Show results per page.
Search Help New search
Sort by
Results 1-50 of 497 for « +text:humboldt +(language:English) +(+name:darwin +name:charles +name:robert) »
    Page 1 of 10. Go to page:     NEXT
90%
CUL-DAR195.1.37    Abstract:    [Undated]   Humboldt Vol 3 p. 229   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. 'Humboldt Vol 3 p. 229' CUL-DAR195.1.37 Transcribed by Kees Rookmaaker. (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/) [37] Humboldt. vol. 3 p. 229 good sentence on Negro Indian not blushing. — 2
77%
CUL-DAR42.162    Abstract:    [Undated]   Humboldt `Personal narrative' IV: 384   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. Humboldt, Personal narrative IV: 384. CUL-DAR42.162 Transcribed by John van Wyhe (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/) [162] Humboldt Pers. Narr vol 4 p. 384 Prodigous formation of conglomerate East of Andes in Caraccas like Patagonia Humboldt 1819-29, vol. 4, p. 384: This prodigious extension of red sandstone, in the low grounds that stretch along the East of the Andes, is one of the most striking phenomena, with which the study of rocks in the equinoctial regions
76%
CUL-DAR40.84    Abstract:    [Undated]   [Humboldt] `Personal narrative' vol 6: [reference incomplete]   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. [Humboldt] `Personal narrative' vol 6. CUL-DAR40.84 Transcribed by Kees Rookmaaker. (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/). 84 Vol. VI p. 69 Pers. Narrative Whole Eastern S. America elevated horizontally. Patagonia Pampas extending far to the North Venezuela (Savannah N. America ?) P. 71 extent of plains, total of llanos 105, 200 square leagues. (The Mediterranean has only 89 000 square do) Mem. S. Africa no. [illeg, sentence deleted] Humboldt 1819-29, vol. 6, pp. 69, 71
72%
CUL-DAR41.73    Abstract:    [Undated]   [Humboldt] `A geognostical essay on the superposition of rocks in both hemispheres' 222   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. [Humboldt] `Superposition'. CUL-DAR41.73 Transcribed by Kees Rookmaaker. (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/). 73 note (a) Humboldt states (superposition c p. 222) that on the road from Acapulco to Mexico, porphyries coarse grained granites dip to the NW the latter sometimes to SE.1 Does it hence appear probable that the two prevalent systems of the Americas intersect each other in Mexico? (b) Note It is stated, in Cleveland's Geology of the United States, that the
72%
CUL-DAR42.117v    Abstract:    [Undated]   Humboldt `Personal narrative' VI: 586, 25; Notebook RN pp 84, 105, 124   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. Humboldt Personal narrative VI: 586, 25; Notebook RN pp 84, 105, 124. CUL-DAR42.117v Transcribed by John van Wyhe (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/) [117v] Humboldt vol VI p. 5861 thinks Tertiary formation of Cumana belongs to West Indian group p. 25. Santiago Note book .2 some remarks about shoaling of harbours Elevation. N. America. R. N. p. 843 Elevation N. of Lima R N. p 105 from Ulloa Elevation Demerara R. N. p 124 [The three numerical calculations on this page
71%
CUL-DAR42.100    Abstract:    [Undated]   Humboldt `Personal narrative' VII: 52   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. Humboldt `Personal narrative' VII: 52. CUL-DAR42.100 Transcribed by Kees Rookmaaker. (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/). 100 Vol. VII. p. 52. Pers. Narr:1 This tertiary formation (talking a calcareous agglomerate of Cuba.) no doubt belongs to that of the coast of Cumana, Carthagena and the great land of Guadaloupe, of which I have spoken in my geognostic table The Pot. labiata2 certainly found with the Mactra at Buenos Ayres (copied) 1 Humboldt 1819-1829, vol. 7, p. 52
66%
CUL-DAR189.130    Abstract:    [Undated]   Humboldt `Personal narrative' vol. 4: 527   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. Humboldt `Personal narrative' vol. 4: 527 CUL-DAR189.130 Transcribed by Kees Rookmaaker. (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/). 130 Humboldt Pers. Narr. Vol 4 p. 527. Monkey's eyes rather fill with tears 25 mem Humboldt 1819-29, vol. 4, p. 527: The titi of the Oroonoko (simia sciurea), illdrawn hitherto, though well known in our collections, is called bititeni by the Maypure Indians. It is very common to the South of the cataracts. It's face is white; and a little spot of
59%
CUL-DAR73.116-117    Abstract:    [Undated]   Woods M.J; [reference incomplete]; Review of Bell J.W.S `Botanical Gazette' 1: 328; 2: 92; 114   Text   Image
