Show results per page.
Search Help New search
Sort by
Results 1-100 of 354 for « +text:ascension +(language:English) +(+name:darwin +name:charles +name:robert) »
    Page 1 of 4. Go to page:     NEXT
42%
CUL-DAR91.71    Note:    [Undated]   List of Books bearing on number of inhabitants of small area   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. [nd]. 'List of Books bearing on number of inhabitants of small area'. CUL-DAR91.71 [page] 1 List of Books bearing on number of inhabitants of small area Flora Thanatensis (includes Ramsgate) Flora Hertfordiensis (referred to by H.C. Watson) Sebastiani Colisea Flora R. Brown Chloris Molinilliana in Pary's Voyage Is there a Flora of Shepsey? { Ascension: Norfolk Isd; Tristan d'Acunha in Linn: Soc vol XII.: but in these cases there is no free access. Most of these used by Decandolle
41%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
Ascension 1836 July 19th will be able at once to picture to themselves the aspect of Ascension. They will imagine smooth conical hills of a bright red colour, with their summits generally truncated, rising distinct out of a level surface of black horrid lava. — A principal mound in the centre of the Island seems the father of the lesser cones. It is called Green Hill, its name is taken from the faintest tinge of that colour, which at this time was barely perceptible from the anchorage. To
39%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
Ascension 1836 [In the margin there are encircled numbers, 25 once and 26 once] July 20th thirsty passer by can drink some good water. Similar care is displayed in each part of the establishment, especially in the management of the Springs, so that a single drop of water shall not be lost. Indeed the whole Isld may be compared to [a] huge Ship kept in first rate order. I could not help, when admiring the active industry which has created such effects out of such means, at the same time
37%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
so much enjoyed my rambles amongst the rocks mountains, that I almost felt sorry on the morning of the 14th, to descend to the town. — Before noon I was on board, the Beagle made sail for Ascension. — 19th Reached the anchorage in the afternoon, received some letters. This alone with such a surrounding scene, was capable of producing pleasant sensations. Those who have beheld a volcanic Island, situated within an arid climate, [page] 74
36%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
places. [note opposite] These insects products of two whole days sweeping. After winter rainy season. Beginning of August. [see Insect Notes p. 103] 1836. 3861: I 62: 63: 64. Insects. Bahia 3865: I 66: 67. Insects. Ascension 3882 S Balanus, growing in clusters on the points of sandstone on the reef at Pernambuco 3900 B X Bird from summit of barren arid mountain of Ascension [note opposite] Female [page] 421 Specimens not in spirit
36%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
3901 A Rat, in great numbers inhabiting the high central part of mountain of Ascension, separated from coast by broad, perfectly arid waste of lava: was found here when island first settled. live in burrows. feed in the day.; are all black glossy fur. Ascension [listed as Mus (Rattus var.? insularis) in Zoology 2:35-7] 3902 A Rat killed near the houses at the beach, at a spot where the turtle are killed. [another variety of Mus Rattus] 3903 A X : 3904. Mice, appear to be abori= [cont. opposite
36%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
Ascencion 1836 [In the margin there are encircled numbers, 26 once and 27 once] July 20th very far inferior to St Helena. Mr Dring tells me that the witty people of the latter place say We know we live on a rock, but the poor people at Ascension live on a cinder : the distinction is in truth very just. 21st 22nd On the two succeeding days I took long walks examined some rather curious points in the mineralogical composition of some of the Volcanic rocks, to which I was guided by the kindness
36%
EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
Ascension to Bahia 1836 [In the margin there are encircled numbers, 27 once and 28 once] July 22nd broken lava rocks. — The ocean is a raging monster, insult him a thousand miles distant, his great carcase is stirred with anger through half an hemisphere. — 23rd In the afternoon put to sea. — When in the offing, the Ships head was directed in W. S.W. course — a sore discomfiture surprise to those on board who were most anxious to reach England. I did not think again to see the coast of S
34%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
parts. 14th I so much enjoyed my rambles amongst the rocks mountains, that I almost felt sorry on the morning of the 14th, to descend to the town. Before noon I was on board, the Beagle made sail for Ascension. 19th Reached the anchorage in the afternoon, received some letters. This alone with such a surrounding scene, was capable of producing pleasant sensations. Those who have beheld a volcanic Island, situated within an arid climate, |747| will be able at once to picture to themselves the aspect
