 37·0 123·61
4 12 51 25·42 N. 0 11 29·0 139·89 4 14 34 24·21 10 30 58·6 122·99
5 12 53 34·26 S. 0 2 30·3 139·81 5 14 36 34·22 10 43 16·6 122·36
6 12 55 43·03 0 16 29·2 139·73 6 14 38 44·33 10 55 30·8 121·72
7 12 57 51·74 0 30 27·6 139·63 7 14 40 54·54 11 7 41·1 121·07
8 13 0 0·40 0 44 25·4 139·52 8 14 43 4·87 11 19 47·5 120·41
9 13 2 9·00 0 58 22·5 139·40 9 14 45 15·30 11 31 50·0 119·74
10 13 4 17·56 1 12 18·9 139·27 10 14 47 25·85 11 43 48·4 119·05
11 13 6 26·07 1 26 14·5 139·12 11 14 49 36·51 11 55 42·7 118·36
12 13 8 34·55 1 40 9·2 138·96 12 14 51 47·29 12 7 32·9 117·66
13 13 10 42·98 1 54 3·0 138·79 13 14 53 58·19 12 19 18·8 116·94
14 13 12 51·39 2 7 55·7 138·60 14 14 56 9·22 12 31 0·5 116·22
15 13 14 59·76 2 21 47·3 138·41 15 14 58 20·37 12 42 37·7 115·48
16 13 17 8·11 2 35 37·7 138·20 16 15 0 31·64 12 54 10·6 114·73
17 13 19 16·44 2 49 26·9 137·98 17 15 2 43·05 13 5 39·0 113·97
18 13 21 24·76 3 3 14·8 137·75 18 15 4 54·58 13 17 2·9 113·21
19 13 23 33·06 3 17 1·3 137·51 19 15 7 6·25 13 28 22·1 112·43
20 13 25 41·35 3 30 46·4 137·25 20 15 9 18·05 13 39 36·7 111·64
21 13 27 49·64 3 44 29·9 136·98 21 15 11 29·98 13 50 46·5 110·84
22 13 29 57·93 3 58 11·8 136·71 22 15 13 42·05 14 1 51·5 110·03
23 13 32 6·23 4 11 52·0 136·41 23 15 15 54·26 14 12 51·7 109·21
24 13 34 14·53 S.4 25 30·5 24 15 18 6·60 S.14 23 47·0

[page] 7

MEAN TIME.

THE MOON'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION.

Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′. Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′.
SUNDAY 5. TUESDAY 7.
h m s ° h m s °
0 15 18 6·60 S. 14 23 47·0 108·38 0 17 6 47·66 S. 21 13 16·0 58·04
1 15 20 19·09 14 34 37·3 107·54 1 17 9 6·65 21 19 4·3 56·82
2 15 22 31·72 14 45 22·5 106·69 2 17 11 25·74 21 24 45·1 55·58
3 15 24 44·49 14 56 2·7 105·83 3 17 13 44·91 21 30 18·6 54·34
4 15 26 57·41 15 6 37·7 104·96 4 17 16 4·18 21 35 44·7 5·10
5 15 29 10·47 15 17 7·4 104·08 5 17 18 23·52 21 41 3·3 51·85
6 15 31 23·67 15 27 31·9 103·19 6 17 20 42·95 21 46 14·5 50·60
7 15 33 37·02 15 37 51·1 102·29 7 17 23 2·45 21 51 18·1 49·35
8 15 35 50·52 15 48 4·8 101·38 8 17 25 22·03 21 56 14·1 48·09
9 15 38 4·17 15 58 13·1 100·46 9 17 27 41·67 22 1 2·7 46·82
10 15 40 17·97 16 8 15·9 99·53 10 17 30 1·38 22 5 43·6 45·55
11 15 42 31·91 16 18 13·1 98·60 11 17 32 21·15 22 10 16·9 44·28
12 15 44 46·01 16 28 4·7 97·65 12 17 34 40·97 22 14 42·6 43·00
13 15 47 0·25 16 37 50·5 96·69 13 17 37 0·85 22 19 0·6 41·72
14 15 49 14·64 16 47 30·7 95·72 14 17 39 20·79 22 23 11·0 40·44
15 15 51 29·18 16 57 5·0 94·75 15 17 41 40·76 22 27 13·6 39·16
16 15 53 43·87 17 6 33·5 93·76 16 17 44 0·78 22 31 8·5 37·87
17 15 55 58·70 17 15 56·1 92·77 17 17 46 20·84 22 34 55·8 36·58
18 15 58 13·69 17 25 12·7 91·77 18 17 48 40·93 22 38 35·2 35·29
19 16 0 28·82 17 34 23·3 90·76 19 17 51 1·06 22 42 6·9 38·99
20 16 2 44·11 17 43 27·8 89·74 20 17 53 21·20 22 45 30·9 32·69
21 16 4 59·54 17 52 26·3 88·71 21 17 55 41·37 22 48 47·1 31·40
22 16 7 15·12 18 1 18·5 87·67 22 17 58 1·55 23 51 55·4 30·10
23 16 9 30·84 S. 18 10 4·6 86·63 23 18 0 21·74 S. 22 54 56·0 28·79
MONDAY 6. WEDNESDAY 8.
0 16 11 46·71 S. 18 18 44·3 85·58 0 18 2 41·95 S. 22 57 48·8 27·49
1 16 14 2·72 18 27 17·8 84·52 1 18 5 2·16 23 0 33·7 26·19
2 16 16 18·88 18 35 44·9 83·45 2 18 7 22·36 23 3 10·8 24·88
3 16 18 35·18 18 44 5·6 82·37 3 18 9 42·56 23 5 40·1 23·58
4 16 20 51·62 18 52 19·8 81·28 4 18 12 2·75 23 8 1·6 22·27
5 16 23 8·20 19 0 27·6 80·19 5 18 14 22·92 23 10 15·2 20·96
6 16 25 24·92 19 8 28·7 79·09 6 18 16 43·07 23 12 21·0 19·65
7 16 27 41·78 19 16 23·2 77·98 7 18 19 3·20 23 14 18·9 18·34
8 16 29 58·78 19 24 11·1 76·86 8 18 21 23·29 23 16 9·0 17·04
9 16 32 15·90 19 31 52·3 75·74 9 18 23 43·36 23 17 51·2 15·73
10 16 34 33·17 19 39 26·7 74·60 10 18 26 3·38 23 19 25·5 14·42
11 16 36 50·56 19 46 54·3 73·46 11 18 28 23·35 23 20 52·0 13·11
12 16 39 8·09 19 54 15·1 72·31 12 18 30 43·28 23 22 10·7 11·80
13 16 41 25·74 20 1 29·0 71·16 13 18 33 3·15 23 23 21·5 10·49
14 16 43 43·52 20 8 35·9 70·00 14 18 35 22·97 23 24 24·5 9·19
15 16 46 1·42 20 15 35·9 68·83 15 18 37 42·72 23 25 19·6 7·89
16 16 48 19·44 20 22 28·9 67·66 16 18 40 2·40 23 26 6·9 6·59
17 16 50 37·58 20 29 14·9 66·48 17 18 42 22·01 23 26 46·5 5·29
18 16 52 55·84 20 35 53·7 65·29 18 18 44 41·54 23 27 18·2 3·99
19 16 55 14·21 20 42 25·5 64·10 19 18 47 0·99 23 27 42·1 2·70
20 16 57 32·69 20 48 50·0 62·90 20 18 49 20·36 23 27 58·3 1·40
21 16 59 51·28 20 55 7·4 61·69 21 18 51 39·63 23 28 6·8 0·12
22 17 2 9·97 21 1 17·5 60·48 22 18 53 58·81 23 28 7·5 1·17
23 17 4 28·77 21 7 20·4 59·26 23 18 56 17·89 23 28 0·5 2·45
24 17 6 47·66 S. 21 13 16·0 24 18 58 36·86 S. 23 27 45·7

[page] 8

MEAN TIME.

THE MOON'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION.

Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′. Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′.
THURSDAY 9. SATURDAY 11.
h m s ° h m s °
0 18 58 36·86 S. 23 27 45·7 3·73 0 20 46 26·06 S. 20 54 33·9 58·75
1 19 0 55·73 23 27 23·4 5·00 1 20 48 35·36 20 48 41·4 59·72
2 19 3 14·48 23 26 53·3 6·28 2 20 50 44·39 20 42 43·1 60·68
3 19 5 33·11 23 26 15·7 7·55 3 20 52 53·17 20 36 39·0 61·63
4 19 7 51·62 23 25 30·4 8·81 4 20 55 1·68 20 30 29·2 62·57
5 19 10 10·00 23 24 37·5 10·08 5 20 57 9·94 20 24 13·8 63·51
6 19 12 28·25 23 23 37·1 11·33 6 20 59 17·93 20 17 52·7 64·43
7 19 14 46·37 23 22 29·1 12·59 7 21 1 25·66 20 11 26·1 65·35
8 19 17 4·34 23 21 13·5 13·84 8 21 3 33·12 20 4 54·0 66·26
9 19 19 22·17 23 19 50·5 15·08 9 21 5 40·32 19 58 16·5 67·15
10 19 21 39·85 23 18 20·0 16·32 10 21 7 47·26 19 51 33·6 68·04
11 19 23 57·37 23 16 42·1 17·56 11 21 9 53·93 19 44 45·3 68·93
12 19 26 14·74 23 14 56·7 18·79 12 21 12 0·34 19 37 51·8 69·80
13 19 28 31·95 23 13 3·9 20·02 13 21 14 6·48 19 30 53·0 70·66
14 19 30 48·99 23 11 3·8 21·24 14 21 16 12 36 19 23 49·0 71·51
15 19 33 5·86 23 8 56·4 22·45 15 21 18 17·97 19 16 39·9 72·36
16 19 35 22·56 23 6 41·7 23·66 16 21 20 23·31 19 9 25·8 73·20
17 19 37 39·08 23 4 19·7 24·87 17 21 22 28·39 19 2 6·6 74·03
18 19 39 55·42 23 1 50·5 26·07 18 21 24 33·21 18 54 42·4 74·85
19 19 42 11·58 22 59 14·1 27·26 19 21 26 37·76 18 47 13·3 75·66
20 19 44 27·55 22 56 30·5 28·44 20 21 28 42·04 18 39 39·4 76·46
21 19 46 43·32 22 53 39·9 29·62 21 21 30 46·06 18 32 0·6 77·26
22 19 48 58·91 22 50 42·1 30·80 22 21 32 49·82 18 24 17·1 78·04
23 19 51 14·29 S. 22 47 37·3 31·97 23 21 34 53·31 S. 18 16 28·8 78·82
FRIDAY 10. SUNDAY 12.
0 19 53 29·47 S. 22 44 25·5 33·13 0 21 36 56·54 S. 18 8 35·9 79·59
1 19 55 44·45 22 41 6·8 34·28 1 21 38 59·51 18 0 38·4 80·35
2 19 57 59·22 22 37 41·1 35·43 2 21 41 2·22 17 52 36·3 81·10
3 20 0 13·77 22 34 8·6 36·57 3 21 43 4·66 17 44 29·7 81·84
4 20 2 28·12 22 30 29·2 37·70 4 21 45 6·85 17 36 18·7 82·57
5 20 4 42·24 22 26 43·0 38·82 5 21 47 8·78 17 28 3·3 83·29
6 20 6 56·15 22 22 50·0 39·94 6 21 49 10·45 17 19 43·5 84·01
7 20 9 9·83 22 18 50·4 41·05 7 21 51 11·87 17 11 19·5 84·72
8 20 11 23·29 22 14 44·1 42·16 8 21 53 13·03 17 2 51·2 85·42
9 20 13 36·52 22 10 31·1 43·25 9 21 55 13·94 16 54 18·7 86·11
10 20 15 49·52 22 6 11·6 44·34 10 21 57 14·59 16 45 42·0 86·79
11 20 18 2·28 22 1 45·6 45·42 11 21 59 15·00 16 37 1·3 87·46
12 20 20 14·81 21 57 13·0 46·50 12 22 1 15·15 16 28 16·6 88·12
13 20 22 27·10 21 52 34·1 47·56 13 22 3 15·06 16 19 27·8 88·78
14 20 24 39·15 21 47 48·7 48·62 14 22 5 14·72 16 10 35·2 89·42
15 20 26 50·97 21 42 57·0 49·67 15 22 7 14·14 16 1 38·6 90·06
16 20 29 2·53 21 37 59·0 50·71 16 22 9 13·31 15 52 38·2 90·70
17 20 31 13·85 21 32 54·7 51·74 17 22 11 12·24 15 43 34·1 91·32
18 20 33 24·93 21 27 44·3 52·77 18 22 13 10·94 15 34 26·1 91·92
19 20 35 35·75 21 22 27·6 53·79 19 22 15 9·39 15 25 14·6 92·54
20 20 37 46·32 21 17 4·9 54·80 20 22 17 7·61 15 15 59·3 93·14
21 20 39 56·64 21 11 36·1 55·80 21 22 19 5·59 15 6 40·5 93·73
22 20 42 6·70 21 6 1·3 56·79 22 22 21 3·35 14 57 18·1 94·31
23 20 44 16·51 21 0 20·6 57·78 23 22 23 0·87 14 47 52·3 94·89
24 20 46 26·06 S. 20 54 33·9 24 22 24 58·16 S. 14 38 22·9

[page] 9

MEAN TIME.

THE MOON'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION.

Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′. Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′.
MONDAY 13. WEDNESDAY 15.
h m s ° h m s °
0 22 24 58·16 S.14 38 22·9 95·45 0 23 55 11·52 S.6 10 8·8 114·02
1 22 26 55·23 14 28 50·2 96·01 1 23 57 1·01 5 58 44·7 114·24
2 22 28 52·08 14 19 14·2 96·56 2 23 58 50·41 5 47 19·3 114·46
3 22 30 48·70 14 9 34·8 97·10 3 0 0 39·74 5 35 ·52·5 114·67
4 22 32 45·11 13 59 52·2 97·64 4 0 2 29·00 5 24 24·5 114·87
5 22 34 41·30 13 50 6·3 98·17 5 0 4 18·19 5 12 55·3 115·07
6 22 36 37·28 13 40 17·3 98·69 6 0 6 7·32 5 1 24·8 115·27
7 22 38 33·05 13 30 25·2 99·20 7 0 7 56·38 4 49 53·2 115·45
8 22 40 28·60 13 20 30·0 99·70 8 0 9 45·39 4 38 20·5 115·64
9 22 42 23·95 13 10 31·8 100·20 9 0 11 34·34 4 26 46·7 115·81
10 22 44 19·09 13 0 30·6 100·69 10 0 13 23·24 4 15 11·8 115·98
11 22 46 14·04 12 50 26·5 101·17 11 0 15 12·10 4 3 35·9 116·14
12 22 48 8·78 12 40 19·5 101·64 12 0 17 0·91 3 51 59·1 116·30
13 22 50 3·33 12 30 9·7 102·10 13 0 18 49·68 3 40 21·3 116·45
14 22 51 57·68 12 19 57·1 102·56 14 0 20 38·42 3 28 42·5 116·60
15 22 53 51·84 12 9 41·7 103·01 15 0 22 27·12 3 17 3·0 116·74
16 22 55 45·82 11 59 23·6 103·46 16 0 24 15·80 3 5 22·5 116·87
17 22 57 39·61 11 49 2·9 103·89 17 0 26 4·45 2 53 41·3 117·00
18 22 59 33·21 11 38 39·5 104·32 18 0 27 53·08 2 41 59·3 117·12
19 23 1 26·64 11 28 13·6 104·74 19 0 29 41·70 2 30 16·6 117·23
20 23 3 19·89 11 17 45·1 105·16 20 0 31 30·30 2 18 33·2 117·34
21 23 5 12·96 11 7 14·2 105·57 21 0 33 18·90 2 6 49·2 117·45
22 23 7 5·87 10 56 40·8 105·97 22 0 35 7·49 1 55 4·5 117·54
23 23 8 58·60 S.10 46 5·0 106·36 23 0 36 56·08 S.1 43 19·2 117·64
THURSDAY 14. TUESDAY 16.
0 23 10 51·17 S.10 35 26·8 106·75 0 0 38 44·67 S.1 31 33·4 117·72
1 23 12 43·58 10 24 46·3 107·13 1 0 40 33·27 1 19 47·1 117·80
2 23 14 35·83 10 14 3·6 107·50 2 0 42 21·89 1 8 0·3 117·87
3 23 16 27·92 10 3 18·6 107·87 3 0 44 10·52 0 56 13·0 117·94
4 23 18 19·86 9 52 31·4 108·22 4 0 45 59·16 0 44 25·4 118·00
5 23 20 11·65 9 41 42·0 108·58 5 0 47 47·83 0 32 37·3 118·06
6 23 22 3·29 9 30 50·6 108·92 6 0 49 36·53 0 20 ·49·0 118·11
7 23 23 54·79 9 19 57·1 109·26 7 0 51 25·25 S.0 9 0·3 118·16
8 23 25 46·15 9 9 1·5 109·59 8 0 53 14·01 N.0 2 48·6 118·19
9 23 27 37·37 8 58 4·0 109·92 9 0 55 2·81 0 14 37·8 118·23
10 23 29 28·46 8 47 4·5 110·23 10 0 56 51·65 0 26 27·2 118·25
11 23 31 19·42 8 36 3·1 110·55 11 0 58 40·54 0 38 16·7 118·27
12 23 33 10·25 8 24 59·8 110·85 12 1 0 29·47 0 50 6·3 118·29
13 23 35 0·96 8 13 54·7 111·15 13 1 2 18·46 1 1 56·1 118·30
14 23 36 51·54 8 2 47·8 111·44 14 1 4 7·50 1 13 45·9 118·30
15 23 38 42·01 7 51 39·2 111·73 15 1 5 56·60 1 25 35·7 118·30
16 23 40 32·37 7 40 28·8 112·00 16 1 7 45·77 1 37 25·5 118·29
17 23 42 22·61 7 29 16·8 112·28 17 1 9 35·00 1 49 15·2 118·27
18 23 44 12·75 7 18 3·1 112·54 18 1 11 24·31 2 1 4·8 118·25
19 23 46 2·78 7 6 47·9 112·81 19 1 13 13·70 2 12 54·4 118·23
20 23 47 52·72 6 55 31·0 113·06 20 1 15 3·17 2 24 43·7 118·19
21 23 49 42·55 6 44 12·7 113·31 21 1 16 52·72 2 36 32·9 118·15
22 23 51 32·30 6 32 52·8 113·55 22 1 18 42·36 2 48 21·8 118·11
23 23 53 21·95 6 21 31·5 113·79 23 1 20 32·09 3 0 10·4 118·05
24 23 55 11·52 S.6 10 8·8 24 1 22 21·92 N.3 11 58·7

[page] 10

MEAN TIME.

THE MOON'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION.

Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′. Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′.
MONDAY 13. WEDNESDAY 15.
h m s ° h m s °
0 22 24 58·16 S. 14 38 22·9 95·45 0 23 55 11·52 S. 6 10 8·8 114·02
1 22 26 55·23 14 28 50·2 96·01 1 23 57 1·01 5 58 44·7 114·24
2 22 28 52·08 14 19 14·2 96·56 2 23 58 50·41 5 47 19·3 114·46
3 22 30 48·70 14 9 34·8 97·10 3 0 0 39·74 5 35 ·52·5 114·67
4 22 32 45·11 13 59 52·2 97·64 4 0 2 29·00 5 24 24·5 114·87
5 22 34 41·30 13 50 6·3 98·17 5 0 4 18·19 5 12 55·3 115·07
6 22 36 37·28 13 40 17·3 98·69 6 0 6 7·32 5 1 24·8 115·27
7 22 38 33·05 13 30 25·2 99·20 7 0 7 56·38 4 49 53·2 115·45
8 22 40 28·60 13 20 30·0 99·70 8 0 9 45·39 4 38 20·5 115·64
9 22 42 23·95 13 10 31·8 100·20 9 0 11 34·34 4 26 46·7 115·81
10 22 44 19·09 13 0 30·6 100·69 10 0 13 23·24 4 15 11·8 115·98
11 22 46 14·04 12 50 26·5 101 17 11 0 15 12·10 4 3 35·9 116·14
12 22 48 8·78 12 40 19·5 101·64 12 0 17 0·91 3 51 59·1 116·30
13 22 50 3·33 12 30 9·7 102·10 13 0 18 49·68 3 40 21·3 116·45
14 22 51 57·68 12 19 57·1 102·56 14 0 20 38·42 3 28 42·5 116·60
15 22 53 51·84 12 9 41·7 103·01 15 0 22 27·12 3 17 3·0 116·74
16 22 55 45·82 11 59 23·6 103·46 16 0 24 15·80 3 5 22·5 116·87
17 22 57 39·61 11 49 2·9 103·89 17 0 26 4·45 2 53 41·3 117·00
18 22 59 33·21 11 38 39·5 104·32 18 0 27 53·08 2 41 59·3 117·12
19 23 1 26·64 11 28 13·6 104·74 19 0 29 41·70 2 30 16·6 117·23
20 23 3 19·89 11 17 45·1 105·16 20 0 31 30·30 2 18 33·2 117·34
21 23 5 12·96 11 7 14·2 105·57 21 0 33 18·90 2 6 49·2 117·45
22 23 7 5·87 10 56 40·8 105·97 22 0 35 7·49 1 55 4·5 117·54
23 23 8 58·60 S. 10 46 5·0 106·36 23 0 36 56·08 S. 1 43 19·2 117·64
TUESDAY 14. THURSDAY 16.
0 23 10 51·17 S. 10 35 26·8 106·75 0 0 38 44·67 S. 1 31 33·4 117·72
1 23 12 43·58 10 24 46·3 107·13 1 0 40 33·27 1 19 47·1 117·80
2 23 14 35·83 10 14 3·6 107·50 2 0 42 21·89 1 8 0·3 117·87
3 23 16 27·92 10 3 18·6 107·87 3 0 44 10·52 0 56 13·0 117·94
4 23 18 19·86 9 52 31·4 108·22 4 0 45 59·16 0 44 25·4 118·00
5 23 20 11·65 9 41 42·0 108·58 5 0 47 47·83 0 32 37·3 118·06
6 23 22 3·29 9 30 50·6 108·92 6 0 49 36·53 0 20 ·49·0 118·11
7 23 23 54·79 9 19 57·1 109·26 7 0 51 25·25 S.0 9 0·3 118·16
8 23 25 46·15 9 9 1·5 109·59 8 0 53 14·01 N.0 2 48·6 118·19
9 23 27 37·37 8 58 4·0 109·92 9 0 55 2·81 0 14 37·8 118·23
10 23 29 28·46 8 47 4·5 110·23 10 0 56 51·65 0 26 27·2 118·25
11 23 31 19·42 8 36 3·1 110·55 11 0 58 40·54 0 38 16·7 118·27
12 23 33 10·25 8 24 59·8 110·85 12 1 0 29·47 0 50 6·3 118·29
13 23 35 0·96 8 13 54·7 111·15 13 1 2 18·46 1 1 56·1 118·30
14 23 36 51·54 8 2 47·8 111·44 14 1 4 7·50 1 13 45·9 118·30
15 23 38 42·01 7 51 39·2 111·73 15 1 5 56·60 1 25 35·7 118·30
16 23 40 32·37 7 40 28·8 112·00 16 1 7 45·77 1 37 25·5 118·29
17 23 42 22·61 7 29 16·8 112·28 17 1 9 35·00 1 49 15·2 118·27
18 23 44 12·75 7 18 3·1 112·54 18 1 11 24·31 2 1 4·8 118·25
19 23 46 2·78 7 6 47·9 112·81 19 1 13 13·70 2 12 54·4 118·23
20 23 47 52·72 6 55 31· 0 113·06 20 1 15 3·17 2 24 43·7 118·19
21 23 49 42·55 6 44 12·7 113·31 21 1 16 52·72 2 36 32·9 118·15
22 23 51 32·30 6 32 52·8 113·55 22 1 18 42·36 2 48 21·8 118·11
23 23 53 21·95 6 21 31·5 113·79 23 1 20 32·09 3 0 10·4 118·05
24 23 55 11·52 S. 6 10 8·8 24 1 22 21·92 N. 3 11 58·7

[page] 11

MEAN TIME.