Darwin Online [page] 116 Bot. Gazette vol I. p 328 Mr J. Woods on Atriplex several of the species, or at least several forms have 2 sorts of seeds. Those of the smaller calyces are slightly depressed, smooth black shining; while those found in the larger calyces are much larger, so much so as to have occasionally 3 times the diameter of the upper seeds, they are considerably more of a dark chesnut colour, wrinkled or shagreened. In Aspects of Nature by Humboldt, tranlated by Mrs. Sabine, there
56%
CUL-DAR73.100-102    Abstract:    [Undated]   Bromfield `Phytologist' 3: 830ff, 966   Text   Image
Darwin Online [page] 100 p. 830. Dr Bromfield remarks that those localities are not the richest in species where the vegetation is most luxuriant: indeed the most unpromising sports to the eye, barren sandy fields wastes often yield an ampler harvest than the very green wood conceals beneath its leafy bowers. So Humboldt has remarked that the damp forests of the Orinoco produce a majestic vegetation, but far poorer in number of species than the burnt-up campos of Brazil - again the astonishing
56%
CUL-DAR73.98-99    Abstract:    [Undated]   Babington; Bromfield; Henslow `Phytologist' 3: 544; 573, 597; 651   Text   Image
Darwin Online [page] 98 p. 544. Mr Babington believes that the plants of the Robertsonian Saxifrages with dentate leaves are by far more common in Ireland, those with them crenate in the Pyrenees. — (Yet both kinds have been found in both countries.) p. 573. Dr Bromfield remarks how many plants we have given how few we have received from N. America — (tide of immigration in that direction C.D) but yet few corn-field imported weeds there. Thinks because fewer social plants, which is in
51%
CUL-DAR71.1-5    Abstract:    [Undated]   Catalogue of Books (not Journal s)   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. 'Catalogue of Books (not Journals)'. (nd) CUL-DAR71.1-5 Transcribed and edited by Kees Rookmaaker. (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/) 1 1 Catalogue of Books (not Journals.) 1. Temminck. Hist. nat. des Pigeons et des Gallinaces. On Hybridisation Pheasants migratory instinct. 2. Royle. Illustrations of the Bot. of Himalaya. On [illeg] on wandering genera. Rev. Hope on insects. 3. Royle Productive Resources: on difference of cactus with respect to cochineal. on herding of
56%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
Devonport to Canary Islands 1831-2 December 31st In the morning very uncomfortable; got up about noon enjoyed some few moments of comparative ease.- A shoal of porpoises dashing round the vessel a stormy petrel skimming over the waves were the first objects of interest I have seen. — I spent a very pleasant afternoon lying on the sofa, either talking to the Captain or reading Humboldt glowing accounts of tropical scenery. — Nothing could be better adapted for cheering the heart of a sea-sick
56%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
St.Jago to Fernando Noronho 1832 February 6th now three weeks, what may appear very absurd it seems to me of less duration than one of its parts. — During the first week every object was new full of uncommon interest as Humboldt remarks the vividness of an impression gives it the effect of duration, — in consequence of this, those few days appeared to me a much longer interval than the whole three weeks does now. — 8th The dates for the few last days are wrong, for we certainly sailed on the
56%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
attention. The mind is a chaos of delight, out of which a world of future more quiet pleasure will arise. — I am at present fit only to read Humboldt; he like another Sun illumines everything I behold. — 29th The day has passed delightfully: delight is however a weak term for such transports of pleasure: I have been wandering by [page] 11
56%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
of those who have seen both hemispheres give the victory to the stars of the North. — It is however to me an inexpressible pleasure to behold those constellations, the first sight of which Humboldt describes with such enthusiasm. — I experience a kindred feeling when I look at the Cross of the South, the phosphorescent clouds of Magellan the great Southern Crown. — 27th, 28th During these two days the labours of the expedition have commenced. — We have laid down the soundings on parts of the
56%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
the road we passed through tracks of pasturage, much injured by the enormous conical ants nests, which in height were about 12 feet conical. — they give to the plain exactly the appearance of the Mud Volcanoes at Jorullo, figured by Humboldt. — We arrived after it was dark at Ingetado: having been 10 hours on horseback. I never ceased to wonder, from the beginning to the end of the journey, at the amount of labor which these horses are capable of enduring: I presume it is from being in a country