32%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
would ever have thought of making the Isd of Ascension a productive spot; any other people would have held it, without any further views, as a mere fortress in the ocean. Near the coast, nothing grows, a little inland, an occasional green Castor oil plant a few grasshoppers, true friends of the desert, may be met with. On the central elevated parts, some grass is scattered over the surface, much resembling the worse parts of the Welsh mountains. But scanty as it appears, about six hundred
31%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
1462 Nereidous animal: Ascension [note opposite] Case (3818) consists of nearly parallel tubes of cemented particles of shells: Mouth one side always highest forming sort of hood. Is said to produce large masses within short space of week. 1463 2 species of Corallina: Bahia Brazil. One inarticulata with corals V 3671464 Halimeda. Bahia. tidal pools. at extremities of branches coarse vascular structure. 1836 1465 P Flower leaves of a low shrubby tree growing on the hills: flower singular dirty
31%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Darwin, Erasmus Alvey (1804 81). CD's elder brother. Studied science and medicine at Cambridge and Edinburgh, but never practised. Darwin, Robert Waring (1766 1848). CD's father. Third son of Erasmus Darwin by his second wife. Physician with a large practice in Shrewsbury. Resided at The Mount, Shrewsbury, which he built c. 1796 8. Married Susannah, daughter of Josiah Wedgwood I, in 1796. FRS 1788. Darwin, Susan Elizabeth (1803 66). CD's sister, called by him Granny. Did not marry. Davies
31%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Hill 109, 174 Ancud, see San Carlos Angra 437 Anna pink 277 8 Anson, George 66, 277 8, 448 Antuco volcano 299 Araucanian Indians 164, 284, 288 90, 293 Arauco 289, 344 Archer, Mr 401, 448 Areco 191 Arequipa 345 Arica 344 Arqueros mines 332 3 Ascension Island 431 2 Aston, Mr 61 2, 75, 79, 448 Atacama Desert 339 Athenaeum 5 6 Australia 395 413, 428 Bahia (Salvador) 40 6, 61, 65, 72, 80, 432 4 Baia (Bahia) Blanca 99 110, 119, 150, 163, 166, 172 3, 178, 186, 208, 314 Baker, Mr 383, 385, 448 Baker, Sir
29%
F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Beagle Record pp. 359 62. 2 As pointed out by Sulloway (1983), this is the first occasion in the Diary on which CD definitely abandoned the spelling 'broard'. [page] 431 ASCENSION JULY 183
28%
F1840    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2000. Charles Darwin's zoology notes & specimen lists from H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Falkner, T. 184, 396 Fernando de Noronha Island 25, 55, 252, 324, 372 3 Finet, Yves 291 Firth of Forth xi, 75, 100 FitzRoy, Captain Robert ix, xxxii, 10, 33, 127,135, 149, 212, 215, 231, 278, 285, 297 8, 361, 367, 415 Flinders, Matthew 32, 34 Forbes, Edward 8 Fox, William Darwin ix, xx, xxvi Fr zier, A.F. 183 Fuegians xix, 128, 131, 135, 215, 389 Fuller, Harry 236, 298, 300, 390, 392 Galapagos Islands xv, xix, xxi iv, 16, 285, 291 3, 360 3, 391, 412 17 Gambia 8 Gay, Claude 28, 252 Geological
40%
CUL-DAR29.1.A1-A49    Note:    1832.00.00--1833.00.00   [Beagle animal notes] (see also individual entries below)   Text   Image
Keeling Rat (3591) [listed as 3590] (N.B. All rats of same appear diseased. same from top of mountain same) differs from common rat in being smaller brighter colour, rather yellower, no other difference, perhaps tail rather longer — belly instead of being white is yellowish. Mr Waterhouse cannot make up his mind. Ascension 3901. Mus niger, ordinary fur longer than Europaean. Considerably softer, long silky hairs not so long, numerous or stiff. No whitish hairs, proportions different, rather
39%
CUL-DAR29.1.A1-A49    Note:    1832.00.00--1833.00.00   [Beagle animal notes] (see also individual entries below)   Text   Image
Animals 3901 Rat, in great numbers inhabiting the high central part of the mountain of Ascension, separated from the coast by a broad, perfectly arid waste of lava. Was found here when the island was first settled. They live in burrows, often are seen feeding by day; all are black have glossy fur. [listed as Mus (Rattus var.? insularis) in Mammalia: 35-37] 3902 Rat killed near the houses at the beach at a spot where the turtle are killed. What species is it? [another variety of Mus Rattus
37%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
[?] Pidgeons: how many generations old on an average Vertebra of Indian cattle Eyton dissect skeletons Pidgeons. The final note-book, like the last, is a medley of varying date and content. A few entries on the islands of Ascension and St. Helena, and quotations from talks with Sir A. Smith and Sir J. Herschel, both of whom he met at the Cape of Good Hope, fix the period at any rate for most of the entries as written during the last months of the voyage. Ascension, vegetation? Rats and Mice: at St. Helena