THE MOON'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION.

Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′. Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′.
TUESDAY 21. THURSDAY 23.
h m s ° h m s °
0 4 35 30·71 N. 19 44 32·0 73·62 0 6 32 1·63 N. 23 23 41·6 11·80
1 4 37 47·56 19 51 53·8 72·63 1 6 34 35·08 23 24 52·4 10·25
2 4 40 4·82 19 59 9·6 71·63 2 6 37 8·76 23 25 53·9 8·69
3 4 42 22·47 20 6 19·3 70·61 3 6 39 42·67 23 26 46·1 7·12
4 4 44 40·52 20 13 23·0 69·57 4 6 42 16·79 23 27 28·8 5·55
5 4 46 58·97 20 20 20·4 68·53 5 6 44 51·12 23 28 2·1 3·97
6 4 49 17·83 20 27 11·6 67·47 6 6 47 25·65 23 28 25·9 2·38
7 4 51 37·07 20 33 56·4 66·40 7 6 50 0·38 23 28 40·2 0·79
8 4 53 56·72 20 40 34·8 65·32 8 6 52 35·30 23 28 45·0 0·81
9 4 56 16·76 20 47 6·7 64·22 9 6 55 10·39 23 28 40·1 2·41
10 4 58 37·20 20 53 32·0 63·11 10 6 57 45·66 23 28 25·7 4·02
11 5 0 58·04 20 59 50·6 61·98 11 7 0 21·09 23 28 1·6 5·63
12 5 3 19·26 21 6 2·5 60·85 12 7 2 56·68 23 27 27·8 7·23
13 5 5 40·88 21 12 7·6 59·70 13 7 5 32·42 23 26 44·4 8·85
14 5 8 2·89 21 18 5·8 58·53 14 7 8 8·30 23 25 51·3 10·48
15 5 10 25·29 21 23 57·0 57·36 15 7 10 44·31 23 24 48·5 12·11
16 5 12 48·08 21 29 41·2 56·17 16 7 13 20·44 23 23 35·8 13·75
17 5 15 11·25 21 35 18·2 54·97 17 7 15 56·70 23 22 13·3 15·39
18 5 17 34·80 21 40 48·0 53·75 18 7 18 33·06 23 20 41·0 17·03
19 5 19 58·74 21 46 10·5 52·52 19 7 21 9·52 23 18 58·8 18·68
20 5 22 23·05 21 51 25·6 51·28 20 7 23 46·08 23 17 6·7 20·38
21 5 24 47·73 21 56 33·3 50·03 21 7 26 22·71 23 15 4·7 21·98
22 5 27 12·78 22 1 33·5 48·76 22 7 28 59·43 23 12 52·9 23·63
23 5 29 38·21 N. 22 6 26·0 47·48 23 7 31 36·22 N. 23 10 31·1 25·29
WEDNESDAY 22. FRIDAY 24.
0 5 32 4·00 N. 22 11 10·9 46·19 0 7 34 13·06 N. 23 7 59·3 26·88
1 5 34 30·15 22 15 48·1 44·89 1 7 36 49·96 23 5 18·0 28·53
2 5 36 56·66 22 20 17·4 43·57 2 7 39 26·90 23 2 26·9 30·17
3 5 39 23·53 22 24 38·8 42·24 3 7 42 3·87 22 59 25·9 31·81
4 5 41 50·75 22 28 52·3 40·90 4 7 44 40·87 22 56 15·0 38·45
5 5 44 18·31 22 32 57·6 39·55 5 7 47 17·89 22 52 54·3 35·09
6 5 46 46·22 22 36 54·9 38·18 6 7 49 54·92 22 49 23·7 36·73
7 5 49 14·47 22 40 44·0 36·80 7 7 52 31·95 22 45 43·3 38·36
8 5 51 43·05 22 44 24·8 35· 42 8 7 55 8·98 22 41 53·2 40·00
9 5 54 11·96 22 47 57·3 34·02 9 7 57 45·99 22 37 53·2 41·63
10 5 56 41·19 22 51 21·4 32·61 10 8 0 22·98 22 33 43·4 43·25
11 5 59 10·74 22 54 37·1 31·19 11 8 2 59·94 22 29 23·9 44·87
12 6 1 40·61 22 57 44·2 29·75 12 8 5 36·87 22 24 54·7 46·50
13 6 4 10·79 23 0 42·7 28·31 13 8 8 13·75 22 20 15·7 48·11
14 6 6 41·28 23 3 32·5 26·85 14 8 10 50·57 22 15 27·0 49·72
15 6 9 12·07 23 6 13·6 25·39 15 8 13 27·33 22 10 28·7 51·32
16 6 11 43·15 23 8 45·9 23·91 16 8 16 4·03 22 5 20·8 52·92
17 6 14 14·52 23 11 9·4 22·43 17 8 18 40·65 22 0 3·3 54·51
18 6 16 46·17 23 13 24·0 20·94 18 8 21 17·19 21 54 36·2 56·09
19 6 19 18·09 23 15 29·6 19·44 19 8 23 53·63 21 48 59·7 67·66
20 6 21 50·28 23 17 26·3 17·93 20 8 26 29·98 21 43 13·7 59·23
21 6 24 22·74 23 19 13·8 16·41 21 8 29 6·23 21 37 18·3 60·79
22 6 26 55·46 23 20 52·3 14·88 22 8 31 42·36 21 31 13·6 62·34
23 6 29 28·43 23 22 21·5 13·34 23 8 34 18·38 21 24 59·5 63·89
24 6 32 1·63 N. 23 23 41·6 24 8 36 54·27 N. 21 18 36·2

[page] 12

MEAN TIME.

THE MOON'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION.

Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′. Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′.
SATURDAY 25. MONDAY 27.
h m s ° h m s °
0 8 36 54·27 N. 21 18 36·2 65·43 0 10 37 33·04 N. 13 33 17·4 124·01
1 8 39 30·03 21 12 3·6 66·96 1 10 39 57·53 13 20 53·3 124·84
2 8 42 5·65 21 5 21·8 68·48 2 10 42 21·75 13 8 24·3 125·65
3 8 44 41·13 20 58 31·0 69·99 3 10 44 45·69 12 55 50·4 126·45
4 8 47 16·46 20 51 31·0 71·49 4 10 47 9·36 12 43 11·7 127·22
5 8 49 51·63 20 44 22·1 72·98 5 10 49 32·76 12 30 28·4 127-98
6 8 52 26·64 20 37 4·2 74·46 6 10 51 55·88 12 17 40·5 128·72
7 8 55 1·48 20 29 37·5 75·93 7 10 54 18·73 12 4 48·1 129·45
8 8 57 36·15 20 22 1·9 77·38 8 10 56 41·32 11 51 51·4 130·15
9 9 0 10·64 20 14 17 6 78·83 9 10 59 3·63 11 38 50·5 130·84
10 9 2 44·94 20 6 24·7 80·26 10 11 1 25·68 11 25 45·5 131·51
11 9 5 19·05 19 58 23·1 81·69 11 11 3 47·46 11 12 36·4 132·17
12 9 7 52·96 19 50 13·0 83·10 12 11 6 8·98 10 59 23·4 132·80
13 9 10 26·67 19 41 54·4 84·50 13 11 8 30·24 10 46 6·6 133·42
14 9 13 0·18 19 33 27·4 85·88 14 11 10 51·23 10 32 46·0 134·02
15 9 15 33·47 19 24 52·1 87·26 15 11 13 11·97 10 19 21·9 134·61
16 9 18 6·56 19 16 8·5 88·62 16 11 15 32·45 10 5 54·3 135·17
17 9 20 39·42 19 7 16·8 89·96 17 11 17 52·67 9 52 23·2 135·72
18 9 23 12·05 18 58 17·1 91·29 18 11 20 12·64 9 38 48·9 136·25
19 9 25 44·46 18 49 9·3 92·61 19 11 22 32·37 9 25 11·5 136·73
20 9 28 16·65 18 39 53·6 93·92 20 11 24 51·84 9 11 30·9 137·26
21 9 30 48·59 18 30 30·1 95·21 21 11 27 11·07 8 57 47·4 137·73
22 9 33 20·30 18 20 58·9 96·48 22 11 29 30·06 8 44 1·0 138·19
23 9 35 51·76 N. 18 11 20·0 97·74 23 11 31 48·81 N. 8 30 11·8 138·64
SUNDAY 26. TUESDAY 28.
0 9 38 22·98 N. 18 1 33·6 98·98 0 11 34 7·32 N. 8 16 20·0 139·06
1 9 40 53·95 17 51 39·7 100·21 1 11 36 25·60 8 2 25·7 139·47
2 9 43 24·67 17 41 38·4 101·43 2 11 38 43·65 7 48 28·9 139·86
3 9 45 55·14 17 31 29·8 102·63 3 11 41 1·46 7 34 29·7 140·23
4 9 48 25·35 17 21 14·0 103·81 4 11 43 19·06 7 20 28·3 140·59
5 9 50 55·31 17 10 51·2 104·98 5 11 45 36·43 7 6 24·8 140·93
6 9 53 25·00 17 0 21·3 106·13 6 11 47 53·57 6 52 19·2 141·25
7 9 55 54·42 16 49 44·5 107·27 7 11 50 10·51 6 38 11·7 141·56
8 9 58 23·59 16 39 0·9 108·39 8 11 52 27·23 6 24 2·3 141·85
9 10 0 52·48 16 28 10·6 109·49 9 11 54 43·74 6 9 51·2 142·12
10 10 3 21·11 16 17 13·6 110·58 10 11 57 0·04 5 55 38·5 142·38
11 10 5 49·46 16 6 10·1 111·67 11 11 59 16·14 5 41 24·2 142·62
12 10 8 17·55 15 55 0·2 112·71 12 12 1 32·03 5 27 8·5 142·85
13 10 10 45·36 15 43 44·0 113·74 13 12 3 47·73 5 12 51·4 143·06
14 10 13 12·89 15 32 21·6 114·76 14 12 6 3·23 4 58 33·0 143·25
15 10 15 40·15 15 20 53·0 115·77 15 12 8 18·55 4 44 13·6 143·43
16 10 18 7·14 15 9 18·4 116·75 16 12 10 33·68 4 29 53·0 143·59
17 10 20 33·84 14 57 37·9 117·72 17 12 12 48·63 4 15 31·5 143·73
18 10 23 0·28 14 45 51·6 118·67 18 12 15 3·40 4 1 9·1 143·86
19 10 25 26·43 14 33 59·5 119·61 19 12 17 17·99 3 46 45·9 143·98
20 10 27 52·31 14 22 1·9 120·52 20 12 19 32·41 3 32 22·1 144·07
21 10 30 17·90 14 9 58·8 121·42 21 12 21 46·66 3 17 57·6 144·16
22 10 32 43·23 13 57 50·2 122·30 22 12 24 0·74 3 3 32·7 144·22
23 10 35 8·27 13 45 36·4 123·17 23 12 26 14·67 2 49 7·4 144·28
24 10 37 33·04 N. 13 33 17·4 24 12 28 28·44 N. 2 34 41·7

[page] 13

MEAN TIME.

THE MOON'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION.

Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′. Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′.
WEDNESDAY 29. FRIDAY 31.
h m s ° h m s °
0 12 28 28·44 N.2 34 41·7 144·31 0 14 13 39·49 S. 8 36 18·9 130·02
1 12 30 42·06 2 20 15·8 144·34 1 14 15 50·20 8 49 19·0 129·42
2 12 32 55·52 2 5 49·8 144·34 2 14 18 0·93 9 2 15·5 128·81
3 12 35 8·85 1 51 23·7 144·34 3 14 20 11·69 9 15 8·3 128·19
4 12 37 22·03 1 36 57·7 144·31 4 14 22 22·48 9 27 57·5 127·56
5 12 39 35·07 1 22 31·8 144·28 5 14 24 33·31 9 40 42·9 126·93
6 12 41 47·97 1 8 6·2 144·22 6 14 26 44·18 9 53 24·4 126·28
7 12 44 0·75 0 53 40·9 144·16 7 14 28 55·08 10 6 2·1 125·62
8 12 46 13·40 0 39 15·9 144·07 8 14 31 6·03 10 18 35·8 124·95
9 12 48 25·92 0 24 51·5 143·98 9 14 33 17·03 10 31 5·5 124·27
10 12 50 38·33 N.0 10 27·6 143·87 10 14 35 28·07 10 43 31·1 123·57
11 12 52 50·62 S.0 3 55·6 143·74 11 14 37 39·17 10 55 52·5 122·87
12 12 55 2·80 0 18 18·1 143·60 12 14 39 50·32 11 8 9·7 122·17
13 12 57 14·87 0 32 39·7 143·45 13 14 42 1·53 11 20 22·7 121·45
14 12 59 26·84 0 47 0·4 143·29 14 14 44 12·80 11 32 31·4 120·72
15 13 1 38·72 1 1 20·1 143·11 15 14 46 24·13 11 44 35·7 119·97
16 13 3 50·50 1 15 38·8 142·91 16 14 48 35·53 11 56 35·6 119·22
17 13 6 2·18 1 29 56·2 142·70 17 14 50 46·99 12 8 30·9 118·46
18 13 8 13·78 1 44 12·5 142·48 18 14 52 58·53 12 20 21·7 117·69
19 13 10 25·29 1 58 27·4 142·25 19 14 55 10·13 12 32 7·8 116·91
20 13 12 36·72 2 12 40·9 142·00 20 14 57 21·81 12 43 49·3 116·12
21 13 14 48·08 2 26 52·9 141·74 21 14 59 33·56 12 55 26·0 115·32
22 13 16 59·36 2 41 3·4 141·47 22 15 1 45·39 13 6 57·9 114·51
23 13 19 10·58 S. 2 55 12·2 141·18 23 15 3 57·30 S. 13 18 25·0 113·69
THURSDAY30. SATURDAY, FEB.1.
0 13 21 21·73 S. 3 9 19·3 140·88 0 15 6 9·29 S. 13 29 47·1
1 13 23 32·82 3 23 24·6 140·57
2 13 25 43·85 3 37 28·0 140·25
3 13 27 54·82 3 51 29·5 139·91
4 13 30 5·75 4 5 28·9 139·56
5 13 32 16·63 4 19 26·3 139·19
6 13 34 27·47 4 33 21·5 138·82
7 13 36 38·27 4 47 14·4 138·43
8 13 38 49·04 5 1 5·0 138·03
9 13 40 59·77 5 14 53·2 137·62
10 13 43 10·48 5 28 38·9 137·19
11 13 45 21·17 5 42 22·0 136·76
12 13 47 31·83 5 56 2·6 136·31
13 13 49 42·48 6 9 40·4 135·85
14 13 51 53·12 6 23 15·5 135·37
15 13 54 3·74 6 36 47·7 134·89
16 13 56 14·37 6 50 17·1 134·39
17 13 58 24·98 7 3 43·4 133·89
18 14 0 35·60 7 17 6·7 133·37
19 14 2 46·22 7 30 26·9 132·84
20 14 4 56·85 7 43 44·0 132·30
21 14 7 7·48 7 56 57·7 131·74
22 14 9 18·13 8 10 8·2 131·18
23 14 11 28·80 8 23 15·2 130·60
24 14 13 39·49 S 8 36 18·9
d h m
Last Quarter 2 4 12·6
●New Moon 9 11 10·3
First Quarter 17 14 42·8
◯Full Moon 24 22 12·1
Last Quarter 31 13 14·6
d h
Apogee 14 18
Perigee 26 16

[page] 14

MEAN TIME.

LUNAR DISTANCES.

Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Noon. P. L. of diff. IIIh. P.L. of diff. VIh. P. L. of diff. IXh. P.L. of diff.
° ° ° °
1 Pollux W. 63 52 59 2294 65 39 7 2299 67 25 8 2304 69 11 1 2310
Regulus W. 28 1 4 2310 29 46 49 2312 31 32 31 2314 33 18 10 2318
Antares E. 72 49 11 2308 71 3 23 2315 69 17 45 2321 67 32 16 2328
Mars E. 87 17 38 2505 85 36 31 2510 83 55 31 2516 82 14 40 2522
Venus E. 89 40 1 2672 88 2 44 2678 86 25 35 2685 84 48 35 2692
SUN E. 105 25 53 2593 103 46 48 2599 102 7 52 2605 100 29 4 2612
2 Pollux W. 77 58 23 2340 79 43 25 2345 81 28 19 2352 83 13 3 2359
Regulus W. 42 5 1 2340 43 50 3 2345 45 34 57 2350 47 19 44 2356
Antares E. 58 47 30 2366 57 3 7 2374 55 18 55 2383 53 34 56 2392
Mars E. 73 52 36 2554 72 12 38 2562 70 32 51 2568 68 53 12 2576
Venus E. 76 45 49 2726 75 9 43 2733 73 33 47 2741 71 58 1 2747
SUN E. 93 17 20 2645 90 39 26 2653 89 1 43 2659 87 24 8 2667
3 Pollux W. 91 54 18 2392 93 38 4 2399 95 21 40 2407 97 5 5 2413
Regulus W. 56 1 27 2387 57 45 21 2393 59 29 6 2400 61 12 41 2406
Saturn W. 16 33 1 2460 18 15 11 2455
Antares E. 44 58 24 2443 43 15 50 2454 41 33 32 2466 39 51 31 2479
Mars E. 60 37 29 2612 58 58 50 2619 57 20 21 2627 55 42 3 2634
Venus E. 64 1 34 2785 62 26 46 2792 60 52 8 2800 59 17 40 2808
SUN E. 79 18 45 2703 77 42 9 2711 76 5 44 2719 74 29 29 2726
4 Regulus W. 69 48 14 2441 71 30 51 2447 73 13 19 2455 74 55 36 2461
Saturn W. 26 46 22 2465 28 28 25 2469 30 10 22 2474 31 52 12 2480
Spica n W. 17 4 31 2819 18 38 34 2763 20 13 50 2722 21 50 1 2691
Mars E. 47 33 2 2672 45 55 45 2680 44 18 38 2688 42 41 42 2696
Venus E. 51 27 52 2847 49 54 25 2855 48 21 8 2863 46 48 1 2871
SUN E. 66 30 46 2765 64 55 32 2772 63 20 28 2781 61 45 35 2789
5 Regulus W. 83 24 33 2497 85 5 50 2505 86 46 57 2512 88 27 53 2520
Saturn W. 40 19 23 2510 42 0 23 2516 43 41 14 2522 45 21 56 2529
Spica n W. 29 58 28 2619 31 36 57 2615 33 15 31 2613 34 54 9 2612
Mars E. 34 39 37 2735 33 3 44 2743 31 28 1 2752 29 52 30 2760
Venus E. 39 5 1 2911 37 32 56 2919 36 1 1 2927 34 29 16 2935
SUN E. 53 53 42 2828 52 19 51 2836 50 46 10 2844 49 12 39 2852
6 Saturn W. 53 43 2 2565 55 22 45 2572 57 2 18 2580 58 41 41 2587
Spica n W. 43 7 16 2619 44 45 45 2624 46 24 8 2627 48 2 26 2632
Mars E. 21 57 41 2805 20 23 19 2815 18 49 10 2824 17 15 13 2833
Venus E. 26 53 12 2978 25 22 31 2986 23 52 1 2994 22 21 41 3004
SUN E. 41 27 47 2894 39 55 20 2903 38 23 5 2912 36 51 1 2920
7 Saturn W. 66 55 58 2627 68 34 17 2634 70 12 26 2643 71 50 23 2651
Spica n W. 56 12 9 2661 57 49 42 2668 59 27 5 2674 61 4 20 2681
SUN E. 29 13 29 2966 27 42 33 2975 26 11 49 2985 24 41 17 2994
11 Jupiter E. 77 58 58 2938 76 27 27 2948 74 56 9 2957 73 25 2 2966
α Arietis E. 87 29 1 3044 85 59 43 3055 84 30 38 3064 83 1 44 3074
12 SUN W. 28 55 35 3356 30 18 42 3365 31 41 39 3372 33 4 28 3380
Jupiter E. 65 52 18 3010 64 22 17 3018 62 52 27 3026 61 22 46 3035
α Arietis E. 75 40 14 3123 74 12 32 3134 72 45 3 3143 71 17 45 3154
13 SUN W. 39 56 19 3416 41 18 18 3423 42 40 9 3429 44 1 53 3434
Jupiter E. 53 56 48 3071 52 28 3 3078 50 59 26 3084 49 30 57 3091

[page] 15

MEAN TIME.

LUNAR DISTANCES.

Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Midnight. P. L. of diff. XVh. P.L. of diff. XVIIIh. P. L. of diff. XXIh. P.L. of diff.
° ° ° °
1 Pollux W. 70 56 46 2315 72 42 23 2321 74 27 52 2327 76 13 12 2333
Regulus W. 35 3 43 2321 36 49 12 2325 38 34 35 2330 40 19 51 2334
Antares E. 65 46 58 2335 64 1 49 2343 62 16 52 2350 60 32 5 2358
Mars E. 80 33 57 2528 78 53 23 2535 77 12 58 2541 75 32 42 2548
Venus E. 83 11 44 2699 81 35 2 2705 79 58 28 2712 78 22 4 2719
SUN E. 98 50 25 2618 97 11 55 2625 95 33 34 2632 93 55 22 2639
2 Pollux W. 84 57 37 2365 86 42 2 2372 88 26 17 2378 90 10 23 2386
Regulus W. 49 4 22 2362 50 48 51 2368 52 33 12 2374 54 17 24 2380
Antares E. 51 51 10 2402 50 7 38 2411 48 24 19 2421 46 41 14 2431
Mars E. 67 13 44 2583 65 34 25 2591 63 55 17 2597 62 16 18 2604
Venus E. 70 22 24 2754 68 46 56 2763 67 11 39 2769 65 36 31 2778
SUN E. 85 46 44 2674 84 9 29 2681 82 32 24 2690 80 55 30 2696
3 Pollux W. 98 48 21 2421 100 31 26 2429 102 14 20 2435 103 57 5 2443
Regulus W. 62 56 7 2413 64 39 23 2419 66 22 30 2427 68 5 27 2434
Saturn W. 19 57 28 2455 21 39 45 2455 23 22 1 2458 25 4 13 2460
Antares E. 38 9 48 2494 36 28 26 2507 34 47 23 2523 33 6 42 2541
Mars E. 54 3 54 2642 52 25 56 2649 50 48 8 2657 49 10 30 2664
Venus E. 57 43 22 2816 56 9 15 2823 54 35 17 2832 53 1 30 2838
SUN E. 72 53 24 2734 71 17 29 2742 69 41 45 2749 68 6 10 2757
4 Regulus W. 76 37 44 2469 78 19 41 2475 80 1 29 2483 81 43 6 2490
Saturn W. 33 33 54 2485 35 15 29 2491 36 56 55 2497 38 38 13 2502
Spica n W. 23 26 53 2667 25 4 17 2649 26 42 5 2637 28 20 10 2627
Mars E. 41 4 56 2703 39 28 20 2711 37 51 55 2719 36 15 40 2728
Venus E. 45 15 5 2878 43 42 18 2887 42 9 42 2894 40 37 16 2903
SUN E. 60 10 52 2796 58 36 19 2804 57 1 56 2812 55 27 44 2820
5 Regulus W. 90 8 39 2527 91 49 15 2535 93 29 40 2543 95 9 54 2550
Saturn W. 47 2 29 2536 48 42 52 2543 50 23 5 2550 52 3 9 2558
Spica n W. 36 32 48 2611 38 11 28 2612 39 50 7 2614 41 28 13 2616
Mars E. 28 17 9 2769 26 42 0 2777 25 7 2 2786 23 32 16 2795
Venus E. 32 57 42 2944 31 26 19 2952 29 55 6 2960 28 24 3 2970
SUN E. 47 39 19 2861 46 6 10 2869 44 33 11 2878 43 0 24 2886
6 Saturn W. 60 20 54 2595 61 59 56 2603 63 38 47 2610 65 17 28 2618
Spica n W. 49 40 37 2637 51 18 42 2643 52 56 39 2649 54 34 28 2655
Mars E.
Venus E. 20 51 33 3012 19 21 35 3021 17 51 48 3031 16 22 13 3039
SUN E. 35 19 8 2929 33 47 26 2938 32 15 55 2947 30 44 36 2957
7 Saturn W. 73 28 9 2660 75 5 43 2668 76 43 6 2676 78 20 18 2685
Spica n W. 62 41 25 2689 64 18 20 2696 65 55 6 2704 67 31 11 2711
SUN E.
11 Jupiter E. 71 54 7 2975 70 23 23 2985 68 52 51 2993 67 22 29 3002
α Arietis E. 81 33 2 3083 80 4 32 3093 78 36 14 3103 77 8 8 3113
12 SUN W. 34 27 7 3388 35 49 37 3395 37 11 59 3402 38 34 13 3409
Jupiter E. 59 53 16 3042 58 23 55 3050 56 54 44 3057 55 25 42 3064
α Arietis E. 69 50 41 3163 68 23 48 3174 66 57 8 3185 65 30 41 3195
13 SUN W. 45 23 31 3440 46 45 2 3445 43 6 28 3449 49 27 49 3454
Jupiter E. 48 2 36 3096 46 34 22 3102 45 6 15 3108 43 38 15 3113

[page] 16

MEAN TIME.

LUNAR DISTANCES.

Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Noon. P. L. of diff. IIIh. P. L. of diff. VIh. P. L. of diff. IXh. P. L. of diff.
° ° ° °
13 α Arietis E. 64 4 26 3206 62 38 24 3217 61 12 35 3227 59 46 58 3239
14 SUN W. 50 49 5 3458 52 10 16 3462 53 31 23 3464 54 52 27 3467
Jupiter E. 42 10 21 3118 40 42 33 3123 39 14 51 3127 37 47 14 3132
α Arietis E. 52 42 18 3298 51 18 4 3312 49 54 6 3325 48 30 23 3339
Aldebaran E. 82 29 5 3072 81 0 21 3076 79 31 42 3079 78 3 7 3082
15 SUN W. 61 37 9 3474 62 58 2 3475 64 18 54 3474 65 39 47 3473
Jupiter E. 30 30 26 3151 29 3 18 3155 27 36 15 3159 26 9 17 3163
α Arietis E. 41 36 18 3426 40 14 31 3447 38 53 8 3472 37 32 12 3498
Aldebaran E. 70 40 49 3088 69 12 25 3089 67 44 2 3088 66 15 38 3088
16 SUN W. 72 24 38 3461 73 45 46 3456 75 6 59 3453 76 28 16 3447
Fomalhaut W. 39 1 11 3565 40 20 24 3532 41 40 13 3501 43 0 36 3472
Aldebaran E. 58 53 18 3078 57 24 41 3074 55 56 0 3071 54 27 15 3066
Pollux E. 103 6 50 3089 101 38 27 3085 100 9 59 3081 98 41 26 3076
17 SUN W. 83 16 18 3415 84 38 18 3407 86 0 27 3399 87 22 45 3388
Fomalhaut W. 49 49 52 3353 51 13 2 3332 52 36 37 3313 54 0 34 3292
Aldebaran E. 47 1 57 3039 45 32 32 3031 44 2 58 3025 42 33 16 3016
Pollux E. 91 17 3 3046 89 47 47 3038 88 18 21 3031 86 48 46 3022
18 SUN W. 94 17 10 3335 95 40 41 3324 97 4 25 3310 98 28 25 3297
Fomalhaut W. 61 5 58 3199 62 32 8 3181 63 58 40 3164 65 25 32 3146
α Pegasi W. 47 5 46 3772 48 21 17 3722 49 37 41 3677 50 54 53 3633
Aldebaran E. 35 2 8 2973 33 31 21 2962 32 0 21 2954 30 29 10 2943
Pollux E. 79 18 1 2973 77 47 14 2962 76 16 14 2951 74 45 0 2939
19 SUN W. 105 32 23 3226 106 58 2 3209 108 24 0 3194 109 50 17 3177
Fomalhaut W. 72 45 15 3058 74 14 16 3040 75 43 39 3023 77 13 23 3005
α Pegasi W. 57 32 5 3442 58 53 34 3408 60 15 41 3376 61 38 25 3345
Jupiter W. 17 43 32 2981 19 14 9 2952 20 45 22 2926 22 17 8 2902
Aldebaran E. 22 50 1 2894 21 17 35 2886 19 44 58 2880 18 12 13 2874
Pollux E. 67 4 52 2875 65 32 1 2860 63 58 51 2846 62 25 23 2832
20 SUN W. 117 6 46 3091 118 35 7 3073 120 3 50 3054 121 32 56 3035
α Pegasi W. 68 40 48 3202 70 6 55 3174 71 33 35 3149 73 0 45 3124
α Arietis W.
Jupiter W. 30 3 5 2797 31 37 37 2776 33 12 36 2757 34 48 0 2738
Pollux E. 54 33 15 2756 52 57 49 2741 51 22 3 2725 49 45 56 2709
Regulus E. 90 21 20 2737 88 45 29 2719 87 9 14 2702 85 32 37 2686
21 Jupiter W. 42 51 28 2641 44 29 27 2621 46 7 53 2602 47 46 45 2583
α Arietis W. 36 46 0 2990 38 16 25 2943 39 47 49 2901 41 20 7 2860
Pollux E. 41 40 5 2631 40 1 52 2616 38 23 19 2602 36 44 26 2588
Regulus E. 77 23 43 2596 75 44 43 2580 74 5 20 2561 72 25 32 2543
Saturn E. 120 40 10 2593 119 1 5 2575 117 21 36 2656 115 41 41 2538
22 Jupiter W. 56 7 34 2490 57 49 1 2472 59 30 54 2454 61 13 12 2436
α Arietis W. 49 13 49 2689 50 50 44 2660 52 28 18 2631 54 6 31 2604
Aldebaran W. 16 37 6 2510 18 18 6 2481 19 59 46 2455 21 42 3 2431
Pollux E. 28 25 34 2531 26 45 4 2525 25 4 25 2520 23 23 40 2520
Regulus E. 64 0 17 2454 62 17 59 2437 60 35 17 2420 58 52 11 2403
Saturn E. 107 15 46 2447 105 33 18 2429 103 50 25 2412 102 7 7 2394

[page] 17

MEAN TIME.

LUNAR DISTANCES.

Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Midnight. P. L. of diff. XVh. P. L. of diff. XVIIIh. P. L. of diff. XXIh. P. L. of diff.
° ° ° °
13 α Arietis E. 58 21 35 3250 56 56 25 3261 55 31 28 3274 54 6 46 3286
14 SUN W. 56 13 28 3470 57 34 26 3472 58 55 22 3473 60 16 16 3474
Jupiter E. 36 19 43 3135 34 52 16 3140 33 24 55 3143 31 57 38 3148
α Arietis E. 47 6 57 3355 45 43 49 3371 44 20 59 3387 42 58 28 3406
Aldebaran E. 76 34 35 3083 75 6 5 3086 73 37 38 3087 72 9 13 3088
15 SUN W. 67 0 41 3472 68 21 37 3471 69 42 34 3467 71 3 35 3465
Jupiter E. 24 42 24 3168 23 15 37 3173 21 48 56 3180 20 22 23 3188
α Arietis E. 36 11 45 3527 34 51 51 3559 33 32 32 3596 32 13 53 3638
Aldebaran E. 64 47 14 3087 63 18 49 3085 61 50 21 3083 60 21 51 3081
16 SUN W. 77 49 39 3442 79 11 8 3436 80 32 44 3430 81 54 27 3423
Fomalhaut W. 44 21 31 3447 45 42 55 3421 47 4 48 3398 48 27 7 3375
Aldebaran E. 52 58 24 3061 51 29 27 3056 50 0 24 3051 48 31 14 3045
Pollux E. 97 12 47 3071 95 44 2 3065 94 15 10 3059 92 46 10 3053
17 SUN W. 88 45 15 3379 90 7 55 3368 91 30 48 3358 92 53 52 3346
Fomalhaut W. 55 24 55 3273 56 49 38 3254 58 14 43 3236 59 40 10 3218
Aldebaran E. 41 3 23 3009 39 33 21 3000 38 3 8 2990 36 32 43 2982
Pollux E. 85 19 0 3013 83 49 3 3003 82 18 54 2994 80 48 34 2984
18 SUN W. 99 52 40 3284 101 17 10 3270 102 41 57 3255 104 7 1 3240
Fomalhaut W. 66 52 46 3129 68 20 21 3110 69 48 18 3093 71 16 36 3076
α Pegasi W. 52 12 52 3591 53 31 37 3551 54 51 5 3513 56 11 15 3477
Aldebaran E. 28 57 45 2934 27 26 9 2923 25 54 19 2913 24 22 16 2903
Pollux E. 73 13 30 2927 71 41 45 2913 70 9 44 2901 68 37 27 2887
19 SUN W. 111 16 54 3161 112 43 50 3143 114 11 8 3126 115 38 46 3108
Fomalhaut W. 78 43 30 2988 80 13 58 2970 81 44 49 2952 83 16 2 2935
α Pegasi W. 63 1 45 3314 64 25 40 3285 65 50 9 3256 67 15 12 3228
Jupiter W. 23 49 24 2880 25 22 9 2859 26 55 21 2838 28 29 0 2818
Aldebaran E.
Pollux E. 60 51 37 2817 59 17 31 2802 57 43 6 2786 56 8 20 2772
20 SUN W.
α Pegasi W. 74 28 25 3099 75 56 36 3076 77 25 15 3052 78 54 23 3030
α Arietis W. 30 55 37 3221 32 21 21 3155 33 48 24 3096 35 16 39 3042
Jupiter W. 36 23 50 2718 38 0 6 2699 39 36 47 2679 41 13 55 2661
Pollux E. 48 9 28 2693 46 32 38 2678 44 55 28 2662 43 17 57 2646
Regulus E. 83 55 38 2668 82 18 15 2650 80 40 28 2632 79 2 17 2615
21 Jupiter W. 49 26 3 2564 51 5 47 2546 52 45 57 2527 54 26 33 2509
α Arietis W. 42 53 17 2821 44 27 17 2786 46 2 3 2751 47 37 35 2720
Pollux E. 35 5 14 2575 33 25 44 2562 31 45 57 2549 30 5 52 2540
Regulus E. 70 45 18 2525 69 4 40 2507 67 23 37 2490 65 42 9 2472
Saturn E. 114 1 21 2520 112 20 36 2502 110 39 25 2483 108 57 48 2465
22 Jupiter W. 62 55 56 2419 64 39 4 2401 66 22 37 2384 68 6 35 2368
α Arietis W. 55 45 20 2578 57 24 45 2553 59 4 44 2530 60 45 15 2507
Aldebaran W. 23 24 54 2409 25 8 16 2387 26 52 9 2367 28 36 31 2348
Pollux E. 21 42 54 2524 20 2 14 2535 18 21 49 2553 16 41 50 2587
Regulus E. 57 8 40 2385 55 24 46 2370 53 40 28 2354 51 55 47 2338
Saturn E. 100 23 24 2377 98 39 16 2360 96 54 44 2343 95 9 47 2326

[page] 18

MEAN TIME.

LUNAR DISTANCES.

Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Noon. P. L. of diff. IIIh. P. L. of diff. VIh. P. L. of diff. IXh. P. L. of diff.
° ° ° °
23 Jupiter W. 69 50 56 2351 71 35 41 2335 73 20 49 2320 75 6 19 2304
α Arietis W. 62 26 19 2485 64 7 53 2465 65 49 56 2444 67 32 28 2425
Aldebaran W. 30 21 20 2330 32 6 36 2311 33 52 19 2295 35 38 26 2278
Regulus E. 50 10 43 2324 48 25 18 2308 46 39 30 2294 44 53 21 2280
Saturn E. 93 24 26 2311 91 38 42 2295 89 52 35 2279 88 6 5 2264
Spica n E. 104 10 24 2343 102 25 27 2326 100 40 6 2311 98 54 22 2295
24 Jupiter W. 83 59 13 2236 85 46 47 2223 87 34 40 2212 89 22 50 2201
Aldebaran W. 44 34 50 2205 46 23 10 2192 48 11 50 2179 50 0 49 2168
Regulus E. 35 57 47 2220 34 9 49 2211 32 21 37 2202 30 33 12 2194
Saturn E. 79 8 14 2195 77 19 39 2184 75 30 47 2172 73 41 37 2161
Spica n E. 90 0 19 2227 88 12 31 2214 86 24 24 2202 84 36 0 2192
25 Jupiter W. 98 27 31 2155 100 17 7 2147 102 6 54 2140 103 56 52 2134
Aldebaran W. 59 9 45 2119 61 0 15 2112 62 50 56 2104 64 41 49 2098
Saturn E. 64 31 54 2114 62 41 16 2107 60 50 28 2100 58 59 29 2094
Spica n E. 75 30 15 2147 73 40 27 2141 71 50 30 2134 70 0 22 2129
26 Jupiter W. 113 8 33 2115 114 59 15 2113 116 49 54 2112 118 40 35 2111
Aldebaran W. 73 58 18 2076 75 49 54 2074 77 41 33 2072 79 33 15 2072
Pollux W. 30 3 2 2140 31 53 0 2131 33 43 12 2124 35 33 35 2118
Saturn E. 49 42 38 2075 47 51 0 2073 45 59 19 2072 44 7 37 2072
Spica n E. 60 48 8 2115 58 57 31 2113 57 6 52 2114 55 16 14 2115
27 Pollux W. 44 47 5 2107 46 37 54 2107 48 28 42 2109 50 19 28 2111
Saturn E. 34 49 21 2081 32 57 53 2086 31 6 32 2091 29 15 19 2097
Spica n E. 46 4 4 2136 44 14 0 2143 42 24 7 2153 40 34 28 2162
Antares E. 91 53 53 2103 90 2 58 2105 88 12 7 2109 86 21 22 2113
Mars E.
28 Pollux W. 59 32 1 2134 61 22 9 2140 63 12 7 2147 65 1 55 2155
Regulus W. 23 40 13 2159 25 29 42 2161 27 19 9 2164 29 8 31 2169
Saturn E. 20 2 15 2149 18 12 30 2165
Spica n E. 31 30 45 2239 29 43 15 2262 27 56 19 2288 26 10 2 2318
Antares E. 77 9 30 2143 75 19 37 2151 73 29 56 2160 71 40 28 2169
Mars E. 111 43 45 2336 109 58 38 2344 108 13 42 2351 106 28 57 2361
29 Pollux W. 74 7 50 2198 75 56 20 2208 77 44 35 2219 79 32 35 2229
Regulus W. 38 13 24 2200 40 1 51 2210 41 50 4 2219 43 38 4 2229
Antares E. 62 36 42 2220 60 48 44 2233 59 1 5 2244 57 13 43 2258
Mars E. 97 48 34 2410 96 5 13 2420 94 22 7 2431 92 39 17 2443
SUN E. 123 30 29 2500 121 49 15 2510 120 8 16 2522 118 27 33 2533
30 Regulus W. 52 34 17 2282 54 20 43 2294 56 6 52 2305 57 52 44 2317
Saturn W.
Antares E. 48 21 52 2328 46 36 33 2344 44 51 37 2360 43 7 4 2377
Mars E. 84 9 18 2505 82 28 11 2517 80 47 21 2530 79 6 49 2543
SUN E. 110 8 5 2595 108 29 3 2608 106 50 19 2621 105 11 53 2634
31 Regulus W. 66 37 43 2378 68 21 49 2390 70 5 38 2403 71 49 8 2415
Saturn W. 23 30 2 2389 25 13 53 2398 26 57 31 2408 28 40 54 2418
Antares E. 34 30 48 2475 32 48 59 2498 31 7 43 2522 29 27 0 2550
Mars E. 70 48 43 2609 69 10 0 2623 67 31 36 2636 65 53 30 2650
SUN E. 97 4 12 2702 95 27 35 2716 93 51 16 2730 92 15 16 2743

[page] 19

MEAN TIME.

LUNAR DISTANCES.

Days of the month. Star's Name and Position. Midnight. P.L. of diff. XVh. P.L. of diff. XVIIIh. P.L. of diff. XXIh. P. L. of diff.
° ° ° °
23 Jupiter W. 76 52 12 2290 78 38 26 2275 80 25 2 2262 82 11 58 2249
α Arietis W. 69 15 27 2406 70 58 53 2389 72 42 43 2372 74 26 58 2366
Aldebaran W. 37 24 58 2262 39 11 53 2247 40 59 10 2233 42 46 49 2218
Regulus E. 43 6 52 2266 41 20 3 2254 39 32 55 2241 37 45 29 2231
Saturn E. 86 19 13 2249 84 31 59 2235 82 44 24 2222 80 56 29 2203
Spica n E. 97 8 15 2281 95 21 47 2266 93 34 58 2252 91 47 48 2239
24 Jupiter W. 91 11 16 2190 92 59 59 2181 94 48 56 2171 96 38 7 2163
Aldebaran W. 51 50 5 2157 53 39 37 2147 55 29 25 2137 57 19 28 2128
Regulus E. 28 44 35 2187 26 55 48 2183 25 6 55 2181 23 17 59 2182
Saturn E. 71 52 10 2151 70 2 28 2140 68 12 30 2132 66 22 19 2122
Spica n E. 82 47 20 2182 80 58 25 2172 79 9 15 2163 77 19 51 2155
25 Jupiter W. 105 47 0 2129 107 37 15 2124 109 27 37 2120 111 18 5 2117
Aldebaran W. 66 32 51 2092 68 24 2 2087 70 15 21 2083 72 6 46 2079
Saturn E. 57 8 21 2089 55 17 5 2085 53 25 42 2081 51 34 13 2077
Spica n E. 68 10 7 2124 66 19 45 2120 64 29 17 2117 62 38 44 2115
26 Jupiter W.
Aldebaran W. 81 24 58 2071 83 16 42 2072 85 8 25 2072 87 0 7 2074
Pollux W. 37 24 6 2113 39 14 45 2110 41 5 29 2108 42 56 16 2107
Saturn E. 42 15 54 2072 40 24 12 2073 38 32 31 2075 36 40 54 2078
Spica n E. 53 25 38 2118 51 35 6 2120 49 44 38 2125 47 54 17 2130
27 Pollux W. 52 10 10 2114 54 0 48 2118 55 51 19 2122 57 41 44 2128
Saturn E. 27 24 16 2104 25 33 23 2113 23 42 44 2124 21 52 21 2135
Spica n E. 38 45 3 2174 36 55 56 2187 35 7 9 2202 33 18 44 2219
Antares E. 84 30 43 2118 82 40 11 2124 80 49 48 2130 78 59 34 2136
Mars E. 118 45 49 2311 117 0 6 2316 115 14 30 2322 113 29 3 2328
28 Pollux W. 66 51 31 2162 68 40 56 2171 70 30 7 2179 72 19 6 2189
Regulus W. 30 57 46 2172 32 46 56 2178 34 35 56 2185 36 24 46 2193
Saturn E.
Spica n E. 24 24 29 2356 22 39 51 2401 20 56 17 2455 19 14 0 2524
Antares E. 69 51 13 2178 68 2 12 2188 66 13 26 2198 64 24 56 2209
Mars E. 104 44 26 2369 103 0 7 2380 101 16 2 2389 99 32 11 2398
29 Pollux W. 81 20 19 2241 83 7 46 2252 84 54 57 2263 86 41 51 2276
Regulus W. 45 25 49 2238 47 13 20 2249 49 0 35 2260 50 47 34 2270
Antares E. 55 26 41 2270 53 39 58 2284 51 53 35 2298 50 7 33 2313
Mars E. 90 56 43 2455 89 14 26 2467 87 32 26 2480 85 50 44 2491
SUN E. 116 47 6 2545 115 6 55 2558 113 27 2 2569 111 47 25 2582
30 Regulus W. 59 38 19 2828 61 23 37 2841 63 8 37 2353 64 53 19 2866
Saturn W. 16 32 57 2364 18 17 24 2367 20 1 46 2373 21 45 59 2380
Antares E. 41 22 56 2394 39 39 13 2413 37 55 57 2432 36 13 8 2453
Mars E. 77 26 35 2556 75 46 40 2569 74 7 2 2583 72 27 43 2596
SUN E. 103 33 44 2648 101 55 54 2661 100 18 22 2675 98 41 8 2688
31 Regulus w. 73 32 21 2428 75 15 16 2440 76 57 54 2453 78 40 14 2465
Saturn W. 30 24 3 2429 32 6 56 2440 33 49 34 2450 35 31 57 2462
Antares E. 27 46 56 2580 26 7 33 2613 24 28 56 2652 22 51 11 2695
Mars E. 64 15 43 2663 62 38 13 2676 61 1 1 2690 59 24 7 2703
SUN E. 90 39 33 2757 89 4 8 2771 87 29 2 2784 85 54 13 2798

[page] 20

This Table represents, at 7h after Mean Noon of each day of the month, the relative positions of Jupiter and his Satellites, as they would appear (disregarding their latitudes) in the focus of a telescope that inverts objects. Jupiter is indicated by the white circles (O) in the centre of the page; —the Satellites by points. The numerals 1, 2, 3, or 4, annexed to the points, serve to distinguish the Satellites from each other; and their positions are such as to indicate the directions of the Satellites motions, which are in all cases to be considered as towards the numerals. When a Satellite is at its greatest elongation, the point is placed above or below the centre of the numeral. A white circle (O) at the left or right hand of the page, denotes that the Satellite placed by the side of it is on the disc of Jupiter, and black circle (● that it is either behind the disc, or in the shadow, of Jupiter.