56%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
Collected in the neighbourhead of the house: I trust there is a change in the weather: the Hygrometer showed the air to be twice as dry in the middle of the day as in the morning. — There was a good example of what Humboldt says of the thin vapour, which without changing [page] 16
56%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
case, the fever appears to come on several days after returning into the pure atmosphere. — I could quote numbers of such cases: is it the sudden change of life, the better more stimulating food, which determines the period?- Humboldt Bonpland, after living for months in the forests, as soon as they returned to the coast, both were seized by violent fevers. — The Beagle made a very good passage up; being only 5 days, she passed a few miles inside of the Abrolhos. — A French corvette sailed 8
54%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
, in short be slaves to their Christian teachers; (V. Humboldt New Spain p 136 Vol X) likewise from a large tribe, who remained faithful at the surprisal of Osorno other Spanish towns: they were given at first the territory of Cabluco, from whence they have spread over other Islands. — Of the original Bybenies only a few families remain, chiefly in Caylen, these have lost their own dialect. The Indians yet retain their Caciques, but they scarcely have any power; when the land-surveyor or other
54%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
peopled parts of the country: they possess the immense advantage of being nearly free from trees; before leaving the forest we crossed some flat little lawns, around which single trees grew were encroaching in the manner of an English park. — It is curious how generally a plain seems hostile to the growth of trees: Humboldt found much difficulty in endeavouring with difficulty to account for their presence or absence in certain parts of S. America; it appears to me that the levelness of the
54%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
whatever cause would have unusual difficulty in breathing. The only sensation I experienced was a slight tightness over the head chest; a feeling which may be known by leaving a warm room running violently on a frosty day in England. — There was a good deal of fancy even in this, for upon finding fossil shells on the highest ridge, in my delight I entirely forgot the Puna. Certainly the labor of walking is excessive, in breathing deep difficult; it is nearly incomprehensible to me how Humboldt
49%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
after returning into the pure atmosphere. I could quote numbers of such cases: is it the sudden change of life, the better more stimulating food, which determines the period? Humboldt Bonpland,3 after living for months in the forests, as soon as they returned to the coast, both were seized by violent fevers. The Beagle made a very good passage up; being only 5 days, she passed a few miles inside of the Abrolhos. A French corvette sailed 8 days before promised our Captain to have dinner ready for him
49%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
gave Mr Douglas, the present surveyor, who was kind enough to give me the above information, eight a half square miles of forest near S. Carlos in lieu of a debt, this he sold for 350 dollars or about seventy pounds sterling. 1 These last words are substituted for 'I should suppose at least as elevated as the Peak of Teneriffe', and 'No' in the margin has been crossed out. 2 Note added in margin by CD, 'V. Humboldt New Spain p 136 Vol I', refers to Alexander von Humboldt, Political essay on
47%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
dry up, bury themselves in the mud thus like the Crocodiles mentioned by Humboldt undergo a sort [of] Hybernation or more properly Aestivation. When the rain first fell I was astonished could not explain the numbers which appeared of full size in every ditch little pool[s] which had previously been dry. [note (c) added later] June 1833. Maldonado. I accidentally kept an Ampullaria in a room for more than a month, at the end of which time there [page] 58 RIO DE JANEIRO APRIL: MAY: JUNE 183
47%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Thenca, but with larger beak, which in habits appears a true Lanius, for it is said to kill young birds. [notes end] 1 The large humming bird is listed in Zoology 3:110-12 as Trochilus Gigas Vieill., while the smaller species is Trochilus forficatus Lath. 2 See Alexander von Humboldt. Personal narrative to travels to the equinoctial regions of the new continent . . . 1799-1804 . . . translated into English by Henrietta Maria Williams. 7 vols. London, 1814-29. 3 See Frederick William Beechey
