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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
, fertilisation by bees, 54, 56 Diel, Pear grafts to apple, but not reciprocally, 419 n 3 Digitalis: Conversion, 127; K lreuter's crosses, 412; May be fertilised after trans planting, 82; Reciprocal crosses not identical, 414 n 3; Visited by insect, 57 Dionaea (Venus' fly trap), insect trap, 382 Diptera: Fertilise flowers, 55, 64, 66, 68; Larval stage not seen in some, 574; Rapid rate of increase, 207 Divergence and Diversification: Fossils of Silurian and Eocene, 247; Insects in Madeira, 231
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F1767    Periodical contribution:     Darwin, C. R. 1874. [Irritability of Pinguicula]. Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette no. 2 (4 July): 15.   Text   Image   PDF
of flowers by insects. Only lately, through the kindness of Dr. ASA GRAY,2 we have had occasion to lay before our readers the curious arrangements by which Droseras and Sarracenias obtain some at least of their nourishment by entrapping and digesting insects. Dr. SANDERSON3 has shown us how the movement of the leaves of Venus' Fly-trap Dionæa is accompanied by electrical phenomena, as in the case of the muscles of animals. One of the most curious illustrations yet made known, showing the
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F1217    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1875. Insectivorous plants. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
transmission of the motor impulse and mechanism of the movements Re-expansion of the lobes. THIS plant, commonly called Venus' fly-trap, from the rapidity and force of its movements, is one of the most wonderful in the world.* It is a member of the small family of the Droseraceae, and is found only in the eastern part of North Carolina, growing in damp situations. The roots are small; those of a moderately fine plant which I examined consisted of two branches about 1 inch in length, springing from a
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A664    Review:     A. M. 1875. [Review of] Insectivorous plants. Garden, an illustrated weekly journal of gardening in all its branches 8 (24 July): 63-65.   Text   Image
of bending, either independently or conjointly with the rest, covering and detaining by their secretion any small insect that they may have captured. Fig. 2 shows one-half of them so bent over, and the other erect. In a third species, Venus' Fly-trap (Dion a muscipula) the tentacles are replaced, or, at least, their office is performed by a series of spines along the margin of the leaf, like a chevaux-defrise, which, when the two sides of the leaf close together, interlace, and act as prison bars
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A314    Pamphlet:     Miall, L. C. 1883. The life and work of Charles Darwin: a lecture delivered to the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society, on February 6th, 1883. Leeds: Richard Jackson.   Text   Image   PDF
57 until the characteristic marsupial bones were revealed. The morphologists never predicted anything at all, and looked upon Cuvier's triumph as something rather low. They were satisfied with pointing out that he could not have done the same thing in every case. Darwin's power of reasoning from the seen to the unseen might be illustrated by nearly every chapter of his writings, but I give only a single instance. When he was studying the Dionasa (Venus' fly-trap), he noticed that the trap, if
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A75    Book:     Bettany, G.T. 1887. Life of Charles Darwin. London: Walter Scott.   Text   Image
little has been made out in comparison with what remains unexplained and unknown. The facts relating to Venus' fly-trap (Dion a muscipula) and other members of the order to which the sun-dew belongs were better known, but Darwin elicited new truths by his ingenious and varied experiments. The rapidity with which the two lobes of the leaf of dion a close together when anything touches the tiny spikes which stand up vertically from the upper surface of the lobes, is astonishing, and any insect
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F1225    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1888. Insectivorous plants. 2d edition. Revised by Francis Darwin. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
transmission of the motor impulse and mechanism of the movements Re-expansion of the lobes. THIS plant, commonly called Venus' fly-trap, from the rapidity and force of its movements, is one of the most wonderful in the world.* It is a member of the small family of the Droserace , and is found only in the eastern part of North Carolina, growing in damp situations. The roots are small; those of a moderately fine plant which I examined consisted of two branches about 1 inch in length, springing from a
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A313    Pamphlet:     Harmer, S. F and W. G. Ridewood eds. 1910. Memorials of Charles Darwin: a collection of manuscripts portraits medals books and natural history specimens to commemorate the centenary of his birth and the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of "The origin of species" 2d edition. British Museum (Natural History). Special guide no. 4.   Text   Image   PDF
fertilised by Insects, 1862, and The Effects of Cross and Self Fertilisation in the Vegetable Kingdom, 1876. In Case 20, a table-case near the last, is exhibited a series of models, drawings and specimens of Insectivorous Plants, such as the Bladderwort, Pitcher Plant, Butterwort, Sundew and Venus' Fly-trap. Darwin's book, Insectivorous Plants, 1875, contains the first detailed account of the remarkable method of nutrition characteristic of these plants. A copy of the book is shown in Case 3
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A622    Periodical contribution:     Ghiselin, Michael T. 2009. Darwin: A reader's guide. Occasional Papers of the California Academy of Sciences (155 [12 February]), 185 pp, 3 figs.   Text   PDF
chapter is devoted to just one of these, the Venus' fly-trap, Dionaea muscipula. It differs in having a much different, and more spectacular, way of capturing insects and in the details of how these are digested. But the trap is, like that of Drosera, a modified leaf. Aldrovanda vesiculosa, treated in the fourteenth chapter, is treated as a miniature, rootless, Dionaea, which lives submerged under water and captures crustaceans and insect larvae. In the fifteenth chapter three more genera are briefly
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