[page] 21

ECLIPSES OF THE SATELLITES OF JUPITER.

SATELLITE. Days of the Month. Mean Time. Sidereal Time. PHASES as seen in a Telescope that inverts.
h m s h m s
I. 1 1 15 31·8 19 58 21·7 Em.
2 19 44 34·1 14 34 22·8 Em.
4 14 13 32·8 9 10 20·2 Em.
6* 8 42 34·9 3 46 21·0 Em.
8 3 11 33·1 22 22 18·0 Em.
9 21 40 36·4 16 58 20·0 Em.
11 16 9 34·0 11 34 16·3 Em.
13* 10 38 37·6 6 10 18·7 Em.
15* 5 7 35·9 0 46 15·7 Em.
16 23 36 39·2 19 22 17·7 Em.
18 18 5 37·2 13 58 14·5 Em.
20 12 34 39·8 8 34 15·8 Em.
22* 7 3 38·4 3 10 13·2 Em.
24 1 32 41·3 21 46 14·9 Em.
25 20 1 40·1 16 22 12·3 Em.
27 14 30 42·6 10 58 13·6 Em.
29* 8 59 41·0 5 34 10·7 Em.
31 3 28 43·7 0 10 12·2 Em.
II. 3* 12 14 20·0 7 6 51·2 Im.
3 14 32 38·3 9 25 32·2 Em.
7 1 32 25·2 20 38 57·2 Im.
7 3 50 36·8 22 57 31·5 Em.
10 14 50 28·3 10 11 1·0 Im.
10 17 8 33·2 12 29 28·6 Em.
14 4 8 30·6 23 43 4·1 Im.
14* 6 26 28·1 2 1 24·3 Em.
17 17 26 33·0 13 15 7·3 Im.
17 19 44 24·1 15 33 21·1 Em.
21* 6 44 34·5 2 47 9·6 Im.
21* 9 2 19·2 5 5 16·9 Em.
24 20 2 32·1 16 19 7·9 Im.
24 22 20 13·0 18 37 11·5 Em.
28* 9 20 33·3 5 51 9·9 Im.
28 11 38 8·0 8 9 7·2 Em.
31 22 38 32·3 19 23 9·7 Im.
32 0 56 0·1 21 41 0·0 Em.
III. 6 20 52 19·8 15 58 5·8 Im.
6 23 1 50·7 18 7 58·0 Em.
14 0 54 36·0 20 28 37·7 Im.
14 3 3 46·5 22 38 9·4 Em.
21 4 56 54·8 0 59 12·2 Im.
21* 7 5 47·8 3 8 26·3 Em.
28* 8 59 44·5 5 30 17·7 Im.
28* 11 8 21·4 7 39 15·7 Em.

[page] 22

APPROXIMATE SIDEREAL TIME

OF THE

OCCULTATIONS OF JUPITER'S SATELLITES BY JUPITER,

AND OF THE

TRANSITS OF THE SATELLITES AND THEIR SHADOWS OVER THE DISC OF THE PLANET.

Satellite. OCCULTATIONS. TRANSITS OF SATELLITES. TRANSITS OP SHADOWS.
Immersion. Emersion. Ingress. Egress. Ingress. Egress.
d h m d h m d h m d h m d h m d h m
I. 2 11 3 1 13 46 1 16 2 1 15 11 1 17 19
4* 5 39 3 8 21 3 10 37 3 9 47 3 11 55
6* 0 14 5* 2 56 5* 5 13 5* 4 22 5* 6 31
7 18 50 7 21 32 7 23 49 7 22 58 7* 1 7
9 13 25 In 8 16 8 8 18 24 8 17 34 9 19 42
11 8 1 10 10 43 10 13 0 10 12 10 10 14 18
13* 2 37 12* 5 19 12* 7 36 12* 6 46 12 8 54
15 21 13 the 14 23 55 14* 2 12 14* 1 22 14* 3 30
16 15 49 15 18 31 16 20 48 16 19 57 16 22 6
18 10 25 17 13 7 17 15 24 17 14 33 17 16 41
20* 5 1 Shadow. 19 7 43 19 10 0 19 9 9 19 11 17
22 23 37 21* 2 19 21* 4 36 21* 3 45 21* 5 53
23 18 13 23 20 55 23 23 12 23 22 21 23 0 29
25 12 49 24 15 31 24 17 48 24 16 56 24 19 5
27* 7 26 26 10 8 26 12 24 26 11 32 26 13 41
29* 2 2 28* 4 44 28* 7 1 28* 6 8 28 8 16
30 20 39 30 23 20 30 1 37 30 0 44 30* 2 52
31 19 20 32 21 28
II. 3* 4 19 3* 6 57 5 23 4 5* 1 42 1 12 8 1 14 27
6 17 49 7 20 27 8 12 34 8 15 12 5* 1 41 5* 4 0
10* 7 19 10 9 58 12* 2 5 12* 4 43 8 15 15 8 17 34
14 20 50 14 23 29 15 15 36 15 18 15 12* 4 48 12* 7 7
17 10 22 17 13 1 19* 5 8 19 7 47 15 18 22 16 20 41
21 23 54 21* 2 33 22 18 41 23 21 20 19 7 56 19 10 14
24 13 27 24 16 6 26 8 14 26 10 53 23 21 30 23 23 48
28* 3 0 28* 5 40 30 21 47 30 0 37 26 11 3 26 13 21
31 16 34 31 19 13 30 0 37 30* 2 55
III. 6 10 28 6 12 51 10* 0 40 10* 3 5 3* 1 39 3* 3 48
13 14 53 13 17 19 17* 5 8 17* 7 34 10* 6 10 10 8 19
20 19 23 21 21 50 24 9 40 24 12 8 17 10 40 17 12 50
28 23 58 28* 2 26 31 14 17 31 16 45 24 15 11 24 17 20
31 19 41 32 21 50

[page] 23

Days of the Month. For correcting the Places of the Fixed Stars. Mean Time of Transit of the First Point of Aries. Mean Equinoctial Time, adding 0d·745186. From Mean Noon of January 1.
At Mean Midnight, Days of the Year. Fractions of the Year.
Logarithms of
A B C D Days.
h m s
1 - 0·5590 + 1·3005 - 9·5223 + 0·1202 5 16 30·54 284 0 ·000
2 0 5964 1·2989 9·5177 0 1148 5 12 34·63 285 1 ·003
3 0·6306 1·2971 9·5130 0·1092 5 8 38·72 286 2 ·005
4 - 0·6623 + 1·2952 - 9·5083 + 0·1032 5 4 42·81 287 3 ·008
5 0·6916 1·2932 9·5036 0·0969 5 0 46·90 288 4 ·011
6 0·7190 1·2910 9·4988 0·0904 4 56 50·98 289 5 ·014
7 - 0·7446 + 1·2887 - 9·4940 + 0·0836 4 52 55·07 290 6 ·016
8 0·7687 1·2862 9·4892 0·0764 4 48 59·16 291 7 ·019
9 0·7913 1·2836 9·4844 0·0689 4 45 3·25 292 8 ·022
10 - 0·8127 + 1·2808 - 9·4796 + 0·0611 4 41 7·34 293 9 ·025
11 0·8330 1·2778 9·4747 0·0529 4 37 11·43 294 10 ·027
12 0·8522 1·2747 9·4698 0·0444 4 33 15·52 295 11 ·030
13 - 0·8705 + 1·2715 - 9·4648 + 0·0355 4 29 19·60 296 12 ·033
14 0·8879 1·2681 9·4598 0·0262 4 25 23·69 297 13 ·036
15 0·9045 1·2645 9·4548 0·0165 4 21 27·78 298 14 ·038
16 - 0·9204 + 1·2607 - 9·4498 + 0·0065 4 17 31·87 299 15 ·041
17 0·9355 1·2568 9·4448 9·9960 4 13 35·96 300 16 ·044
18 0·9500 1·2527 9·4397 9·9851 4 9 40·05 301 17 ·047
19 - 0·9640 + 1·2484 - 9·4347 + 9·9737 4 5 44·14 302 18 ·049
20 0·9773 1·2439 9·4296 9·9618 4 1 48·23 303 19 ·052
21 0·9901 1·2393 9·4245 9·9495 3 57 52·32 304 20 ·055
22 - 1·0024 + 1·2345 - 9·4194 + 9·9367 3 53 56·41 305 21 ·058
23 1·0142 1·2295 9·4143 9·9233 3 50 0·50 306 22 ·060
24 1·0256 1·2242 9·4092 9·9094 3 46 4·59 307 23 ·063
25 - 1·0365 + 1·2188 - 9·4040 + 9·8948 3 42 8·68 308 24 ·066
26 1·0471 1·2132 9·3989 9·8797 3 38 12·76 309 25 ·068
27 1·0573 1·2074 9·3937 9·8638 3 34 16·85 310 26 ·071
28 - 1·0670 + 1·2013 - 9·3886 + 9·8473 3 30 20·94 311 27 ·074
29 1·0765 1·1951 9·3834 9·8300 3 26 25·03 312 28 ·077
30 1·0856 1·1886 9·3782 9·8119 3 22 29·12 313 29 ·079
31 1 0944 1·1818 9·3730 9·7930 3 18 33·21 314 30 ·082
32 - 1·1028 + 1·1749 - 9·3678 + 9·7731 3 14 37·30 315 31 ·085

[page] 24

AT APPARENT NOON.

Days of the Week. Days of the Month. THE SUN'S Sidereal Time of the Semidiam. passing the Meridian.* Equation of Time, to be added to Apparent Time. Diff for 1 hour.
Right Ascension. Diff. for 1 hour. Declination. Diff for 1 hour.
h m s s ° m s m s s
Sat. 1 20 58 47·34 10·173 S. 17 8 41·2 42·98 1 8·20 13 54·34 0·315
Sun. 2 21 2 51·50 10·140 16 51 29·8 43·71 1 8·08 14 1·91 0·283
Mon. 3 21 6 54·86 10·105 16 34 0·7 44·43 1 7·97 14 8·70 0·249
Tues. 4 21 10 57·39 10·073 16 16 14·3 45·14 1 7·85 14 14·67 0·216
Wed. 5 21 14 59·14 10·039 15 58 11·0 45·82 1 7·74 14 19·85 0·181
Thur. 6 21 19 0·07 10·005 15 39 51·3 46·49 1 7·62 14 24·20 0·148
Frid. 7 21 23 0·19 9·973 15 21 15·5 47·15 1 7·51 14 27·75 0·116
Sat. 8 21 26 59·53 9·938 15 2 24·0 47·77 1 7·39 14 30·53 0·082
Sun. 9 21 30 58·05 9·905 14 43 17·5 48·39 1 7·28 14 32·50 0·049
Mon. 10 21 34 55·78 9·872 14 23 56·1 48·99 1 7·17 14 33·67 0·015
Tues. 11 21 38 52·71 9·840 14 4 20·4 49·57 1 7·06 14 34·04 0·016
Wed. 12 21 42 48·88 9·807 13 44 30·8 50·13 1 6·95 14 33·66 0·049
Thur. 13 21 46 44·25 9·775 13 24 27·7 50·67 1 6·84 14 32·48 0·081
Frid. 14 21 50 38·86 9·744 13 4 11·6 51·20 1 6·73 14 30·54 0·112
Sat. 15 21 54 32·72 9·712 12 43 42·8 51·70 1 6·63 14 27·85 0·144
Sun. 16 21 58 25·81 9·682 12 23 1·9 52·19 1 6·53 14 24·39 0·174
Mon. 17 22 2 18·17 9·652 12 2 9·3 52·67 1 6·43 14 20·21 0·204
Tues. 18 22 6 9·81 9·622 11 41 5·3 53·12 1 6·33 14 15·32 0·235
Wed. 19 22 10 0·73 9·593 11 19 50·4 53·56 1 6·23 14 9·69 0·262
Thur. 20 22 13 50·96 9·565 10 58 25·0 53·98 1 6·13 14 3·40 0·291
Frid. 21 22 17 40·53 9·538 10 36 49·5 54·38 1 6·04 13 56·42 0·318
Sat. 22 22 21 29·44 9·511 10 15 4·3 54·78 1 5·94 13 48·80 0·344
Sun. 23 22 25 17·71 9·485 9 53 9·7 55·15 1 5·85 13 40·54 0·370
Mon. 24 22 29 5·37 9·460 9 31 6·1 55·50 1 5·76 13 31·66 0·395
Tues. 25 22 32 52·42 9·437 9 8·54 ·2 55·85 1 5·68 13 22·19 0·418
Wed. 26 22 36 38·90 9·413 8 46 33·9 56·17 1 5·59 13 12·16 0·443
Thur. 27 22 40 24·82 9·391 8 24 5·9 56·47 1 5·51 13 1·54 0·464
Frid. 28 22 44 10·20 9·369 8 1 30·6 56·77 1 5·43 12 50·40 0·485
Sat. 29 22 47 55·06 S. 7 38 48·1 1 5·36 12 38·75

* Mean Time of the Semidiameter passing may be found by subtracting 0d·19 from the Sidereal Time

[page] 25

AT MEAN NOON.

Days of the Week. Days of the Month. THE SUN'S Equation of Time, to be added to Apparent Time. Sidereal Time.
Right Ascension. Declination. Semidiam.*
h m s ° m s h m s
Sat. 1 20 58 44·98 S. 17 8 51·1 16 14·8 13 54·26 20 44 50·72
Sun. 2 21 2 49·12 16 51 39·9 16 14·6 14 1·84 20 48 47·28
Mon. 3 21 6 52·47 16 34 11·1 16 14·5 14 8·64 20 52 43·83
Tues. 4 21 10 55·00 16 16 24·9 16 14·3 14 14·61 20 56 40·39
Wed. 5 21 14 56·74 15 58 21·9 16 14·1 14 19·80 21 0 36·94
Thur. 6 21 18 57·66 15 40 2·4 16 14·0 14 24·16 21 4 33·50
Frid. 7 21 22 57·78 15 21 26·8 16 13·8 14 27·72 21 8 30·06
Sat 8 21 26 57·12 15 2 35·5 16 13·6 14 30·51 21 12 26·61
Sun. 9 21 30 55·65 14 43 29·1 16 13·4 14 32·48 21 16 23·17
Mon. 10 21 34 53·38 14 24 7·9 16 13·2 14 33·66 21 20 19·72
Tues. 11 21 38 50·32 14 4 32·4 16 13·1 14 34·04 21 24 16·28
Wed. 12 21 42 46·50 13 44 42·9 16 12·9 14 33·67 21 28 12·83
Thur. 13 21 46 41·88 13 24 39·9 16 12·7 14 32·50 21 32 9·38
Frid. 14 21 50 36·50 13 4 23·9 16 12·5 14 30·56 21 36 5·94
Sat 15 21 54 30·37 12 43 55·2 16 12·3 14 27·88 21 40 2·49
Sun. 16 21 58 23·48 12 23 14·4 16 12·1 14 24·43 21 43 59·05
Mon. 17 22 2 15·86 12 2 21·8 16 11·9 14 20·26 21 47 55·60
Tues. 18 22 6 7·52 11 41 17·9 16 11·7 14 15·37 21 51 52·15
Wed. 19 22 9 58·46 11 20 3·0 16 11·5 14 9·75 21 55 48·71
Thur. 20 22 13 48·72 10 58 37·6 16 11·2 14 3·46 21 59 45·26
Frid. 21 22 17 38·31 10 37 2·1 16 11·0 13 56·49 22 3 41·82
Sat. 22 22 21 27·25 10 15 16·8 16 10·8 13 48·88 22 7 38·37
Sun. 23 22 25 15·54 9 53 22·2 16 10·6 13 40·62 22 11 34·92
Mon. 24 22 29 3·23 9 31 18·6 16 10·3 13 31·75 22 15 31·48
Tues. 25 22 32 50·31 9 9 6·6 16 10·1 13 22·28 22 19 28·03
Wed. 26 22 36 36·83 8 46 46·2 16 9·9 13 12·25 22 23 24·58
Thur. 27 22 40 22·78 8 24 18·1 16 9·6 13 1·64 22 27 21·14
Frid. 28 22 44 8·19 8 1 42·7 16 9·4 12 50·50 22 31 17·69
Sat. 29 22 47 53·09 S. 7 39 0·1 16 9·1 12 38·85 22 35 14·24

* The Semidiameter for Apparent Noon may be assumed the same as that for Mean Noon.

[page] 26

MEAN TIME.

Days of the Month. THE SUN'S Logarithm of the Radius Vector of the Earth. THE MOON'S
Longitude. Latitude. Semidiameter. Horizontal Parallax.
Noon. Noon. Noon. Noon. Midnight. Noon. Midnight.
°
1 312 13 11·9 N.0·79 9·9937666 15 49·4 15 44·0 58 4·0 57 44·1
2 313 14 2·6 0·71 9·9938378 15 38·7 15 33·7 57 24·9 57 6·3
3 314 14 52·5 0·59 9·9939107 15 28·7 15 24·1 56 48·2 56 31·1
4 315 15 41·3 0·47 9·9939852 15 19·7 15 15·4 56 15·0 55 59·4
5 316 16 29·2 0·35 9·9940612 15 11·5 15 7·7 55 44·9 55 31·1
6 317 17 15·8 0·23 9·9941386 15 4·2 15 0·9 55 18·0 55 6·0
7 318 18 1·4 0·12 9·9942173 14 57·7 14 54·9 54 54·5 54 43·9
8 319 18 45·8 N.0·01 9·9942971 14 52·3 14 49·9 54 34·4 54 25·7
9 320 19 28·8 S.0·07 9·9943781 14 47·8 14 46·0 54 18·0 54 11·5
10 321 20 10·3 0·15 9·9944602 14 44·6 14 43·5 54 6·2 54 2·3
11 322 20 50·3 0·18 9·9945434 14 42·8 14 42·6 53 59·8 53 59·1
12 323 21 28·9 0·19 9·946278 14 42·9 14 43·7 54 0·1 54 3·0
13 324 22 5·7 0·17 9·9947134 14 45·1 14 47·0 54 8·0 54 15·1
14 325 22 40·8 0·13 9·9948003 14 49·6 14 52·8 54 24·5 54 36·3
15 326 23 14·3 S. 0·06 9·9948885 14 56·7 15 1·3 54 50·5 55 7·3
16 327 23 45·9 N.0·03 9·9949782 15 6·4 15 12·2 55 26·2 55 47·6
17 328 24 15·6 0·14 9·9950693 15 18·6 15 25·5 56 11·1 56 36·4
18 329 24 43·5 0·26 9·9951620 15 33·0 15 40·6 57 3·7 57 31·8
19 330 25 9·5 0·39 9·9952565 15 48·5 15 56·4 58 0·7 58 29·9
20 331 25 33·8 0·50 9·9953528 16 4·3 16 11·8 58 58·6 59 26·3
21 332 25 56·2 0·62 9·9954508 16 18·8 16 25·2 59 52·1 60 15·3
22 333 26 16·9 0·71 9·9955506 16 30·6 16 35·0 60 35·4 60 51·5
23 334 26 35·8 0·79 9·9956524 16 38·4 16 40·4 61 3·7 61 11·1
24 335 26 53·1 0·85 9·9957560 16 41·1 16 40·4 61 13·6 61 11·4
25 336 27 8·4 0·86 9·9958613 16 38·6 16 35·5 61 4·4 60 53·1
26 337 27 22·4 0·86 9·9959683 16 31·3 16 26·2 60 37·8 60 19·0
27 338 27 34·6 0·84 9·9960770 16 20·3 16 13·9 59 57·4 59 33·8
28 339 27 45·1 0·77 9·9961872 16 7·0 15 59·9 59 8·6 58 42·5
29 340 27 54·3 N.0·69 9·9962988 15 52·7 15 45·7 58 16·3 57 50·3

[page] 27

MEAN TIME.
Days of the Week. Days of the Month. THE MOON'S
Longitude. Latitude. Age.
Noon. Midnight. Noon. Midnight. Noon. Meridian Passage.
° ° ° ° d h m
Sat. 1 227 54 15·6 234 40 19·7 N. 3 50 9·4 N. 3 23 45·8 22·5 19 0·3
Sun. 2 241 21 31·8 247 58 7·8 2 54 52·5 2 23 58·2 23·5 19 52·2
Mon. 3 254 30 24·5 260 58 40·8 1 51 31·1 1 17 58·2 24·5 20 45·1
Tues. 4 267 23 16·1 273 44 28·9 N. 0 43 45·9 N. 0 9 21·1 25·5 21 38·2
Wed. 5 280 2 36·3 286 17 54·3 S. 0 24 52·3 S. 0 58 29·4 26·5 22 30·7
Thur. 6 292 30 37·7 298 40 59·1 1 31 8·6 2 2 28·2 27·5 23 21·5
Frid. 7 304 49 9·8 310 55 19·8 2 32 8·4 2 59 50·8 28·5
Sat. 8 316 59 38·6 323 2 14·3 3 25 19·9 3 48 20·3 29·5 0 10·1
Sun. 9 329 3 16·0 335 2 51·7 4 8 40·3 4 26 8·8 0·8 0 56·1
Mon. 10 341 1 12·3 346 58 28·6 4 40 36·8 4 51 58·1 1·8 1 39·8
Tues. 11 352 54 53·9 358 50 43·2 5 0 7·5 5 5 1·2 2·8 2 21·6
Wed. 12 4 46 13·8 10 41 45·5 5 6 37·7 5 4 56·3 3·8 3 2·4
Thur. 13 16 37 41·1 22 34 25·1 4 59 57·8 4 51 44·3 4·8 3 42·9
Frid. 14 28 32 25·9 34 32 13·7 4 40 18·5 4 25 44·5 5·8 4 24·1
Sat. 15 40 34 20·3 46 39 20·4 4 8 7·3 3 47 33·8 6·8 5 6·9
Sun. 16 52 47 49·2 59 0 23·3 3 24 11·1 2 58 8·8 7·8 5 52·2
Mon. 17 65 17 39·7 71 40 13·0 2 29 37·4 1 58 51·3 8·8 6 40·9
Tues. 18 78 8 37·8 84 43 24·3 1 26 6·8 S. 0 51 42·5 9·8 7 33·5
Wed. 19 91 24 59·1 98 13 41·2 S. 0 16 1·9 N. 0 20 28·7 10·8 8 30·0
Thur. 20 105 9 43·5 112 13 6·6 N. 0 57 18·0 1 33 51·0 11·8 9 29·3
Frid. 21 119 23 41·7 126 41 6·4 2 9 29·9 2 43 33·3 12·8 10 30·0
Sat. 22 134 4 44·8 141 33 46·9 3 15 18·4 3 44 3·9 13·8 11 30·0
Sun. 23 149 7 10·9 156 43 43·3 4 9 8·5 4 29 57·3 14·8 12 28·2
Mon. 24 164 22 3·6 172 0 45·3 4 46 1·3 4 56 57·9 15·8 13 24·1
Tues. 25 179 38 22·8 187 13 33·6 5 2 34·9 5 2 50·3 16·8 14 18·0
Wed. 26 194 45 3·6 202 11 48·1 4 57 49·7 4 47 47·3 17·8 15 10·5
Thur. 27 209 32 55·9 216 47 47·6 4 33 5·0 4 14 9·6 18·8 16 2·6
Frid. 28 223 55 59·7 230 57 18·8 3 51 30·7 3 25 41·2 19·8 16 54·9
Sat. 29 237 51 44·5 244 39 26·1 N. 2 57 13·9 N. 2 26 41·5 20·8 17 47·8

[page] 28

MEAN TIME.
THE MOON'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION.
Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10′.
SATURDAY 1.
h m s °
0 15 6 9·29 S. 13 29 47·1 112·86
1 15 8 21·36 13 41 4·3 112·02
2 15 10 33·52 13 52 16·4 111·17
3 15 12 45·76 14 3 23·4 110·32
4 15 14 58·08 14 14 25·3 109·45
5 15 17 10·50 14 25 22·0 108·58
6 15 19 23·01 14 36 13·5 107·70
7 15 21 35·61 14 46 59·7 106·81
8 15 23 48·31 14 57 40·6 105·91
9 15 26 1·10 15 8 16·0 105·00
10 15 28 13·99 15 18 46·1 104·09
11 15 30 26·97 15 29 10·6 103·16
12 15 32 40·05 15 39 29·5 102·23
13 15 34 53·23 15 49 42·9 101·29
14 15 37 6·52 15 59 50·7 100·34
15 15 39 19·90 16 9 52·7 99·39
16 15 41 33·39 16 19 49·1 98·42
17 15 43 46·98 16 29 39·6 97·45
18 15 46 0·67 16 39 24·3 96·47
19 15 48 14·47 16 49 3·1 95·48
20 15 50 28·37 16 58 35·9 94·48
21 15 52 42·38 17 8 2·8 93·48
22 15 54 56·49 17 17 23·7 92·46
23 15 57 10·71 S. 17 26 38·5 91·44

THURSDAY 6.