47%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
tions most excellent, and gave me most lively pleasure in reading them Susan read the Journal aloud to Papa, who was interested, and liked it very much. They want to see it at Maer, but we do not know whether you would choose that, and must wait till we hear from you, whether we may or not. It shall be kept most carefully for you. 13 On 5 July 1832 CD wrote to Catherine Darwin: 'My journal is going on better, but I find it inconvenient having sent the first first part home on account of dates
47%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
walking is excessive, in breathing deep difficult; it is nearly incomprehensible tome how Humboldt ( others subsequently) have reached 19000 ft. No doubt a residence of some months in Quito, 10000 ft high would prepare the constitution for such an exertion. Yet in Potosi, strangers, I am told, suffer for about a year. When about halfway up, we met a large party of seventy loaded mules passengers; it was a pretty sight to see the long string descending, hear the wild cries of the Muleteers; they
47%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Humboldt, Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander von (1769 1859). German naturalist and traveller. Explored South America, 1799 1804. Corresponding Member, Royal Society, 1815. Johnson, Charles Richardson. Mate on the Beagle, 1832 6. Kent, William. Assistant Surgeon on the Beagle, 1833 6. King, Philip Gidley (1817 1904). Eldest son of P. P. King. Midshipman on the Beagle, 1831 6. Left the ship in 1836 to stay with his father in Australia. Drew diagrams of the layout of the Beagle for John Murray
45%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
which CD needed no introduction from Robert Grant, and which he collected avidly in a conventional way. He also took a great interest in the habits of some of the marine and terrestrial planarians that he found, which were free-living turbellarian flatworms now placed in orders Tricladida and Polycladida. In his paper published in 184461, a number of new species were described, though in the absence of further specimens from the areas of South America where he was working, they cannot always
45%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
-shelly soil close to the beach, where the trees are not so close together: They are now (Jan 15th) in bud flower: the tubers are few small, especially in the plants in the shade, with luxuriant foliage. Yet I saw one, oval with the longest diameter two inches in length. They are very watery [continued at (a) on back of P. 315] shrink, when boiled: When raw have the smell of Potatoes of Europe: When cooked are rather insipid but not bitter or ill-tasted may be eat with impunity (V Humboldt, New
45%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Cordilleras or chains lines of mountains. In both of these ridges on the Eastern Western slope the road passes over large masses of perpetual snow. On these I noticed much of the substance called red Snow1 . The elevation as calculated from Humboldt is given in Mr Caldcleugh 's 2 travels as 12800 ft. Mr Miers3 (in his account of the passage of the Andes) mentions seeing both Red Green Snow in the [two illeg. words del.] frequented pass of Uspallata Uspallata or Las Cuevas: He states no particulars. I was
45%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
burrows the inhabitants seek for them to eat. Is any other genus amongst the Saurians Herbivorous? I cannot help suspecting that this genus, the species of which are so well adapted to their respective localities, is peculiar to this group of Isds. [note in pencil crossed through and incomplete] The Inhabitants of Tahiti had never seen or heard of (B) [in pencil] Humboldt remarks that in intertropical S. America all Lizards which inhabit dry regions are esteemed as delicacies for the table. [notes end
45%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
A similar appearance is noticed by Capt King4 on NW extremity of N. Holland. called by Capt Cooks sailor +++ sea saw dust a very good name. Hawkesworth5 Vol III, P 248. M. Peron (who will describe it) Voy. Vol II Chapt: 31. +++ Cooks 1st Voy. II Vol. Chapt VII. is described as a Conferva. 1 Identified in Plant Notes p. 216 as probably Oscillatoria erythraea. 2 See Alexander von Humboldt. Personal narrative of travels to the equinoctial regions of the new continent . . . 1799-1804
45%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