0 15 59 25·03 S. 17 35 47·1 90·42
1 16 1 39·46 17 44 49·6 89·38
2 16 3 54·00 17 53 45·9 88·34
3 16 6 8·65 18 2 36·0 87·29
4 16 8 23·40 18 11 19·7 86·23
5 16 10 38·25 18 19 57·1 85·17
6 16 12 53·22 18 28 28·1 84·10
7 16 15 8·28 18 36 52·7 83·02
8 16 17 23·45 18 45 10·8 81·94
9 16 19 38·73 18 53 22·4 80·84
10 16 21 54·11 19 1 27·5 79·75
11 16 24 9·59 19 9 26·0 78·64
12 16 26 25·17 19 17 17·8 77·53
13 16 28 40·85 19 25 3·0 76·41
14 16 30 56·64 19 32 41·5 75·29
15 16 33 12·51 19 40 13·2 74·16
16 16 35 28·49 19 47 38·1 73·02
17 16 37 44·57 19 54 56·2 71·88
18 16 40 0·73 20 2 7·5 70·73
19 16 42 17·00 20 9 11·9 69·58
20 16 44 33·35 20 16 9·4 68.42
21 16 46 49·79 20 23 0·0 67·26
22 16 49 6·33 20 29 43·5 66·09
23 16 51 22·95 20 36 20·1 64·92
24 16 53 39·65 S. 20 42 49·6

MONDAY 3.

0 16 53 39·65 S. 20 42 49·6 63·74
1 16 55 56·44 20 49 12·1 62·56
2 16 58 13·31 20 55 27·5 61·37
3 17 0 30·26 21 1 35·7 60·18
4 17 2 47·29 21 7 36·8 58·99
5 17 5 4·40 21 13 30·7 57·78
6 17 7 21·57 21 19 17·4 56·58
7 17 9 38·82 21 24 56·9 55·37
8 17 11 56·14 21 30 29·1 54·16
9 17 14 13·53 21 35 54·1 52·94
10 17 16 30·97 21 41 11·7 51·72
11 17 18 48·49 21 46 22·0 50·49
12 17 21 6·05 21 51 25·0 49·27
13 17 23 23·68 21 56 20·6 48·04
14 17 25 41·36 22 1 8·8 46·80
15 17 27 59·08 22 5 49·6 45·56
16 17 30 16·86 22 10 23·0 44·32
17 17 32 34·68 22 14 48·9 43·08
18 17 34 52·55 22 19 7·3 41·83
19 17 37 10·45 22 23 18·3 40·58
20 17 39 28·38 22 27 21·8 39·32
21 17 41 46·35 22 31 17·7 38·07
22 17 44 4·35 22 35 6·1 36·81
23 17 46 22·38 S. 22 38 47·0 35·55

TUESDAY 4.

0 17 48 40·42 S. 22 42 20·3 34·29
1 17 50 58·49 22 45 46·0 33·02
2 17 53 16·57 22 49 4·2 31·76
3 17 55 34·66 22 52 14·7 30·49
4 17 57 52·76 22 55 17·7 29·22
5 18 0 10·87 22 58 13·0 27·96
6 18 2 28·97 23 1 0·7 26·69
7 18 4 47·08 23 3 40·9 25·42
8 18 7 5·18 23 6 13·4 24·15
9 18 9 23·26 23 8 38·2 22·88
10 18 11 41·34 23 10 55·5 21·60
11 18 13 59·40 23 13 5·1 20·33
12 18 16 17·43 23 15 7·1 19·07
13 18 18 35·44 23 17 1·5 17·79
14 18 20 53·42 23 18 48·3 16·52
15 18 23 11·37 23 20 27·4 15·25
16 18 25 29·29 23 21 58·9 13·98
17 18 27 47·16 23 23 22·8 12·71
18 18 30 4·99 23 24 39·1 11·44
19 18 32 22·77 23 25 47·7 10·17
20 18 34 40·50 23 26 48·8 8·91
21 18 36 58·17 23 27 42·2 7·64
22 18 39 15·78 23 28 28·1 6·37
23 18 41 33·33 23 29 6·3 5·11
24 18 43 50·81 S. 23 29 37·0

[page] 29

WEDNESDAY 5.

0 18 43 50·81 S. 23 29 37·0 3·84
1 18 46 8·22 23 30 0·0 2·58
2 18 48 25·55 23 30 15·5 1·33
3 18 50 42·80 23 30 23·5 0·07
4 18 52 59·96 23 30 23·9 1·18
5 18 55 17·04 23 30 16·8 2·43
6 18 57 34·03 23 30 2·2 3·68
7 18 59 50·92 23 29 40·2 4·93
8 19 2 7·72 23 29 10·6 6·17
9 19 4 24·41 23 28 33·6 7·41
10 19 6 40·99 23 27 49·2 8·64
11 19 8 57·46 23 26 57·3 9·87
12 19 11 13·82 23 25 58·1 11·10
13 19 13 30·06 23 24 51·5 12·32
14 19 15 46·18 23 23 37·5 13·54
15 19 18 2·18 23 22 16·3 14·76
16 19 20 18·05 23 20 47·7 15·97
17 19 22 33·78 23 19 11·8 17·18
18 19 24 49·38 23 17 28·7 18·39
19 19 27 4·83 23 15 38·4 19·59
20 19 29 20·14 23 13 40·9 20·79
21 19 31 35·31 23 11 36·1 21·98
22 19 33 50·33 23 9 24·3 23·16
23 19 36 5·19 S. 23 7 5·3 24·35

THURSDAY 6.

0 19 38 19·89 S. 23 4 39·2 25·53
1 19 40 34·43 23 2 6·1 26·70
2 19 42 48·82 22 59 25·9 27·86
3 19 45 3·03 22 56 38·7 29·03
4 19 47 17·07 22 53 44·5 30·18
5 19 49 30·94 22 50 43·4 31·33
6 19 51 44·64 22 47 35·5 32·48
7 19 53 58·15 22 44 20·6 33·61
8 19 56 11·48 22 40 58·9 34·75
9 19 58 24·63 22 37 30·4 35·87
10 20 0 37·59 22 33 55·2 36·99
11 20 2 50·36 22 30 13·2 38·11
12 20 5 2·94 22 26 24·6 39·22
13 20 7 15·32 22 22 29·3 40·32
14 20 9 27·51 22 18 27·4 41·41
15 20 11 39·49 22 14 18·9 42·50
16 20 13 51·27 22 10 3·9 43·58
17 20 16 2·85 22 5 42·4 44·66
18 20 18 14·22 22 1 14·5 45·73
19 20 20 25·38 21 56 40·1 46·79
20 20 22 36·33 21 51 59·4 47·84
21 20 24 47·06 21 47 12·3 48·89
22 20 26 57·58 21 42 19·0 49·93
23 20 29 7·88 21 37 19·4 50·96
24 20 31 17·96 S. 21 32 13·7

FRIDAY 7.

0 20 31 17·96 S. 21 32 13·7 51·99
1 20 33 27·82 21 27 1·7 53·01
2 20 35 37·46 21 21 43·6 54·02
3 20 37 46·87 21 16 19·5 55·02
4 20 39 56·05 21 10 49·4 56·02
5 20 42 5·01 21 5 13·3 57·01
6 20 44 13·74 20 59 31·2 57·99
7 20 46 22·23 20 53 43·3 58·96
8 20 48 30·50 20 47 49·6 59·92
9 20 50 38·53 20 41 50·0 60·88
10 20 52 46·33 20 35 44·8 61·83
11 20 54 53·90 20 29 33·8 62·77
12 20 57 1·23 20 23 17·2 63·70
13 20 59 8·32 20 16 55·0 64·62
14 21 1 15·18 20 10 27·3 65·54
15 21 3 21·80 20 3 54·0 66·45
16 21 5 28·18 19 57 15·4 67·35
17 21 7 34·32 19 50 31·3 68·24
18 21 9 40·22 19 43 41·8 69·12
19 21 11 45·88 19 36 47·1 70·00
20 21 13 51·29 19 29 47·1 70·87
21 21 15 56·47 19 22 41·9 71·73
22 21 18 1·41 19 15 31·5 72·58
23 21 20 6·10 S. 19 8 16·0 73·42

SATURDAY 8.

0 21 22 10·55 S. 19 0 55·5 74·26
1 21 24 14·76 18 53 29·9 75·09
2 21 26 18·72 18 45 59·4 75·91
3 21 28 22·44 18 38 24·0 76·72
4 21 30 25·92 18 30 43·7 77·52
5 21 32 29·16 18 22 58·6 78·31
6 21 34 32·16 18 15 8·7 79·10
7 21 36 34·91 18 7 14·1 79·87
8 21 38 37·43 17 59 14·9 80·64
9 21 40 39·70 17 51 11·1 81·40
10 21 42 41·73 17 43 2·7 82·15
11 21 44 43·53 17 34 49·8 82·89
12 21 46 45·09 17 26 32·4 83·62
13 21 48 46·41 17 18 10·7 84·35
14 21 50 47·50 17 9 44·6 85·06
15 21 52 48·35 17 1 14·2 85·77
16 21 54 48·96 16 52 39·6 86·47
17 21 56 49·34 16 44 0·7 87·17
18 21 58 49·48 16 35 17·7 87·85
19 22 0 49·39 16 26 30·6 88·52
20 22 2 49·07 16 17 39·5 89·19
21 22 4 48·53 16 8 44·4 89·85
22 22 6 47·75 15 59 45·3 90·50
23 22 8 46·75 15 50 42·3 91·14
24 22 10 45·52 S. 15 41 35·5

[page] 30

SUNDAY 9.

0 22 10 45·52 S. 15 41 35·5 91·77
1 22 12 44·06 15 32 24·9 92·40
2 22 14 42·38 15 23 10·5 93·01
3 22 16 40·48 15 13 52·4 93·62
4 22 18 38·35 15 4 30·7 94·22
5 22 20 36·01 14 55 5·3 94·81
6 22 22 33·45 14 45 36·5 95·40
7 22 24 30·67 14 36 4·1 95·98
8 22 26 27·68 14 26 28·2 96·54
9 22 28 24·48 14 16 49·0 97·10
10 22 30 21·07 14 7 6·3 97·66
11 22 32 17·45 13 57 20·4 98·20
12 22 34 13·62 13 47 31·2 98·74
13 22 36 9·59 13 37 38·8 99·27
14 22 38 5·36 13 27 43·2 99·79
15 22 40 0·92 13 17 44·5 100·30
16 22 41 56·29 13 7 42·7 100·80
17 22 43 51·47 12 57 37·9 101·30
18 22 45 46·44 12 47 30·1 101·78
19 22 47 41·23 12 37 19·4 102·26
20 22 49 35·82 12 27 5·8 102·74
21 22 51 30·23 12 16 49·4 103·20
22 22 53 24·45 12 6 30·2 103·66
23 22 55 18·49 S. 11 56 8·2 104·11

MONDAY 10.

0 22 57 12·34 S. 11 45 43·6 104·55
1 22 59 6·02 11 35 16·3 104·97
2 23 0 59·52 11 24 46·5 105·40
3 23 2 52·85 11 14 14·1 105·82
4 23 4 46·00 11 3 39·1 106·23
5 23 6 38·99 10 53 1·7 106·64
6 23 8 31·81 10 42 21·9 107·03
7 23 10 24·47 10 31 39·7 107·42
8 23 12 16·97 10 20 55·2 107·80
9 23 14 9·31 10 10 8·4 108·17
10 23 16 1·49 9 59 19·4 108·54
11 23 17 53·52 9 48 28·2 108·90
12 23 19 45·40 9 37 34·8 109·25
13 23 21 37·13 9 26 39·3 109·59
14 23 23 28·72 9 15 41·8 109·93
15 23 25 20·17 9 4 42·2 110·26
16 23 27 11·48 8 53 40·7 110·58
17 23 29 2·65 8 42 37·2 110·90
18 23 30 53·69 8 31 31·8 111·20
19 23 32 44·59 8 20 24·6 111·51
20 23 34 35·37 8 9 15·5 111·80
21 23 36 26·02 7 58 4·7 112·09
22 23 38 16·55 7 46 52·2 112·37
23 23 40 6·96 7 35 38·0 112·64
24 23 41 57·26 S. 7 24 22·2

TUESDAY 11.

0 23 41 57·26 S. 7 24 22·2 112·91
1 23 43 47·44 7 13 4·7 113·17
2 23 45 37·51 7 1 45·7 113·42
3 23 47 27·48 6 50 25·2 113·67
4 23 49 17·33 6 39 3·2 113·90
5 23 51 7·09 6 27 39·8 114·14
6 23 52 56·75 6 16 15·0 114·36
7 23 54 46·32 6 4 48·8 114·58
8 23 56 35·79 5 53 21·3 114·79
9 23 58 25·18 5 41 52·6 115·00
10 0 0 14·48 5 30 22·6 115·19
11 0 2 3·70 5 18 51·4 115·39
12 0 3 52·84 5 7 19·1 115·57
13 0 5 41·91 4 55 45·7 115·75
14 0 7 30·90 4 44 11·2 115·92
15 0 9 19·82 4 32 35·7 116·08
16 0 11 8·68 4 20 59·2 116·24
17 0 12 57·48 4 9 21·8 116·40
18 0 14 46·21 3 57 43·4 116·54
19 0 16 34·89 3 46 4·1 116·68
20 0 18 23·52 3 34 24·1 116·81
21 0 20 12·10 3 22 43·2 116·94
22 0 22 0·63 3 11 1·6 117·06
23 0 23 49·12 S. 2 59 19·2 117·17

WEDNESDAY 12.

0 0 25 37·57 S. 2 47 36·2 117·28
1 0 27 25·98 2 35 52·5 117·38
2 0 29 14·36 2 24 8·3 117·47
3 0 31 2·71 2 12 23·4 117·56
4 0 32 51·04 2 0 38·1 117·64
5 0 34 39·34 1 48 52·2 117·72
6 0 36 27·62 1 37 5·9 117·79
7 0 38 15·89 1 25 19·2 117·85
8 0 40 4·14 1 13 32·1 117·91
9 0 41 52·39 1 1 44·7 117·96
10 0 43 40·63 0 49 56·9 118·00
11 0 45 28·87 0 38 9·0 118·04
12 0 47 17·11 0 26 20·7 118·07
13 0 49 5·36 0 14 32·3 118·09
14 0 50 53·61 S. 0 2 43·8 118·11
15 0 52 41·88 N. 0 9 4·9 118·12
16 0 54 30·17 0 20 53·7 118·13
17 0 56 18·47 0 32 42·5 118·13
18 0 58 6·80 0 44 31·2 118·12
19 0 59 55·15 0 56 20·0 118·11
20 1 1 43·54 1 8 8·6 118·09
21 1 3 31·96 1 19 57·2 118·07
22 1 5 20·41 1 31 45·6 118·03
23 1 7 8·91 1 43 33·8 118·00
24 1 8 57·45 N. 1 55 21·8

[page] 31

THURSDAY 13.

0 1 8 57·5 N. 1 55 21·8 117·95
1 1 10 46·04 2 7 9·5 117·90
2 1 12 34·68 2 18 56·8 117·84
3 1 14 23·37 2 30 43·9 117·78
4 1 16 12·13 2 42 30·6 117·71
5 1 18 0·95 2 54 16·8 117·63
6 1 19 49·83 3 6 2·6 117·55
7 1 21 38·79 3 17 47·9 117·46
8 1 23 27·81 3 29 32·7 117·37
9 1 25 16·92 3 41 16·9 117·27
10 1 27 6·11 3 53 0·5 117·16
11 1 28 55·38 4 4 43·4 117·04
12 1 30 44·74 4 16 25·7 116·93
13 1 32 34·19 4 28 7·3 116·80
14 1 34 23·74 4 39 48·1 116·67
15 1 36 13·39 4 51 28·1 116·53
16 1 38 3·15 5 3 7·2 116·38
17 1 39 53·01 5 14 45·5 116·23
18 1 41 42·98 5 26 22·9 116·07
19 1 43 33·07 5 37 59·3 115·90
20 1 45 23·27 5 49 34·7 115·73
21 1 47 13·60 6 1 9·1 115·55
22 1 49 4·05 6 12 42·4 115·37
23 1 50 54·63 N. 6 24 14·6 115·17

FRIDAY 14.

0 1 52 45·34 N. 6 35 45·6 114·97
1 1 54 36·19 6 47 15·5 114·77
2 1 56 27·19 6 58 44·1 114·55
3 1 58 18·32 7 10 11·4 114·33
4 2 0 9·61 7 21 37·4 114·11
5 2 2 1·05 7 33 2·0 113·87
6 2 3 52·64 7 44 25·3 113·63
7 2 5 44·39 7 55 47·1 113·38
8 2 7 36·31 8 7 7·4 113·13
9 2 9 28·39 8 18 26·1 112·87
10 2 11 20·64 8 29 43·4 112·60
11 2 13 13·06 8 40 58·9 112·32
12 2 15 5·67 8 52 12·9 112·04
13 2 16 58·46 9 3 25·1 111·75
14 2 18 51·43 9 14 35·6 111·45
15 2 20 44·58 9 25 44·3 111·14
16 2 22 37·93 9 36 51·1 110·83
17 2 24 31·48 9 47 56·1 110·51
18 2 26 25·23 9 58 59·2 110·18
19 2 28 19·18 10 10 0·3 109·85
20 2 30 13·34 10 20 59·3 109·50
21 2 32 7·71 10 31 56·3 109·15
22 2 34 2·30 10 42 51·2 108·79
23 2 35 57·10 10 53 44·0 108·42
24 2 37 52·13 N. 11 4 34·5

SATURDAY 15.

0 2 37 52·13 N. 11 4 34·5 108·05
1 2 39 47·38 11 15 22·8 107·67
2 2 41 42·87 11 26 8·8 107·28
3 2 43 38·58 11 36 52·5 106·88
4 2 45 34·53 11 47 33·7 106·47
5 2 47 30·73 11 58 12·6 106·06
6 2 49 27·16 12 8 48·9 105·63
7 2 51 23·85 12 19 22·7 105·20
8 2 53 20·78 12 29 53·9 104·76
9 2 55 17·97 12 40 22·5 104·31
10 2 57 15·42 12 50 48·4 103·86
11 2 59 13·12 13 1 11·5 103·39
12 3 1 11·09 13 11 31·9 102·92
13 3 3 9·33 13 21 49·4 102·44
14 3 5 7·84 13 32 4·0 101·94
15 3 7 6·62 13 42 15·7 101·44
16 3 9 5·68 13 52 24·3 100·94
17 3 11 5·03 14 2 30·0 100·42
18 3 13 4·65 14 12 32·5 99·89
19 3 15 4·56 14 22 31·8 99·35
20 3 17 4·77 14 32 27·9 98·81
21 3 19 5·27 14 42 20·8 98·25
22 3 21 6·06 14 52 10·3 97·69
23 3 23 7·16 N. 15 1 56·4 97·12

SUNDAY 16.

0 3 25 8·56 N. 15 11 39·1 96·53
1 3 27 10·27 15 21 18·3 95·94
2 3 29 12·28 15 30 53·9 95·34
3 3 31 14·61 15 40 25·9 94·72
4 3 33 17·25 15 49 54·3 94·10
5 3 35 20·22 15 59 18·9 93·47
6 3 37 23·50 16 8 39·7 92·83
7 3 39 27·10 16 17 56·7 92·18
8 3 41 31·04 16 27 9·8 91·52
9 3 43 35·30 16 36 18·9 90·84
10 3 45 39·89 16 45 23·9 90·16
11 3 47 44·82 16 54 24·9 89·47
12 3 49 50·08 17 3 21·7 88·77
13 3 51 55·68 17 12 14·4 88·06
14 3 54 1·63 17 21 2·7 87·34
15 3 56 7·92 17 29 46·8 86·60
16 3 58 14·56 17 38 26·4 85·86
17 4 0 21·54 17 47 1·5 85·10
18 4 2 28·88 17 55 32·2 84·34
19 4 4 36·57 18 3 58·2 83·56
20 4 6 44·61 18 12 19·5 82·77
21 4 8 53·01 18 20 36·2 81·97
22 4 11 1·77 18 28 48·0 81·16
23 4 13 10·88 18 36 54·9 80·34
24 4 15 20·36 N. 18 44 57·0

[page] 32

MONDAY 17.

0 4 15 20·36 N. 18 44 57·0 79·50
1 4 17 30·20 18 52 54·0 78·66
2 4 19 40·40 19 0 45·9 77·80
3 4 21 50·98 19 8 32·7 76·93
4 4 24 1·92 19 16 14·3 76·05
5 4 26 13·22 19 23 50·7 75·16
6 4 28 24·90 19 31 21·7 74·26
7 4 30 36·95 19 38 47·2 73·35
8 4 32 49·37 19 46 7·3 72·43
9 4 35 2·17 19 53 21·9 71·49
10 4 37 15·33 20 0 30·8 70·54
11 4 39 28·88 20 7 34·1 69·58
12 4 41 42·79 20 14 31·5 68·61
13 4 43 57·09 20 21 23·2 67·63
14 4 46 11·76 20 28 9·0 66·63
15 4 48 26·81 20 34 48·7 65·62
16 4 50 42·24 20 41 22·5 64·61
17 4 52 58·04 20 47 50·1 63·58
18 4 55 14·22 20 54 11·6 62·53
19 4 57 30·78 21 0 26·8 61·48
20 4 59 47·71 21 6 35·7 60·41
21 5 2 5·02 21 12 38·1 59·34
22 5 4 22·71 21 18 34·2 58·25
23 5 6 40·77 N. 21 24 23·7 57·15

TUESDAY 18.

0 5 8 59·20 N. 21 30 6·5 56·04
1 5 11 18·01 21 35 42·7 54·91
2 5 13 37·19 21 41 12·2 53·77
3 5 15 56·74 21 46 34·9 52·62
4 5 18 16·66 21 51 50·6 51·46
5 5 20 36·95 21 56 59·4 50·29
6 5 22 57·61 22 2 1·1 49·11
7 5 25 18·63 22 6 55·8 47·91
8 5 27 40·02 22 11 43·2 46·70
9 5 30 1·77 22 16 23·4 45·48
10 5 32 23·88 22 20 56·3 44·25
11 5 34 46·34 22 25 21·8 43·01
12 5 37 9·16 22 29 39·9 41·75
13 5 39 32·34 22 33 50·4 40·49
14 5 41 55·87 22 37 53·3 39·21
15 5 44 19·75 22 41 48·5 37·92
16 5 46 43·97 22 45 36·0 36·62
17 5 49 8·54 22 49 15·7 35·31
18 5 51 33·45 22 52 47·6 33·99
19 5 53 58·69 22 56 11·5 32·65
20 5 56 24·26 22 59 27·4 31·31
21 5 58 50·16 23 2 35·3 29·96
22 6 1 16·39 23 5 35·0 28·59
23 6 3 42·94 23 8 26·6 27·22
24 6 6 9·81 N. 23 11 9·9

WEDNESDAY 19.

0 6 6 9·81 N. 23 11 9·9 25·84
1 6 8 36·99 23 13 44·9 24·44
2 6 11 4·49 23 16 11·6 23·04
3 6 13 32·28 23 18 29·8 21·62
4 6 16 0·38 23 20 39·5 20·20
5 6 18 28·78 23 22 40·7 18·76
6 6 20 57·47 23 24 33·3 17·32
7 6 23 26·45 23 26 17·2 15·86
8 6 25 55·71 23 27 52·3 14·40
9 6 28 25·25 23 29 18·8 12·93
10 6 30 55·06 23 30 36·4 11·45
11 6 33 25·13 23 31 45·1 9·96
12 6 35 55·47 23 32 44·9 8·47
13 6 38 26·07 23 33 35·7 6·96
14 6 40 56·93 23 34 17·4 5·45
15 6 43 28·02 23 34 50·1 3·93
16 6 45 59·36 23 35 13·7 2·40
17 6 48 30·93 23 35 28·1 0·87
18 6 51 2·73 23 35 33·3 0·68
19 6 53 34·75 23 35 29·2 2·22
20 6 56 6·99 23 35 15·9 3·78
21 6 58 39·43 23 34 53·2 5·34
22 7 1 12·08 23 34 21·2 6·90
23 7 3 44·93 N. 23 33 39·8 8·48

THURSDAY 20.

0 7 6 17·96 N. 23 32 48·9 10·06
1 7 8 51·18 23 31 48·6 11·64
2 7 11 24·57 23 30 38·7 13·23
3 7 13 58·13 23 29 19·4 14·82
4 7 16 31·86 23 27 50·5 15·41
5 7 19 5·74 23 26 12·0 18·01
6 7 21 39·77 23 24 23·9 19·62
7 7 24 13·94 23 22 26·2 21·22
8 7 26 48·25 23 20 18·9 22·83
9 7 29 22·69 23 18 1·9 24·44
10 7 31 57·25 23 15 35·2 26·06
11 7 34 31·92 23 12 58·9 27·67
12 7 37 6·70 23 10 12·8 29·29
13 7 39 41·59 23 7 17·1 30·91
14 7 42 16·57 23 4 11·6 32·53
15 7 44 51·63 23 0 56·4 34·15
16 7 47 26·77 22 57 31·5 35·78
17 7 50 1·99 22 53 56·8 37·40
18 7 52 37·27 22 50 12·4 39·02
19 7 55 12·60 22 46 18·3 40·64
20 7 57 47·99 22 42 14·4 42·26
21 8 0 23·42 22 38 0·9 43·88
22 8 2 58·89 22 33 37·6 45·50
23 8 5 34·39 22 29 4·6 47·11
24 8 8 9·91 N. 22 24 21·9

[page] 33

FRIDAY 21.

0 8 8 9·91 N. 22 24 21·9 48·73
1 8 10 45·45 22 19 29·5 50·34
2 8 13 20·99 22 14 27·5 51·95
3 8 15 56·54 22 9 15·8 53·55
4 8 18 32·08 22 3 54·5 55·15
5 8 21 7·61 21 58 23·6 56·75
6 8 23 43·12 21 52 43·1 58·34
7 8 26 18·60 21 46 53·1 59·93
8 8 28 54·05 21 40 53·5 61·51
9 8 31 29·46 21 34 44·5 63·08
10 8 34 4·83 21 28 26·0 64·65
11 8 36 40·15 21 21 58·1 66·22
12 8 39 15·40 21 15 20·7 67·78
13 8 41 50·59 21 8 34·1 69·33
14 8 44 25·72 21 1 38·1 70·87
15 8 47 0·76 20 54 32·8 72·41
16 8 49 35·72 20 47 18·4 73·94
17 8 52 10·60 20 39 54·8 75·46
18 8 54 45·38 20 32 22·0 76·97
19 8 57 20·06 20 24 40·2 78·47
20 8 59 54·64 20 16 49·4 79·96
21 9 2 29·11 20 8 49·6 81·45
22 9 5 3·46 20 0 41·0 82·92
23 9 7 37·69 N. 19 52 23·5 84·38

SATURDAY 22.

0 9 10 11·79 N. 19 43 57·2 85·83
1 9 12 45·76 19 35 22·1 87·28
2 9 15 19·59 19 26 38·5 88·71
3 9 17 53·29 19 17 46·2 90·13
4 9 20 26·84 19 8 45·5 91·54
5 9 23 0·23 18 59 36·3 92·93
6 9 25 33·48 18 50 18·7 94·32
7 9 28 6·57 18 40 52·8 95·69
8 9 30 39·49 18 31 18·6 97·05
9 9 33 12·25 18 21 36·3 98·40
10 9 35 44·84 18 11 45·9 99·73
11 9 38 17·26 18 1 47·5 101·05
12 9 40 49·49 17 51 41·2 102·36
13 9 43 21·54 17 41 27·1 103·66
14 9 45 53·42 17 31 5·1 104·93
15 9 48 25·10 17 20 35·5 106·20
16 9 50 56·59 17 9 58·3 107·45
17 9 53 27·90 16 59 13·7 108·68
18 9 55 59·00 16 48 21·6 109·90
19 9 58 29·91 16 37 22·2 111·10
20 10 1 0·62 16 26 15·6 112·29
21 10 3 31·12 16 15 1·9 113·46
22 10 6 1·42 16 3 41·1 114·62
23 10 8 31·51 15 52 13·4 115·75
24 10 11 1·39 N. 15 40 38·9

SUNDAY 23.

0 10 11 1·39 N. 15 40 38·9 116·88
1 10 13 31·06 15 28 57·6 117·98
2 10 16 0·52 15 17 9·7 119·07
3 10 18 29·76 15 5 15·3 120·14
4 10 20 58·79 14 53 14·5 121·20
5 10 23 27·60 14 41 7·3 122·23
6 10 25 56·20 14 28 53·9 123·25
7 10 28 24·58 14 16 34·4 124·26
8 10 30 52·74 14 4 8·8 125·24
9 10 33 20·68 13 51 37·4 126·21
10 10 35 48·40 13 39 0·1 127·16
11 10 38 15·90 13 26 17·1 128·09
12 10 40 43·17 13 13 28·6 129·02
13 10 43 10·23 13 0 34·6 129·90
14 10 45 37·06 12 47 35·2 130·78
15 10 48 3·68 12 34 30·5 131·63
16 10 50 30·07 12 21 20·7 132·47
17 10 52 56·24 12 8 5·9 133·29
18 10 55 22·19 11 54 46·1 134·10
19 10 57 47·93 11 41 21·5 134·88
20 11 0 13·44 11 27 52·3 135·65
21 11 2 38·73 11 14 18·4 136·39
22 11 5 3·81 11 0 40·0 137·12
23 11 7 28·66 N. 10 46 57·3 137·83

MONDAY 24.

0 11 9 53·30 N. 10 33 10·3 138·52
1 11 12 17·72 10 19 19·2 139·19
2 11 14 41·93 10 5 24·1 139·84
3 11 17 5·92 9 51 25·0 140·47
4 11 19 29·70 9 37 22·2 141·09
5 11 21 53·28 9 23 15·7 141·68
6 11 24 16·64 9 9 5·6 142·25
7 11 26 39·80 8 54 52·1 142·81
8 11 29 2·75 8 40 35·2 143·34
9 11 31 25·49 8 26 15·2 143·86
10 11 33 48·04 8 11 52·0 144·36
11 11 36 10·38 7 57 25·8 144·84
12 11 38 32·53 7 42 56·8 145·30
13 11 40 54·48 7 28 25·0 145·74
14 11 43 16·24 7 13 50·6 146·16
15 11 45 37·80 6 59 13·7 146·56
16 11 47 59·18 6 44 34·3 146·94
17 11 50 20·37 6 29 52·7 147·30
18 11 52 41·38 6 15 8·9 147·64
19 11 55 2·20 6 0 23·0 147·97
20 11 57 22·84 5 45 35·2 148·27
21 11 59 43·31 5 30 45·6 148·56
22 12 2 3·60 5 15 54·2 148·83
23 12 4 23·72 5 1 1·3 149·07
24 12 6 43·67 N. 4 46 6·8

D

[page] 34

TUESDAY 25.

0 12 6 43·67 N. 4 46 6·8 149·30
1 12 9 3·45 4 31 11·0 149·51
2 12 11 23·08 4 16 14·0 149·70
3 12 13 42·54 4 1 15·8 149·87
4 12 16 1·84 3 46 16·6 150·03
5 12 18 20·99 3 31 16·4 150·16
6 12 20 39·98 3 16 15·4 150·28
7 12 22 58·83 3 1 13·7 150·38
8 12 25 17·53 2 46 11·5 150·46
9 12 27 36·09 2 31 8·7 150·53
10 12 29 54·51 2 16 5·5 150·57
11 12 32 12·80 2 1 2·1 150·60
12 12 34 30·95 1 45 58·5 150·61
13 12 36 48·97 1 30 54·9 150·60
14 12 39 6·86 1 15 51·3 150·57
15 12 41 24·64 1 0 47·8 150·53
16 12 43 42·29 0 45 44·6 150·47
17 12 45 59·82 0 30 41·8 150·39
18 12 48 17·23 0 15 39·5 150·30
19 12 50 34·54 N. 0 0 37·7 150·18
20 12 52 51·74 S. 0 14 23·4 150·05
21 12 55 8·83 0 29 23·7 149·91
22 12 57 25·83 0 44 23·2 149·74
23 12 59 42·72 S. 0 59 21·6 149·66

WEDNESDAY 26.

0 13 1 59·52 S. 1 14 19·0 149·36
1 13 4 16·23 1 29 15·2 149·15
2 13 6 32·84 1 44 10·1 148·92
3 13 8 49·38 1 59 3·6 148·67
4 13 11 5·83 2 13 55·6 148·41
5 13 13 22·20 2 28 46·0 148·13
6 13 15 38·49 2 43 34·8 147·83
7 13 17 54·72 2 58 21·8 147·52
8 13 20 10·87 3 13 7·0 147·20
9 13 22 26·97 3 27 50·1 146·85
10 13 24 42·99 3 42 31·3 146·50
11 13 26 58·96 3 57 10·2 146·12
12 13 29 14·88 4 11 47·0 145·73
13 13 31 30·75 4 26 21·4 145·33
14 13 33 46·56 4 40 53·3 144·91
15 13 36 2·33 4 55 22·8 144·48
16 13 38 18·06 5 9 49·6 144·03
17 13 40 33·74 5 24 13·8 143·56
18 13 42 49·39 5 38 35·2 143·08
19 13 45 5·00 5 52 53·7 142·59
20 13 47 20·59 6 7 9·2 142·08
21 13 49 36·14 6 21 21·7 141·56
22 13 51 51·67 6 35 31·1 141·03
23 13 54 7·18 6 49 37·2 140·48
24 13 56 22·66 S. 7 3 40·1

THURSDAY 27.

0 13 56 22·66 S. 7 3 40·1 139·91
1 13 58 38·13 7 17 39·5 139·33
2 14 0 53·58 7 31 35·5 138·74
3 14 3 9·03 7 45 28·0 138·14
4 14 5 24·46 7 59 16·8 137·52
5 14 7 39·89 8 13 1·9 136·89
6 14 9 55·32 8 26 43·3 136·25
7 14 12 10·74 8 40 20·8 135·60
8 14 14 26·17 8 53 54·4 134·93
9 14 16 41·61 9 7 24·0 134·25
10 14 18 57·05 9 20 49·5 133·56
11 14 21 12·50 9 34 10·8 132·85
12 14 23 27·97 9 47 27·9 132·14
13 14 25 43·45 10 0 40·7 131·41
14 14 27 58·95 10 13 49·2 130·66
15 14 30 14·48 10 26 53·1 129·91
16 14 32 30·02 10 39 52·6 129·15
17 14 34 45·59 10 52 47·5 128·37
18 14 37 1·19 11 5 37·7 127·58
19 14 39 16·81 11 18 23·2 126·78
20 14 41 32·46 11 31 3·9 125·97
21 14 43 48·15 11 43 39·7 125·15
22 14 46 3·87 11 56 10·5 124·31
23 14 48 19·63 S. 12 8 36·4 123·47

FRIDAY 28.

0 14 50 35·42 S. 12 20 57·2 122·61
1 14 52 51·25 12 33 12·9 121·74
2 14 55 7·13 12 45 23·3 120·87
3 14 57 23·04 12 57 28·5 119·98
4 14 59 39·00 13 9 28·4 119·08
5 15 1 55·01 13 21 22·9 118·17
6 15 4 11·06 13 33 11·9 117·26
7 15 6 27·17 13 44 55·5 116·33
8 15 8 43·32 13 56 33·5 115·39
9 15 10 59·52 14 8 5·8 114·45
10 15 13 15·78 14 19 32·5 113·49
11 15 15 32·09 14 30 53·5 112·53
12 15 17 48·46 14 42 8·6 111·55
13 15 20 4·88 14 53 17·9 110·57
14 15 22 21·37 15 4 21·3 109·58
15 15 24 37·90 15 15 18·8 108·57
16 15 26 54·50 15 26 10·2 107·57
17 15 29 11·16 15 36 55·6 106·55
18 15 31 27·87 15 47 34·9 105·52
19 15 33 44·65 15 58 8·0 104·48
20 15 36 1·49 16 8 34·9 103·44
21 15 38 18·39 16 18 55·6 102·39
22 15 40 35·36 16 29 9·9 101·33
23 15 42 52·38 16 39 17·9 100·26
24 15 45 9·47 S. 16 49 19·5

[page] 35

MEAN TIME.

PHASES OF THE MOON.

d h m
New Moon 8 5 1·1
First Quarter 16 9 41·1
Full Moon 23 8 59·8
d h
Apogee 11 11
Perigee 24 1

D 2

[page] 36

MEAN TIME.
LUNAR DISTANCES.
Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Noon. P.L. of. diff. IIIh. P.L. of diff. VIh P.L. of diff. IXh. P.L. of diff
° ° ° °
1 Regulus W. 80 22 17 2477 82 4 2 2490 83 45 29 2502 85 26 40 2514
Saturn W. 37 14 4 2474 38 55 54 2485 40 37 29 2497 42 18 47 2507
Spica n W. 27 0 47 2621 28 39 13 2619 30 17 42 2619 31 56 11 2621
Mars E. 57 47 31 2717 56 11 13 2729 54 35 12 2742 52 59 28 2755
SUN E. 84 19 42 2811 82 45 29 2825 81 11 34 2838 79 37 55 2852
2 Regulus W. 93 48 23 2573 95 27 55 2585 97 7 11 2596 98 46 11 2607
Saturn W. 50 41 22 2564 52 21 6 2575 54 0 35 2585 55 39 50 2597
Spica n W. 40 7 44 2642 41 45 42 2648 43 23 32 2655 45 1 12 2662
Mars E. 45 5 1 2818 43 30 57 2830 41 57 8 2842 40 23 35 2854
SUN E. 71 53 58 2916 70 22 0 2929 68 50 18 2942 67 18 52 2954
3 Saturn W. 63 52 22 2649 65 30 11 2660 67 7 45 2669 68 45 6 2679
Spica n W. 53 6 58 2703 54 43 34 2711 56 20 0 2720 57 56 14 2728
Mars E. 32 39 36 2912 31 7 32 2923 29 35 42 2934 28 4 6 2944
SUN E. 59 45 31 3014 58 15 36 3026 56 45 55 3037 55 16 28 3048
4 Saturn W. 76 48 39 2726 78 24 44 2735 80 0 38 2744 81 36 19 2753
Spica n W. 65 54 39 2769 67 29 47 2778 69 4 44 2785 70 39 31 2794
Antares W. 20 37 2 2985 22 7 33 2962 23 38 33 2945 25 9 55 2931
Mars E. 20 29 23 2995 18 59 4 3006 - - - - - - - - - -
SUN E. 47 52 40 3104 46 24 35 3115 44 56 43 3125 43 29 4 3135
5 Saturn W. 89 31 57 2795 91 6 32 2803 92 40 56 2811 94 15 10 2819
Spica n W. 78 30 44 2835 80 4 27 2842 81 38 0 2849 83 11 24 2858
Antares W. 32 49 37 2907 34 21 47 2907 35 53 57 2908 37 26 6 2909
SUN E. 36 14 0 3189 34 47 38 3200 33 21 29 3210 31 55 32 3222
6 Saturn W. 102 3 48 2857 103 37 2 2864 105 10 7 2871 106 43 3 2878
Antares W. 45 6 5 2926 46 37 51 2930 48 9 32 2934 49 41 8 2939
9 Jupiter E.
10 SUN W.
Jupiter E. 48 54 0 3123 47 26 18 3127 45 58 41 3131 44 31 9 3136
α Arietis E. 56 2 53 3258 54 37 52 3270 53 13 5 3282 51 48 32 3294
Aldebaran E. 86 1 42 3057 84 32 40 3061 83 3 42 3065 81 34 49 3069
11 SUN W. 30 56 6 3495 32 16 36 3495 33 37 6 3495 34 57 36 3495
Jupiter E. 37 14 48 3156 35 47 46 3160 34 20 49 3163 32 53 56 3167
α Arietis E. 44 49 42 3369 43 26 50 3387 42 4 19 3408 40 42 11 3429
Aldebaran E. 74 11 22 3082 72 42 50 3084 71 14 21 3086 69 45 54 3087
Pollux E. 118 20 53 3097 116 52 40 3100 115 24 30 3101 113 56 21 3101
12 SUN W. 41 40 12 3491 43 0 46 3490 44 21 21 3489 45 41 58 3487
Jupiter E. 25 40 43 3188 24 14 20 3194 22 48 3 3200 21 21 54 3207
Aldebaran E. 62 24 0 3092 60 55 40 3091 59 27 19 3090 57 58 57 3090
Pollux E. 106 35 46 3102 105 7 39 3101 103 39 31 3100 102 11 22 3099
13 SUN W. 52 25 42 3472 53 46 37 3468 55 7 37 3464 56 28 41 3460
Aldebaran E. 50 36 49 3082 49 8 17 3078 47 39 41 3075 46 11 1 3073
Pollux E. 94 50 6 3088 93 21 42 3085 91 53 14 3082 90 24 42 3077
14 SUN W. 63 15 32 3430 64 37 15 3422 65 59 7 3415 67 21 7 3406
Aldebaran E. 38 46 33 3051 37 17 23 3045 35 48 6 3039 34 18 42 3034
Pollux E. 83 0 35 3052 81 31 26 3045 80 2 9 3039 78 32 44 3031

[page] 37

Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Midnight. P.L. of. diff. XVh. P.L. of diff. XVIIIh. P.L. of diff. XXIh. P.L. of diff
° ° ° °
1 Regulus W. 87 7 34 2526 88 48 11 2538 90 28 31 2550 92 8 35 2561
Saturn W. 43 59 50 2520 45 40 36 2530 47 21 7 2542 49 1 22 2553
Spica n W. 33 34 37 2621 35 13 3 2626 36 51 23 2630 38 29 37 2635
Mars E. 51 24 1 2769 49 48 52 2780 48 13 58 2794 46 39 22 2805
SUN E. 78 4 34 2865 76 31 30 2878 74 58 43 2891 73 26 12 2904
2 Regulus W. 100 24 56 2618 102 3 26 2630 103 41 40 2641 105 19 40 2651
Saturn W. 57 18 49 2607 58 57 34 2618 60 36 4 2629 62 14 20 2639
Spica n W. 46 38 43 2671 48 16 2 2678 49 53 12 2687 51 30 10 2694
Mars E. 38 50 17 2866 37 17 15 2877 35 44 27 2889 34 11 54 2901
SUN E. 65 47 41 2966 64 16 46 2978 62 46 6 2990 61 15 41 3002
3 Saturn W. 70 22 14 2689 71 59 9 2698 73 35 52 2708 75 12 21 2717
Spica n W. 59 32 17 2736 61 8 9 2744 62 43 50 2753 64 19 20 2761
Mars E. 26 32 43 2954 25 1 33 2965 23 30 37 2975 21 59 53 2986
SUN E. 53 47 15 3061 52 18 16 3071 50 49 31 3082 49 20 59 3092
4 Saturn W. 83 11 49 2761 84 47 8 2770 86 22 15 2779 87 57 11 2786
Spica n W. 72 14 6 2802 73 48 31 2810 75 22 46 2818 76 56 50 2826
Antares W. 26 41 34 2921 28 13 26 2915 29 45 26 2912 31 17 30 2909
Mars E.
SUN E. 42 1 37 3147 40 34 24 3157 39 7 23 3168 37 40 35 3178
5 Saturn W. 95 49 13 2826 97 23 7 2835 98 56 50 2842 100 30 24 2849
Spica n W. 84 44 37 2865 86 17 41 2873 87 50 34 2880 89 23 18 2887
Antares W. 38 58 13 2912 40 30 17 2915 42 2 17 2918 43 34 13 2921
SUN E. 30 29 49 3233 29 4 19 3246 27 39 4 3257 26 14 2 3270
6 Saturn W. 108 15 50 2886 109 48 27 2893 111 20 55 2899 112 53 15 2906
Antares W. 51 12 37 2943 52 44 1 2949 54 15 18 2954 55 46 29 2958
9 Jupitar E. 54 45 49 3102 53 17 42 3108 51 49 42 3113 50 21 48 3118
10 SUN W. 25 34 10 3497 26 54 38 3496 28 15 7 3495 29 35 37 3496
Jupiter E. 43 3 43 3140 41 36 22 3144 40 9 6 3148 38 41 55 3152
α Arietis E. 50 24 13 3307 49 0 10 3321 47 36 23 3336 46 12 53 3352
Aldebaran E. 80 6 1 3071 78 37 16 3074 77 8 34 3078 75 39 57 3079
11 SUN W. 36 18 6 3494 37 38 37 3494 38 59 8 3494 40 19 39 3492
Jupiter E. 31 27 8 3172 30 0 25 3175 28 33 46 3179 27 7 12 3183
α Arietis E. 39 20 27 3454 37 59 11 3480 36 38 24 3508 35 18 9 3539
Aldebaran E. 68 17 28 3089 66 49 5 3089 65 20 42 3091 63 52 21 3091
Pollux E. 112 28 13 3102 111 0 6 3102 109 31 59 3102 108 3 52 3103
12 SUN W. 47 2 37 3484 48 23 19 3482 49 44 3 3479 51 4 51 3476
Jupiter E. 19 55 53 3216 18 30 3 3228
Aldebaran E. 56 30 35 3089 55 2 12 3087 53 33 46 3086 52 5 19 3083
Pollux E. 100 43 11 3098 99 14 59 3096 97 46 44 3094 96 18 27 3091
13 SUN W. 57 49 50 3454 59 11 6 3448 60 32 28 3443 61 53 56 3436
Aldebaran E. 44 42 18 3068 43 13 29 3064 41 44 36 3060 40 15 37 3056
Pollux E. 88 56 4 3073 87 27 21 3068 85 58 32 3063 84 29 37 3057
14 SUN W. 68 43 17 3398 70 5 36 3389 71 28 5 3379 72 50 46 3369
Aldebaran E. 32 49 11 3028 31 19 33 3022 29 49 47 3016 28 19 54 3010
Pollux E. 77 3 9 3024 75 33 26 3016 74 3 33 3007 72 33 29 2998