for me of a proper length has flown away very pleasantly. It is |99| now three weeks, what may appear very absurd it seems to me of less duration than one of its parts. During the first week every object was new full of uncommon interest as Humboldt remarks the vividness of an impression gives it the effect of duration. in consequence of this, those few days appeared to me a much longer interval than the whole three weeks does now. 8th The dates for the few last days are wrong, for we certainly
45%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
gaudy butter-fly, it is arrested by some strange tree or fruit; if watching an insect one forgets it in the stranger flower it is crawling over. if turning to admire the splendour of the scenery, the individual character of the foreground fixes the attention. The mind is a chaos of delight, out of which a world of future more quiet pleasure will arise. I am at present fit only to read Humboldt; he like another Sun illumines everything I behold. 1 Presumably John Martin, historical and landscape
45%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
sight of which Humboldt describes with such enthusiasm. I experience a kindred feeling when I look at the Cross of the South, the phosphorescent clouds of Magellan the great Southern Crown. 27th, 28th During these two days the labours of the expedition have commenced. We have laid down the soundings on parts of the Abrolhos, which were left undone by Baron Roussin. The depth varied to an unusual extent: at one cast of the lead there would be 20 fathoms in a few minutes only 5. The scene being
45%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
parasites invariably this strikes me as the most novel object in a Tropical forest. On the road we passed through tracks of pasturage, much injured by the enormous conical ants nests, which in height were about 12 feet. they give to the plain exactly the appearance of the Mud Volcanoes at Jorullo, figured by Humboldt. We arrived after it was dark at Ingetado: having been 10 hours on horseback. I never ceased to wonder, from the beginning to the end of the journey, at the amount of labor which these
45%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
beheld before. If it may be so compared, it is like one of the gayest scenes in the Opera House or Theatre. 2nd Collected in the neighbourhead of the house: I trust there is a change in the weather: the Hygrometer showed the air to be twice as dry in the middle of the day as in the morning. There was a good example of what Humboldt says of the thin vapour, which without changing |168| the transparency of the air, renders its tints more harmonious, softens the effects c c. In one of these days
45%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
from trees; before leaving the forest we crossed some flat little lawns, around which single trees were encroaching in the manner of an English park. It is curious how generally a plain seems hostile to the growth of trees: Humboldt found much difficulty in endeavouring to account for their presence or absence in certain parts of S. America; it appears to me that the levelness of the surface very frequently determines this point; but the cause why it should do so I cannot guess. In the case of
45%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
frame of mind I was in. But I find I am writing most precious nonsense. Two or three of our labourers yesterday immediately set to work, and got most excessively drunk in honour of the arrival of Master Charles. Who then shall gainsay if Master Charles himself chooses to make himself a fool. Good bye God bless you I hope you are as happy, but much wiser than your most sincere but unworthy Philos. Chas. Darwin.' 18th Sailed for the Thames, calling on her way at Portsmouth Deal, got up the river to
45%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
130 Ilha da Raza 80 Illapel 327 Imperial 289 India 450, 423 Ingetado 55 Iquique xiv, 315, 344 6 Isla Espa ola, see Hood Island Isla Fernandina, see Narborough Island Isla Florena, see Charles Island Isla Isabela, see Albemarle Island Isla Pinta, see Abingdon Island Isla San Cristobal, see Chatham Island Isla Santiago, see James Island Ithacaia 53 Jajuel mines 255, 257 James Island 356 Java 416 Jemmy Button, see Button, Jemmy Jenkins, Mr 7 Jenyns, Leonard xii Johnson, Charles 60, 84, 108, 207
43%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Falkner, T. 184, 396 Fernando de Noronha Island 25, 55, 252, 324, 372 3 Finet, Yves 291 Firth of Forth xi, 75, 100 FitzRoy, Captain Robert ix, xxxii, 10, 33, 127,135, 149, 212, 215, 231, 278, 285, 297 8, 361, 367, 415 Flinders, Matthew 32, 34 Forbes, Edward 8 Fox, William Darwin ix, xx, xxvi Fr zier, A.F. 183 Fuegians xix, 128, 131, 135, 215, 389 Fuller, Harry 236, 298, 300, 390, 392 Galapagos Islands xv, xix, xxi iv, 16, 285, 291 3, 360 3, 391, 412 17 Gambia 8 Gay, Claude 28, 252 Geological