[page] 38

Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Noon. P.L. of. diff. IIIh. P.L. of diff. VIh P.L. of diff. IXh. P.L. of diff
° ° ° °
15 SUN W. 74 13 38 3359 75 36 42 3347 76 59 59 3337 78 23 28 3324
Jupiter W.
Aldebaran E. 26 49 53 3004 25 19 45 2998 23 49 30 2991 22 19 6 2986
Pollux E. 71 3 14 2989 69 32 48 2980 68 2 10 2970 66 31 20 2960
Regulus E. 106 56 27 2979 105 25 48 2969 103 54 56 2958 102 23 51 2947
16 SUN W. 85 24 33 3259 86 49 33 3244 88 14 50 3230 89 40 24 3214
Jupiter W. 22 5 38 2992 23 36 1 2973 25 6 48 2954 26 37 58 2935
Pollux E. 58 53 44 2902 57 21 28 2891 55 48 57 2877 54 16 9 2864
Regulus E. 94 44 47 2887 93 12 11 2873 91 39 18 2859 90 6 7 2845
17 SUN W. 96 53 1 3132 98 20 32 3115 99 48 24 3096 101 16 39 3078
Jupiter W. 34 19 46 2843 35 53 18 2825 37 27 13 2806 39 1 33 2789
α Arietis W. 32 19 44 3263 33 44 39 3206 35 10 41 3154 36 37 45 3106
Pollux E. 46 27 50 2795 44 53 16 2782 43 18 24 2766 41 43 12 2753
Regulus E. 82 15 29 2770 80 40 21 2753 79 4 52 2737 77 29 1 2720
Saturn E. 121 38 22 2717 120 2 5 2700
18 SUN W. 108 43 32 2983 110 14 6 2963 111 45 5 2944 113 16 28 2924
Jupiter W. 46 59 16 2694 48 36 4 2674 50 13 19 2655 51 50 59 2635
α Arietis W. 44 6 32 2907 45 38 42 2874 47 11 34 2841 48 45 9 2809
Pollux E. 33 42 34 2684 32 5 33 2671 30 28 14 2659 28 50 39 2648
Regulus E. 69 24 2 2632 67 45 51 2614 66 7 15 2596 64 28 14 2577
Saturn E. 111 54 47 2610 110 16 6 2592 108 37 0 2573 106 57 28 2555
19 Jupiter W. 60 6 2 2537 61 46 24 2517 63 27 14 2497 65 8 31 2478
α Arietis W. 56 42 55 2666 58 20 20 2641 59 58 20 2615 61 36 55 2589
Aldebaran W. 24 28 20 2507 26 9 24 2484 27 51 0 2461 29 33 8 2439
Regulus E. 56 6 45 2484 54 25 9 2465 52 43 7 2447 51 0 39 2428
Saturn E. 98 33 16 2459 96 51 5 2440 95 8 27 2420 93 25 21 2401
Spica n E. 110 5 8 2507 108 24 4 2487 106 42 32 2467 105 0 32 2447
20 Jupiter W. 73 41 49 2381 75 25 51 2362 77 10 20 2344 78 55 16 2326
α Arietis W. 69 58 14 2473 71 40 5 2451 73 22 27 2430 75 5 19 2410
Aldebaran W. 38 11 27 2335 39 56 35 2315 41 42 12 2296 43 28 17 2277
Regulus E. 42 21 44 2338 40 36 40 2321 38 51 11 2305 37 5 19 2289
Saturn E. 84 43 1 2306 82 57 10 2288 81 10 53 2270 79 24 9 2252
Spica n E. 96 23 35 2351 94 38 49 2331 92 53 35 2314 91 7 56 2295
21 Jupiter W. 87 46 26 2239 89 33 55 2223 91 21 48 2208 93 10 4 2193
α Arietis W. 83 46 40 2317 85 32 15 2300 87 18 15 2285 89 4 37 2269
Aldebaran W. 52 25 30 2188 54 14 15 2173 56 3 23 2157 57 52 56 2141
Regulus E. 28 10 21 2220 26 22 23 2210 24 34 10 2202 22 45 45 2196
Saturn E. 70 24 0 2167 68 34 43 2151 66 45 2 2136 64 54 58 2122
Spica n E. 82 13 9 2211 80 24 58 2195 78 36 23 2180 76 47 26 2166
22 Jupiter W. 102 16 47 2126 104 7 6 2115 105 57 42 2105 107 48 34 2095
α Arietis W. 98 1 40 2206 99 49 58 2196 101 38 31 2188 103 27 17 2179
Aldebaran W. 67 6 11 2074 68 57 51 2063 70 49 48 2051 72 42 3 2041
Pollux W. 23 18 47 2173 25 7 56 2149 26 57 41 2128 28 47 58 2109
Saturn E. 55 39 17 2056 53 47 10 2045 51 54 46 2035 50 2 6 2025
Spica n E. 67 37 32 2104 65 46 39 2093 63 55 29 2084 62 4 5 2075

[page] 39

Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Midnight. P.L. of. diff. XVh. P.L. of diff. XVIIIh. P.L. of diff. XXIh. P.L. of diff
° ° ° °
15 SUN W. 79 47 12 3313 81 11 9 3300 82 35 21 3286 83 59 49 3272
Jupiter W. 19 6 13 3036 20 35 41 3013
Aldebaran E.
Pollux E. 65 0 17 2949 63 29 0 2938 61 57 29 2927 60 25 44 2915
Regulus E. 100 52 32 2935 99 20 58 2924 97 49 10 2913 96 17 7 2899
16 SUN W. 91 6 17 3198 92 32 29 3183 93 58 59 3165 95 25 50 3148
Jupiter W. 28 9 33 2916 29 41 31 2898 31 13 53 2880 32 46 38 2862
Pollux E. 52 43 4 2851 51 9 42 2838 49 36 3 2823 48 2 5 2810
Regulus E. 88 32 38 2831 86 58 51 2816 85 24 44 2801 83 50 17 2785
17 SUN W. 102 45 15 3060 104 14 14 3040 105 43 37 3022 107 13 23 3003
Jupiter W. 40 36 16 2769 42 11 24 2751 43 46 56 2732 45 22 53 2712
α Arietis W. 38 5 47 3062 39 34 43 3020 41 4 31 2981 42 35 8 2943
Pollux E. 40 7 42 2738 38 31 53 2724 36 55 45 2711 35 19 19 2696
Regulus E. 75 52 48 2703 74 16 12 2685 72 39 12 2668 71 1 49 2650
Saturn E. 118 25 25 2682 116 48 21 2665 115 10 54 2646 113 33 2 2629
18 SUN W. 114 48 17 2904 116 20 31 2884 117 53 11 2863 119 26 17 2843
Jupiter W. 53 29 6 2615 55 7 40 2596 56 46 40 2577 58 26 7 2556
α Arietis W. 50 19 25 2779 51 54 20 2750 53 29 54 2721 55 6 6 2693
Pollux E. 27 12 49 2640 25 34 48 2632 23 56 37 2629 22 18 21 2627
Regulus E. 62 48 48 2559 61 8 56 2540 59 28 39 2521 57 47 55 2502
Saturn E. 105 17 31 2535 103 37 7 2517 101 56 17 2497 100 15 0 2478
19 Jupiter W. 66 50 15 2458 68 32 27 2438 70 15 7 2419 71 58 14 2400
α Arietis W. 63 16 5 2565 64 55 48 2541 66 36 4 2517 68 16 53 2495
Aldebaran W. 31 15 47 2417 32 58 57 2396 34 42 37 2375 36 26 47 2355
Regulus E. 49 17 44 2410 47 34 23 2391 45 50 35 2373 44 6 22 2356
Saturn E. 91 41 48 2382 89 57 48 2362 88 13 19 2344 86 28 24 2325
Spica n E. 103 18 4 2428 101 35 9 2408 99 51 45 2388 98 7 53 2370
20 Jupiter W. 80 40 38 2307 82 26 27 2290 84 12 41 2272 85 59 21 2256
α Arietis W. 76 48 40 2390 78 32 29 2371 80 16 46 2352 82 1 30 2334
Aldebaran W. 45 14 50 2258 47 1 51 2241 48 49 18 2223 50 37 11 2206
Regulus E. 35 19 3 2273 33 32 24 2258 31 45 23 2245 29 58 2 2231
Saturn E. 77 36 59 2235 75 49 23 2217 74 1 20 2200 72 12 53 2183
Spica n E. 89 21 49 2278 87 35 17 2260 85 48 19 2243 84 0 56 2227
21 Jupiter W. 94 58 42 2179 96 47 42 2164 98 37 4 2151 100 26 46 2138
α Arietis W. 90 51 22 2255 92 38 28 2241 94 25 54 2229 96 13 38 2217
Aldebaran W. 59 42 52 2127 61 33 10 2113 63 23 50 2099 65 14 51 2087
Regulus E. 20 57 11 2192 19 8 32 2194 17 19 56 2202 15 31 31 2219
Saturn E. 63 4 32 2107 61 13 43 2094 59 22 34 2081 57 31 5 2068
Spica n E. 74 58 7 2153 73 8 28 2139 71 18 28 2126 69 28 9 2115
22 Jupiter W. 109 39 41 2085 111 31 3 2076 113 22 39 2069 115 14 26 2063
α Arietis W. 105 16 16 2173 107 5 24 2167 108 54 41 2162 110 44 6 2158
Aldebaran W. 74 34 33 2032 76 27 18 2023 78 20 16 2015 80 13 27 2008
Pollux W. 30 38 43 2090 32 29 57 2075 34 21 35 2062 36 13 33 2050
Saturn E. 48 9 10 2016 46 16 0 2008 44 22 38 2000 42 29 4 1993
Spica n E. 60 12 27 2067 58 20 37 2061 56 28 37 2054 54 36 27 2049

[page] 40

Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Noon. P.L. of. diff. IIIh. P.L. of diff. VIh. P.L. of diff. IXh. P.L. of diff
° ° ° °
23 Jupiter W. 117 6 23 2056 118 58 30 2050 120 50 46 2044
Aldebaran W. 82 6 49 2001 84 0 22 1995 85 54 4 1991 87 47 53 1986
Pollux W. 38 5 49 2039 39 58 22 2030 41 51 9 2023 43 44 8 2016
Saturn E. 40 35 19 1988 38 41 25 1983 36 47 24 1979 34 53 16 1976
Spica n E. 52 44 9 2045 50 51 45 2043 48 59 17 2041 47 6 46 2040
Antares E. 98 36 21 2025 96 43 26 2019 94 50 22 2015 92 57 11 2010
24 Aldebaran W. 97 18 14 1978 99 12 23 1978 101 6 32 1980 103 0 38 1982
Pollux W. 53 11 10 1998 55 4 47 1997 56 58 26 1998 58 52 4 1999
Regulus W. 17 21 50 2060 19 13 51 2046 21 6 14 2035 22 58 54 2028
Saturn E. 25 21 59 1977 23 27 48 1981 21 33 44 1988 19 39 51 1996
Spica n E. 37 44 41 2059 35 52 39 2068 34 0 50 2079 32 9 19 2094
Antares E. 83 29 58 2002 81 36 27 2003 79 42 57 2005 77 49 30 2007
25 Pollux W. 68 19 19 2018 70 12 25 2024 72 5 22 2031 73 58 8 2039
Regulus W. 32 23 38 2026 34 16 31 2030 36 9 18 2035 38 1 57 2042
Antares E. 68 23 44 2034 66 31 2 2041 64 38 32 2050 62 46 15 2059
Mars E. 120 32 57 2239 118 45 28 2248
26 Pollux W. 83 18 37 2088 85 9 55 2099 87 0 56 2111 88 51 39 2123
Regulus W. 47 22 20 2085 49 13 42 2096 51 4 48 2107 52 55 36 2120
Saturn W.
Antares E. 53 28 52 2118 51 38 20 2132 49 48 10 2147 47 58 23 2163
α Aquilæ E. 100 14 14 2780 98 39 20 2784 97 4 31 2791 95 29 51 2800
Mars E. 109 51 32 2300 108 5 33 2313 106 19 52 2326 104 34 30 2339
27 Pollux W. 98 0 10 2194 99 48 47 2208 101 37 2 2224 103 24 53 2241
Regulus W. 62 4 47 2187 63 53 34 2201 65 42 0 2217 67 30 3 2232
Saturn W. 20 4 39 2187 21 53 26 2198 23 41 57 2209 25 30 11 2222
Antares E. 38 55 51 2256 37 8 47 2279 35 22 16 2302 33 36 20 2326
α Aquilæ E. 87 40 0 2866 86 6 58 2884 84 34 19 2905 83 2 6 2925
Mars E. 95 52 42 2412 94 9 25 2429 92 26 31 2445 90 44 0 2462
SUN E.
28 Regulus W. 76 24 30 2312 78 10 12 2328 79 55 30 2346 81 40 23 2362
Saturn W. 34 26 13 2296 36 12 19 2311 37 58 3 2327 39 43 23 2343
Spica n W. 23 9 29 2500 24 50 42 2490 26 32 10 2487 28 13 41 2489
α Aquilæ E. 75 28 12 3052 73 59 4 3083 72 30 34 3115 71 2 42 3148
Mars E. 82 17 20 2547 80 37 12 2565 78 57 29 2583 77 18 11 2601
SUN E. 115 28 2 2641 113 50 2 2658 112 12 25 2676 110 35 13 2693

[page] 41

Days of the Month. Star's Name and Position. Midnight. P.L. of. diff. XVh. P.L. of diff. XVIIIh. P.L. of diff. XXIh. P.L. of diff
° ° ° °
23 Jupiter W.
Aldebaran W. 89 41 50 1983 91 35 51 1981 93 29 56 1979 95 24 4 1977
Pollux W. 45 37 18 2010 47 30 37 2005 49 24 3 2002 51 17 34 1999
Saturn E. 32 59 4 1974 31 4 48 1973 29 10 31 1973 27 16 14 1974
Spica n E. 45 14 14 2041 43 21 43 2043 41 29 16 2046 39 36 54 2052
Antares E. 91 3 52 2007 89 10 28 2005 87 17 1 2002 85 23 30 2001
24 Aldebaran W. 104 54 41 1986 106 48 37 1989 108 42 28 1994 110 36 12 1998
Pollux W. 60 45 40 2001 62 39 13 2003 64 32 42 2008 66 26 4 2012
Regulus W. 24 51 45 2024 26 44 41 2022 28 37 41 2022 30 30 41 2024
Saturn E.
Spica n E. 30 18 10 2111 28 27 28 2132 26 37 17 2158 24 47 46 2190
Antares E. 75 56 7 2011 74 2 50 2015 72 9 39 2021 70 16 37 2026
25 Pollux W. 75 50 42 2047 77 43 3 2057 79 35 9 2066 81 27 1 2076
Regulus W. 39 54 26 2049 41 46 44 2057 43 38 50 2066 45 30 42 2075
Antares E. 60 54 13 2069 59 2 26 2080 57 10 56 2092 55 19 45 2104
Mars E. 116 58 12 2257 115 11 9 2267 113 24 21 2277 111 37 48 2289
26 Pollux W. 90 42 3 2137 92 32 6 2150 94 21 49 2165 96 11 10 2179
Regulus W. 54 46 5 2132 56 36 16 2145 58 26 7 2159 60 15 37 2172
Saturn W. 16 26 33 2175 18 15 39 2179
Antares E. 46 8 59 2180 44 20 1 2197 42 31 29 2216 40 43 25 2236
α Aquilæ E. 93 55 23 2809 92 21 7 2821 90 47 7 2835 89 13 24 2849
Mars E. 102 49 27 2353 101 4 45 2366 99 20 22 2382 97 36 21 2397
27 Pollux W. 105 12 20 2256 106 59 25 2272 108 46 5 2290 110 32 19 2310
Regulas W. 69 17 43 2247 71 5 0 2263 72 51 54 2279 74 38 24 2296
Saturn W. 27 18 6 2236 29 5 40 2250 30 52 53 2265 32 39 44 2280
Antares E. 31 50 59 2355 30 6 20 2384 28 22 22 2415 26 39 8 2450
α Aquilæ E. 81 30 19 2947 79 59 0 2972 78 28 12 2997 76 57 55 3024
Mars E. 89 1 53 2478 87 20 9 2495 85 38 48 2512 83 57 52 2530
SUN E. 122 3 58 2570 120 24 22 2588 118 45 10 2607 117 6 24 2624
28 Regulus W. 83 24 53 2379 85 8 58 2396 86 52 39 2413 88 35 55 2429
Saturn W. 41 28 20 2359 43 12 54 2375 44 57 4 2391 46 40 51 2410
Spica n W. 29 55 10 2492 31 36 35 2497 33 17 53 2505 34 58 59 2514
α Aquilæ E. 69 35 31 3183 68 9 2 3220 66 43 17 3259 65 18 18 3301
Mars E. 75 39 17 2618 74 0 47 2637 72 22 42 2655 70 45 1 2673
SUN E. 108 58 24 2711 107 21 59 2729 105 45 58 2748 104 10 22 2766

[page] 42

CONFIGURATIONS OF THE SATELLITES OF JUPITER.

At 8h, MEAN TIME.

This Table represents, at 8h after Mean Noon of each day of the month, the relative positions of Jupiter and his Satellites, as they would appear (disregarding their latitudes) in the focus of a telescope that inverts objects. Jupiter is indicated by the white circles (◯) in the centre of the page; —the Satellites by points. The numerals 1, 2, 3, or 4, annexed to the points, serve to distinguish the Satellites from each other; and their positions are such as to indicate the directions of the Satellites motions, which are in all cases to be considered as towards the numerals. When a Satellite is at its greatest elongation, the point is placed above or below the centre of the numeral. A white circle (◯) at the left or right hand of the page, denotes that the Satellite placed by the side of it is on the disc of Jupiter, and a black circle (●) that it is either behind the disc, or in the shadow, of Jupiter.

[page] 43

ECLIPSES OF THE SATELLITES OF JUPITER.
SATELLITE. Days of the Month. Mean Time. Sidereal Time. PHASES
as seen in a Telescope that inverts.
h m s h m s
I. 1 21 57 41·8 18 46 9·0 Em.
3 16 26 44·3 13 22 10·2 Em.
5* 10 55 42·6 7 58 7·2 Em.
7 5 24 44·8 2 34 8·3 Em.
8 23 53 42·0 21 10 4·1 Em.
10 18 22 44·6 15 46 5·4 Em.
12 12 51 41·3 10 22 0·9 Em.
14* 7 20 42·9 4 58 1·2 Em.
16 1 49 40·6 23 33 57·7 Em.
17 20 18 41·4 18 9 57·2 Em.
19 14 47 37·7 12 45 52·2 Em.
21* 9 16 38·9 7 21 52·2 Em.
23 3 45 35·1 1 57 47·1 Em.
24 22 14 35·5 20 33 46·2 Em.
26 16 43 31·3 15 9 40·7 Em.
28 11 12 30·8 9 45 39·0 Em.
II. 4 11 56 29·9 8 55 8·0 Im.
4 14 13 54·8 11 12 55·4 Em.
8 1 14 28·9 22 27 7·8 Im.
8 3 31 48·8 0 41 50·2 Em.
11 14 32 24·9 11 59 4·5 Im.
11 16 49 40·5 14 16 42·6 Em.
15* 6 7 34·5 3 48 37·4 Em.
18 19 25 26·2 17 20 29·8 Em.
22* 8 43 20·1 6 52 24·4 Em.
25 22 1 10·9 20 24 15·9 Em.
III. 4 13 2 20·3 10 1 9·2 Im.
4 15 10 43·8 12 9 53·8 Em.
11 17 5 22·4 14 32 27·1 Im.
11 19 13 32·8 16 40 58·6 Em.
18 21 7 43·8 19 3 4·2 Im.
18 23 15 43·9 21 11 25·4 Em.
26 1 9 53·1 23 33 29·2 Im.
26 3 17 43·8 1 41 40·9 Em.

[page] 44

APPROXIMATE SIDEREAL TIME

OF THE

OCCULTATIONS OF JUPITER'S SATELLITES BY JUPITER,

AND OF THE

TRANSITS OF THE SATELLITES AND THEIR SHADOWS OVER THE DISC OF THE PLANET.

Satellite. OCCULTATIONS. TRANSITS OF SATELLITES. TRANSITS OF SHADOWS.
Immersion. Emersion. Ingress. Egress. Ingress. Egress.
d h m d h m d h m d h m d h m d h m
I. 1 15 15 In the Shadow. 2 12 33 2 14 50 0 19 20 1 21 28
3 9 52 4* 7 10 4 9 27 2 13 56 2 16 4
5* 4 28 6 1 47 6* 4 4 4 8 31 4 10 40
7 23 5 7 20 23 8 22 40 6* 3 7 6* 5 16
8 17 41 9 15 0 9 17 17 8 21 43 8 23 51
10 12 18 11 9 37 11 11 54 9 16 19 9 18 27
12* 6 55 13* 4 14 13* 6 31 11 10 55 11 13 3
14 1 32 15 22 50 15 1 7 13* 5 31 13* 7 39
15 20 9 16 17 27 16 19 44 15 0 6 15 2 15
17 14 46 18 12 4 18 14 21 16 18 42 16 20 51
19 9 23 20* 6 41 20 8 58 18 13 18 18 15 26
21* 4 0 22 1 18 22 3 35 20* 7 54 20 10 2
23 22 37 23 19 55 23 22 12 22 2 30 22 4 38
24 17 14 25 14 32 25 16 49 23 21 5 24 23 14
26 11 51 27 9 9 27 11 27 25 15 41 25 17 50
28* 6 28 27 10 17 27 12 25
II. 4* 6 8 4 8 48 2 11 21 2 14 1 2 14 10 2 16 28
7 19 43 8 22 22 6 0 55 6* 3 35 6* 3 44 6* 6 2
11 9 18 11 11 57 9 14 30 9 17 10 9 17 17 9 19 35
15 22 53 In the Shadow. 13* 4 5 13* 6 45 13* 6 51 13 9 8
18 12 29 16 17 41 16 20 21 16 20 24 17 22 41
22 2 5 20* 7 17 20 9 57 20 9 58 20 12 15
25 15 42 23 20 53 24 23 33 24 23 31 24 1 48
27 10 30 27 13 10 27 13 5 27 15 22
III. 4* 4 37 4* 7 5 7 18 58 8 21 26 0 19 41 1 21 50
11 9 19 11 11 48 15 23 42 15 2 11 8 0 11 8 2 19
18 14 5 18 16 34 22* 4 29 22* 6 58 15* 4 41 15* 6 49
25 18 54 25 21 22 22 9 11 22 11 19

[page] 45

Days of the Month. For correcting the Places of the Fixed Stars.
At Mean Midnight,
Mean Time of Transit of the First Point of Aries. Mean Equinoctial Time, adding 0d·745186. From Mean Noon of January 1.
Logarithms of Days of the Year. Fraction of the Year.
A B C D Days.
h m s
1 -1·1028 +1·1749 -9·3678 +9·7731 3 14 37·30 315 31 ·085
2 1·1110 1·1676 9·3626 9·7524 3 10 41·39 316 32 ·088
3 1·1189 1·1601 9·3574 9·7305 3 6 45·49 317 33 ·090
4 -1·1265 +1·1524 -9·3522 +9·7074 3 2 49·58 318 34 ·093
5 1·1339 1·1444 9·3470 9·6830 2 58 53·67 319 35 ·096
6 1·1410 1·1360 9·3418 9·6572 2 54 57·76 320 36 ·099
7 -1·1478 +1·1274 -9·3366 +9·6299 2 51 1·85 321 37 ·101
8 1·1544 1·1185 9·3313 9·6009 2 47 5·94 322 38 ·104
9 1·1608 1·1093 9·3261 9·5699 2 43 10·03 323 39 ·107
10 -1·1669 +1·0997 -9·3209 +9·5367 2 39 14·12 324 40 ·110
11 1·1728 1·0897 9·3157 9·5010 2 35 18·21 325 41 ·112
12 1·1785 1·0794 9·3105 9·4624 2 31 22·30 326 42 ·115
13 -1·1839 +1·0689 -9·3052 +9·4204 2 27 26·40 327 43 ·118
14 1·1892 1·0578 9·3000 9·3743 2 23 30·49 328 44 ·120
15 1·1943 1·0463 9·2948 9·3233 2 19 34·58 329 45 ·123
16 -1·1992 +1·0343 -9·2896 +9·2660 2 15 38·67 330 46 ·126
17 1·2039 1·0218 9·2843 9·2011 2 11 42·76 331 47 ·129
18 1·2085 1·0089 9·2791 9·1256 2 7 46·85 332 48 ·131
19 -1·2128 +0·9954 -9·2738 +9·0355 2 3 50·95 333 49 ·134
20 1·2169 0·9814 9·2686 8·9238 1 59 55·04 334 50 ·137
21 1·2209 0·9668 9·2633 8·7760 1 55 59·13 335 51 ·140
22 -1·2247 +0·9516 -9·2581 +8·5551 1 52 3·22 336 52 ·142
23 1·2284 0·9356 9·2528 +8·0934 1 48 7·31 337 53 ·145
24 1·2319 0·9190 9·2476 -8·0253 1 44 11·41 338 54 ·148
25 -1·2351 +0·9015 -9·2423 -8·5198 1 40 15·50 339 55 ·151
26 1·2383 0·8832 9·2370 8·7419 1 36 19·59 340 56 ·153
27 1·2413 0·8639 9·2317 8·8848 1 32 23·68 341 57 ·156
28 1·2441 0·8436 9·2263 8·9903 1 28 27·78 342 58 ·159
29 -1·2469 +0·8222 -9·2210 -9·0734 1 24 31·87 343 59 ·162

[page] 46

AT APPARENT NOON.

Days of the Week. Days of the Month. THE SUN'S Sidereal Time of the Semidiam. passing the Meridian.* Equation of Time, to be added to Apparent Time. Diff for 1 hour.
Right Ascension. Diff for 1 hour. Declination. Diff. for 1 hour.
h m s s ° m s m s s
Sat. 1 22 47 55·06 9·349 S. 7 38 48·1 57·04 1 5·36 12 38·75 0·507
Sun. 2 22 51 39·43 9·329 7 15 59·1 57·30 1 5·28 12 26·58 0·526
Mon. 3 22 55 23·33 9·310 6 53 3·8 57·55 1 5·21 12 13·97 0·545
Tues. 4 22 59 6·76 9·290 6 30 2·7 57·79 1 5·14 12 0·89 0·563
Wed. 5 23 2 49·73 9·274 6 6 56·0 57·99 1 5·08 11 47·34 0·581
Thur. 6 23 6 32·31 9·256 5 43 44·2 58·18 1 5·02 11 33·40 0·598
Frid. 7 23 10 14·45 9·240 5 20 27·8 58·37 1 4·95 11 19·04 0·615
Sat. 8 23 13 56·21 9·225 4 57 7·0 58·53 1 4·90 11 4·28 0·630
Sun. 9 23 17 37·60 9·210 4 33 42·3 58·68 1 4·84 10 49·15 0·644
Mon. 10 23 21 18·64 9·195 4 10 14·1 58·80 1 4·79 10 33·69 0·660
Tues. 11 23 24 59·32 9·182 3 46 42·9 58·92 1 4·74 10 17·86 0·678
Wed. 12 23 28 39·69 9·169 3 23 8·9 59·02 1 4·70 10 1·71 0·685
Thur. 13 23 32 19·74 9·157 2 59 32·5 59·09 1 4·66 9 45·26 0·698
Frid. 14 23 35 59·50 9·146 2 35 54·3 59·16 1 4·61 9 28·52 0·709
Sat. 15 23 39 39·00 9·134 2 12 14·4 59·20 1 4·58 9 11·50 0·720
Sun. 16 23 43 18·22 9·125 1 48 33·6 59·24 1 4·55 8 54·22 0·729
Mon. 17 23 46 57·23 9·116 1 24 51·9 59·25 1 4·52 8 36·72 0·738
Tues. 18 23 50 36·01 9·108 1 1 9·8 59·25 1 4·49 8 19·01 0·747
Wed. 19 23 54 14·61 9·100 0 37 27·8 59·24 1 4·46 8 1·09 0·754
Thur. 20 23 57 53·02 9·095 S. 0 13 46·1 59·21 1 4·44 7 43·00 0·759
Frid. 21 0 1 31·29 9·090 N. 0 9 55·0 59·17 1 4·42 7 24·78 0·765
Sat. 22 0 5 9·45 9·085 0 33 35·0 59·11 1 4·41 7 6·43 0·770
Sun. 23 0 8 47·48 9·082 0 57 13·6 59·04 1 4·39 6 47·95 0·772
Mon. 24 0 12 25·44 9·080 1 20 50·5 58·95 1 4·38 6 29·42 0·775
Tues. 25 0 16 3·35 9·078 1 44 25·3 58·84 1 4·38 6 10·82 0·777
Wed. 26 0 19 41·21 9·078 2 7 57·5 58·74 1 4·37 5 52·17 0·776
Thur. 27 0 23 19·08 9·079 2 31 27·2 58·61 1 4·37 5 33·55 0·776
Frid. 28 0 26 56·96 9·080 2 54 53·8 58·47 1 4·38 5 14·92 0·774
Sat. 29 0 30 34·87 9·082 3 18 17·1 58·31 1 4·38 4 56·34 0·773
Sun. 30 0 34 12·84 9·085 3 41 36·5 58·15 1 4·39 4 37·80 0·769
Mon. 31 0 37 50·89 9·090 4 4 52·0 57·90 1 4·40 4 19·35 0·764
Tues. 32 0 41 29·05 N. 4 28 3·0 1 4·42 4 1·01

* Mean Time of the Semidiameter passing may be found by subtracting 0s·18 from the Sidereal Time.

[page] 47

AT MEAN NOON.

Days of the Week. Days of the Month. THE SUN'S Equation of Time, to be added to Apparent Time. Sidereal Time.
Right Ascension. Declination. Semidiam.*
h m s ° m s h m s
Sat. 1 22 47 53·09 S. 7 39 0·1 16 9·1 12 38·85 22 35 14·24
Sun. 2 22 51 37·49 7 16 11·0 16 8·9 12 26·69 22 39 10·80
Mon. 3 22 55 21·43 6 53 15·5 16 8·6 12 14·08 22 43 7·35
Tues. 4 22 59 4·90 6 30 14·2 16 8·4 12 1·00 22 47 3·90
Wed. 5 23 2 47·91 6 7 7·4 16 8·1 11 47·45 22 51 0·46
Thur. 6 23 6 30·52 5 43 55·4 16 7·9 11 33·51 22 54 57·01
Frid. 7 23 10 12·71 5 20 38·8 16 7·6 11 19·15 22 58 53·56
Sat. 8 23 13 54·51 4 57 17·8 16 7·3 11 4·39 23 2 50·12
Sun. 9 23 17 35·94 4 33 52·9 16 7·1 10 49·27 23 6 46·67
Mon. 10 23 21 17·02 4 10 24·5 16 6·8 10 33·80 23 10 43·22
Tues. 11 23 24 57·74 3 46 53·0 16 6·5 10 17·97 23 14 39·77
Wed. 12 23 28 38·15 3 23 18·7 16 6·3 10 1·82 23 18 36·33
Thur. 13 23 32 18·25 2 59 42·1 16 6·0 9 45·37 23 22 32·88
Frid. 14 23 35 58·06 2 36 3·6 16 5·8 9 28·63 23 26 29·43
Sat. 15 23 39 37·60 2 12 23·5 16 5·5 9 11·61 23 30 25·99
Sun. 16 23 43 16·87 1 48 42·4 16 5·2 8 54·33 23 34 22·54
Mon. 17 23 46 55·92 1 25 0·4 16 5·0 8 36·83 23 38 19·09
Tues. 18 23 50 34·75 1 1 18·0 16 4·7 8 19·11 23 42 15·64
Wed. 19 23 54 13·39 0 37 35·7 16 4·4 8 1·19 23 46 12·20
Thur. 20 23 57 51·85 S. 0 13 53·7 16 4·2 7 43·10 23 50 8·75
Frid. 21 0 1 30·17 N. 0 9 47·7 16 3·9 7 24·87 23 54 5·30
Sat. 22 0 5 8·37 0 33 28·0 16 3·6 7 6·52 23 58 1·85
Sun. 23 0 8 46·45 0 57 6·9 16 3·3 6 48·04 0 1 58·41
Mon. 24 0 12 24·46 1 20 44·1 16 3·1 6 29·50 0 5 54·96
Tues. 25 0 16 2·41 1 44 19·2 16 2·8 6 10·90 0 9 51·51
Wed. 26 0 19 40·32 2 7 51·8 16 2·5 5 52·25 0 13 48·07
Thur. 27 0 23 18·24 2 31 21·8 16 2·2 5 33·62 0 17 44·62
Frid. 28 0 26 56·16 2 54 48·7 16 2·0 5 14·99 0 21 41·17
Sat. 29 0 30 34·12 3 18 12·3 16 1·7 4 56·40 0 25 37·72
Sun. 30 0 34 12·14 3 41 32·0 16 1·4 4 37·86 0 29 34·28
Mon. 31 0 37 50·24 4 4 47·8 16 1·1 4 19·41 0 33 30·83
Tues. 32 0 41 28·44 N. 4 27 59·1 16 0·8 4 1·06 0 37 27·38

* The Semidiameter for Apparent Noon may be assumed the same as that for Mean Noon.

[page] 48

MEAN TIME.

Days of the Month. THE SUN'S Logarithm of the Radius Vector of the Earth. THE MOON'S
Longitude. Latitude. Semidiameter. Horizontal Parallax.
Noon. Noon. Noon. Noon. Midnight. Noon. Midnight.
°
1 340 27 54·3 N. 0·69 9·9962988 15 52·7 15 45·7 58 16·3 57 50·3
2 341 28 1·7 0·58 9·9964117 15 38·7 15 32·1 57 24·9 57 0·6
3 342 28 7·7 0·46 9·9965256 15 25·8 15 20·0 56 37·5 56 16·0
4 343 28 12·1 0·34 9·9966405 15 14·5 15 9·6 55 56·1 55 37·8
5 344 28 14·7 0·22 9·9967561 15 5·0 15 0·9 55 21·2 55 6·2
6 345 28 15·8 N. 0·10 9·9968723 14 57·3 14 54·0 54 52·7 54 40·9
7 346 28 15·1 S. 0·01 9·9969891 14 51·2 14 48·8 54 30·6 54 21·7
8 347 28 12·7 0·10 9·9971062 14 46·7 14 45·0 54 14·1 54 7·8
9 348 28 8·5 0·18 9·9972235 14 43·6 14 42·6 54 2·7 53 58·8
10 349 28 2·5 0·22 9·9973412 14 41·8 14 41·5 53 56·1 53 54·9
11 350 27 54·3 0·24 9·9974590 14 41·5 14 41·9 53 54·9 53 56·2
12 351 27 44·3 0·23 9·9975770 14 42·6 14 43·8 53 59·0 54 3·3
13 352 27 32·2 0·19 9·9976951 14 45·4 14 47·4 54 9·1 54 16·6
14 353 27 17·9 0·13 9·9978134 14 50·0 14 53·0 54 25·9 54 37·0
15 354 27 1·4 S. 0·04 9·9979319 14 56·6 15 0·6 54 50·1 55 5·1
16 355 26 42·6 N. 0·06 9·9980507 15 5·4 15 10·6 55 22·4 55 41·6
17 356 26 21·6 0·18 9·9981699 15 16·3 15 22·6 56 2·7 56 25·8
18 357 25 58·3 0·30 9·9982895 15 29·4 15 36·6 56 50·6 57 17·0
19 358 25 32·7 0·42 9·9984097 15 44·1 15 51·8 57 44·5 58 12·8
20 359 25 4·8 0·53 9·9985304 15 59·6 16 7·3 58 41·3 59 9·6
21 0 24 34·7 0·63 9·9986518 16 14·6 16 21·6 59 36·7 60 2·3
22 1 24 2·5 0·70 9·9987741 16 28·0 16 33·4 60 25·6 60 45·6
23 2 23 27·9 0·77 9·9988970 16 37·9 16 41·2 61 1·9 61 14·1
24 3 22 51·4 0·78 9·9990207 16 43·2 16 43·9 61 21·6 61 24·1
25 4 22 12·6 0·79 9·9991452 16 43·2 16 41·1 61 21·4 61 13·9
26 5 21 31·8 0·77 9·9992706 16 37·8 16 33·3 61 1·7 60 45·2
27 6 20 49·2 0·70 9·9993965 16 27·8 16 21·4 60 24·8 60 1·3
28 7 20 4·6 0·63 9·9995231 16 14·3 16 6·7 59 35·3 59 7·5
29 8 19 18·1 0·53 9·9996501 15 58·8 15 50·9 58 38·5 58 9·6
30 9 18 29·7 0·40 9·9997774 15 43·1 15 35·4 57 40·8 57 12·7
31 10 17 39·6 0·28 9·9999050 15 28·1 15 21·2 56 45·8 56 20·6
32 11 16 47·7 N. 0·16 0·0000327 15 14·8 15 9·0 55 57·2 55 35·8

[page] 49

MEAN TIME.

Days of the Week. Days of the Month. THE MOON'S
Longitude. Latitude. Age. Meridian Passage.
Noon. Midnight. Noon. Midnight. Noon.
° ° ° ° d h m
Sat. 1 237 51 44·5 244 39 26·1 N. 2 57 13·9 N. 2 26 41·5 20·8 17 47·8
Sun. 2 251 20 40·4 257 55 48·9 1 54 35·2 1 21 25·5 21·8 18 41·3
Mon. 3 264 25 19·6 270 49 41·5 N. 0 47 40·5 N. 0 13 46·4 22·8 19 34·8
Tues. 4 277 9 26·3 283 25 5·0 S. 0 19 52·6 S. 0 52 53·5 23·8 20 27·4
Wed. 5 289 37 7·6 295 46 4·1 1 24 55·5 1 55 39·6 24·8 21 18·5
Thur. 6 301 52 20·7 307 56 23·2 2 24 48·1 2 52 4·2 25·8 22 7·3
Frid. 7 313 58 32·1 319 59 8·6 3 17 12·8 3 40 0·3 26·8 22 53·7
Sat. 8 325 58 29·1 331 56 48·6 4 0 15·0 4 17 44·8 27·8 23 37·8
Sun. 9 337 54 19·4 343 51 12·7 4 32 21·7 4 43 57·5 28·8
Mon. 10 349 47 39·1 355 43 47·0 4 52 26·1 4 57 42·9 0·0 0 20·1
Tues. 11 1 39 46·9 7 35 47·9 4 59 45·0 4 58 31·7 1·0 1 1·1
Wed. 12 13 32 1·4 19 28 38·5 4 54 3·4 4 46 22·7 2·0 1 41·6
Thur. 13 25 25 54·0 31 24 4·6 4 35 32·7 4 21 39·2 3·0 2 22·4
Frid. 14 37 23 28·6 43 24 27·9 4 4 48·8 3 45 9·1 4·0 3 4·4
Sat. 15 49 27 26·5 55 32 51·4 3 22 49·7 2 58 1·3 5·0 3 48·3
Sun. 16 61 41 12·3 67 53 0·5 2 30 55·8 2 1 47·0 6·0 4 34·9
Mon. 17 74 8 49·3 80 29 13·1 1 30 50·1 S. 0 58 22·7 7·0 5 24·8
Tues. 18 86 54 45·5 93 25 59·9 S. 0 24 43·9 N. 0 9 43·8 8·0 6 18·1
Wed. 19 100 3 27·1 106 47 34·9 N. 0 44 36·3 1 19 25·7 9·0 7 14·4
Thur. 20 113 38 43·9 120 37 7·8 1 53 41·5 2 26 49·9 10·0 8 12·6
Frid. 21 127 42 51·4 134 55 46·2 2 58 15·7 3 27 22·0 11·0 9 11·3
Sat. 22 142 15 32·6 149 41 35·9 3 53 29·1 4 16 1·2 12·0 10 9·2
Sun. 23 157 13 7·0 164 49 2·2 4 34 23·5 4 48 5·3 13·0 11 5·7
Mon. 24 172 28 7·1 180 8 56·0 4 56 43·2 5 0 2·0 14·0 12 0·7
Tues. 25 187 50 0·1 195 29 47·8 4 57 55·3 4 50 27·1 15·0 12 54·7
Wed. 26 203 6 51·5 210 39 52·1 4 37 50·1 4 20 26·4 16·0 13 48·4
Thur. 27 218 7 39·3 225 29 18·3 3 58 44·7 3 33 19·2 17·0 14 42·5
Frid. 28 232 44 6·8 239 51 38·6 3 4 46·6 2 33 46·1 18·0 15 37·3
Sat. 29 246 51 41·2 253 44 13·9 2 0 55·0 1 26 50·2 19·0 16 32·7
Sun. 30 260 29 27·3 267 7 40·3 N. 0 52 6·0 N. 0 17 13·4 20·0 17 28·1
Mon. 31 273 39 18·3 280 4 53·1 S. 0 17 19·5 S. 0 51 7·4 21·0 18 22·5
Tues. 32 286 24 58·0 292 40 8·4 S. 1 23 47·9 S. 1 55 1·8 22·0 19 14·9

[page] 50

MEAN TIME.
THE MOON'S RIGHT ASCENTION AND DECLINATION.
Hours. Right Ascension. Declination. Diff. Dec. for 10m.
SATURDAY 1.
h m s °
0 15 45 9·47 S. 16 49 19·5 99·19
1 15 47 26·62 16 59 14·6 98·11
2 15 49 43·84 17 9 3·2 97·02
3 15 52 1·12 17 18 45·3 95·92
4 15 54 18·46 17 28 20·8 94·81
5 15 56 35·86 17 37 49·7 93·70
6 15 58 53·33 17 47 11·9 92·58
7 16 1 10·86 17 56 27·4 91·46
8 16 3 28·45 18 5 36·2 90·33
9 16 5 46·11 18 14 38·1 89·19
10 16 8 3·82 18 23 33·3 88·04
11 16 10 21·60 18 32 21·5 86·89
12 16 12 39·43 18 41 2·9 85·74
13 16 14 57·33 18 49 37·3 84·57
14 16 17 15·28 18 58 4·8 83·41
15 16 19 33·30 19 6 25·2 82·23
16 16 21 51·37 19 14 38·6 81·05
17 16 24 9·49 19 22 44·9 79·86
18 16 26 27·67 19 30 44·1 78·67
19 16 28 45·90 19 38 36·1 77·47
20 16 31 4·19 19 46 20·9 76·27
21 16 33 22·52 19 53 58·6 75·06
22 16 35 40·91 20 1 29·0 73·85
23 16 37 59·34 S. 20 8 52·1 72·64

SUNDAY 2.

0 16 40 17·82 S. 20 16 7·9 71·41
1 16 42 36·34 20 23 16·4 70·19
2 16 44 54·91 20 30 17·5 68·96
3 16 47 13·52 20 37 11·2 67·72
4 16 49 32·16 20 43 57·5 66·48
5 16 51 50·85 20 50 36·4 65·24
6 16 54 9·57 20 57 7·9 63·99
7 16 56 28·33 21 3 31·8 62·74
8 16 58 47·11 21 9 48·3 61·49
9 17 1 5·93 21 15 57·3 60·24
10 17 3 24·77 21 21 58·7 58·98
11 17 5 43·64 21 27 52·5 57·71
12 17 8 2·54 21 33 38·8 56·45
13 17 10 21·46 21 39 17·5 55·18
14 17 12 40·39 21 44 48·6 53·91
15 17 14 59·35 21 50 12·0 52·64
16 17 17 18·31 21 55 27·8 51·36
17 17 19 37·29 22 0 36·0 50·08
18 17 21 56·28 22 5 36·5 48·80
19 17 24 15·27 22 10 29·3 47·52
20 17 26 34·27 22 15 14·4 46·23
21 17 28 53·27 22 19 51·8 44·95
22 17 31 12·26 22 24 21·5 43·66
23 17 33 31·25 22 28 43·5 42·37
24 17 35 50·23 S. 22 32 57·7

MONDAY 3.

0 17 35 50·23 S. 22 32 57·7 41·08
1 17 38 9·20 22 37 4·2 39·79
2 17 40 28·16 22 41 3·0 38·50
3 17 42 47·10 22 44 54·0 37·21
4 17 45 6·02 22 48 37·2 35·91
5 17 47 24·91 22 52 12·7 34·62
6 17 49 43·79 22 55 40·4 33·33
7 17 52 2·63 22 59 0·4 32·03
8 17 54 21·44 23 2 12·6 30·74
9 17 56 40·21 23 5 17·0 29·44
10 17 58 58·95 23 8 13·6 28·15
11 18 1 17·65 23 11 2·5 26·85
12 18 3 36·30 23 13 43·6 25·56
13 18 5 54·90 23 16 17·0 24·27
14 18 8 13·46 23 18 42·6 22·98
15 18 10 31·95 23 21 0·5 21·68
16 18 12 50·39 23 23 10·6 20·39
17 18 15 8·77 23 25 12·9 19·10
18 1