55%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
reminders of his needs at the shops. My collection of the birds and quadrupeds of this place is becoming very perfect , he wrote in the Diary. A few Reales has enlisted all the boys in the town in my service, and few days pass in which they do not bring me some curious creature. The notes tell us what books he took from his store for these peaceful weeks ( Humboldt of course ); some of the bird-notes were jotted down in field excursions, and show how song and posture were closely observed
50%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
and see whether the following papers are in it; three by Humboldt on Isothermal Lines : two by Coldstream and Fioggo on Meteorology ; one by Leslie on Meteorological Observations ; Tell Edward to get all Shre. bills; to order three jointed hoops for catching beetles like my former ones only rather stronger, all to fit into one. [Erased in original.] I should be obliged if my Father would place to my account here 100 if at present convenient ditto at London what Bank? I am afraid there will be
48%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
, glorious pleasure of walking amongst such flowers and such trees, cannot be comprehended but by those who have experienced it. Although in so Low a Latitude the weather is not disagreeably hot, but at present it is very damp, for it is the rainy season. I find the climate as yet agrees admirably with me. It makes one long to live quietly for some time in such a country. If you really want to have a notion of tropical countries, study Humboldt. Skip the scientific parts, and commence after
48%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
parts of the world, you may be a long time without hearing from [me]. A year might by accident thus pass. About the 12th we start for Rio, but remain some time on the way in sounding the Albrolhos shoals. Tell Eyton as far as my experience goes, let him study Spanish, French, Drawing, and Humboldt. I do sincerely hope to hear of (if not to see him) in S. America. I look forward to the letters in Rio. Till each one is acknowledged, mention it's date in the next. We have beat all the ships in m
48%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
short time at Monte Video, we cruize to the South, but not I believe below Rio Negro. The geography of the country is as little known as interior of Africa. I long to put my foot where man has never trod before, and am most impatient to leave civilized ports. We are all very anxious about reform: the last news brought intelligence that Lord Grey would perhaps re-continue in. Would ask Erasmus to add to the books; Pennants quadrupeds, (if not too late), in my bedroom, and Humboldt, Tableaux de la
48%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
dear Katty: your most affectionately, Chas. Darwin. P.S. When you read this, I am afraid you will think that I am like the Midshipman in Persuasion, who never wrote home, excepting when he wanted to beg; it is chiefly for more books, those most valuable of all valuable things: Fleming's philosophy of Zoology , and Pennant's Quadrupeds ; these I have at home: Davy's consolation on Travel ; Scoresby, Arctic regions : Playfair Hutton, Theory of the earth : Burchel's travells : Paul Scroope on
47%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Sound, 130, 133, 135 6 King, Captain Philip Parker, Commander of first voyage, became Rear Admiral and retired to N. South Wales, 49, 127, 132, 147 King, Philip Gidley, Midshipman on H.M.S. Beagle, son of above, 54, 65 L'Aigle Rock, 222 Las Vacas, 214 Lima, 113, 115, 120, 122 3, 125, 243 5 Limerian ladies, 242, 244 Lisbon, 243 Litchfield, Mrs., author of Emma Darwin, daughter of Charles and Emma, 4, 6 Lumb, Mr., 206 Luxan, 207, 236 Lyell, Charles, 148, 243 4, 258 , Principles of Geology, 224 Macae
46%
F2114    Periodical contribution:     Porter, Duncan M. 1999. Charles Darwin's Chilean plant collections. Revista Chilena de Historia Natural 72: 181-200.   Text
. Humboldt refers to Humboldt (1822) and Sabine to Sabine (1824). Darwin made the following entry into one of the Specimens in Spirits of Wine Notebooks: 1142 Potatoes, (wild). Lowes Harbour Chonos A. (Porter 1987 p. 229; as S. tuberosum var. vulgare Hook. f.). Unknown. 984. Scurvy grass (very good) growing near the wigwams . Plant Notes. (Porter 1987 p. 167). I had earlier tentatively identified this collection as Oxalis enneaphylla Cav. (Oxalidaceae), which is known as scurvy-grass in the Falkland
    Page 1 of 10. Go to page:     NEXT