33%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
: does not explain cleavage lines. Still he brings any new detailed observation to bear on the older riddles. Each stage of the voyage helps to fill in the whole picture. I feel no doubt respecting the brecciated white stone of Chiloe, after having examined the changes of pumice at Ascension The hypothesis had to wait eighteen months for confirmation. He is exercised over the oscillations of the Surface of the Globe and the viscid nucleus beneath. He wants to experiment: Try on globe, with slip
33%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
range. Now he must generalise from all this accumulation of fact. Go steadily through all the limits of birds and animals in S. America. Zorilla; wide limit of waders; Ascension: Keeling: At sea so commonly seen at long distances: New Zealand rats offering in the history of rats, in the Antipodes a parallel case. Speculate on neutral ground for 2 Ostriches: bigger one encroaches on smaller; change not progressive; produced at one blow, if one species altered. Mem: my idea of Volcanic islands
32%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
My dear old Granny, your affectionate brother, Charles Darwin. Give my love also to Nancy. LETTER NO. 30 [Not previously published] [To Miss Caroline Darwin] BAY OF ISLANDS. NEW ZEALAND. December 27th, 1835 My dear Caroline, My last letter was written from the Galapagos, since which time I have had no opportunity for sending another. A Whaling Ship is now going direct to London, I gladly take the chance of a fine rainy Sunday evening of telling you how we are getting on. You will see we have
32%
F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
himself and his wife Emma Wedgwood. The notes ring sadly today, when few of these walls are left standing. Certainly 12 Upper Gower Street, the house finally selected, where he lived for the first years of his married life, is gone, though the jagged wall with the plaque commemorating the fact that Charles Darwin lived here, remained as a ruin for months before final demolition. Mr. Fuller, 8 Albany Place, Regents Park 200 Albany St. 70 per annum No: 161 100 premium. Another further up this street
37%
CUL-DAR35.206-217    Note:    1834.07.00   Geological diary: ChiloĆ©   Text   Image
Lyell Vol I (1st Edit) p 3464 talks of lava being like clay I feel no doubt about brecciated white stone at Chiloe. after seeing the process of change in pumice of Ascension RN5 Chiloe stratification RN p. 87 1 Robert Jameson (1774-1854), Scottish naturalist and mineralogist who taught Darwin at Edinburgh University. See the Buenos Ayres notebook p. 14a, note 1. 2 Aubuisson de Voisins 1819. 3 Marsden 1811. The edition Darwin cited here is unclear. See South America p. 135 and the Edinburgh
39%
A644    Periodical contribution:     Anon. 1836-7. [Reports of Darwin's communications read to the Cambridge Philosophical Society 1835-7]. The London and Edinburgh philosophical magazine and journal of science 8, no. 43 (January 1836): 79, 80; 10, no. 61 (April 1837): 316.   Text
Ascension; a white hard calcereous rock formed rapidly at Ascension; a recent calcereous formation indurated by the contact of lava at St. Jago, one of the Cape de Verde islands.1 1 The minutes of the General Meeting of the Cambridge Philosophical Society on 27 February 1837 record: 'An account by Mr C. Darwin of fused sand tubes found near the Rio Plata, which were exhibited along with several other specimens of rocks.' Details are provided in this press report that are not given in the minutes
53%
CUL-DAR37.716-795A    Note:    1835.10.00   Geological diary: Galapagos Islands [All images collated into a single sequence, together with transcription]   Text   Image
NB The trade wind has affected the forms of the craters at Ascension must in a like manner have produced an original weekness on one side in these cases. — page in pencil. 791 (42) rect
45%
CUL-DAR37.716-795A    Note:    1835.10.00   Geological diary: Galapagos Islands [All images collated into a single sequence, together with transcription]   Text   Image
[Notes to 778 (32) recto] (a) It is true such might be produced to a certain extent by the Mud carried by the Rain flowing down the hill sides. — It may be doubted how if the stratified appearance structure would be produced. — Yes it perfectly is as seen in the Isd of Ascension: The whole question must be considered with case, but the hollow channels afford a heavy argument in favor of mud eruptions. — Yes it...eruptions. —] added pencil. 779 (33) rect
38%
CUL-DAR37.716-795A    Note:    1835.10.00   Geological diary: Galapagos Islands [All images collated into a single sequence, together with transcription]   Text   Image
. 55 Darwin wrote: 'Strong currents off the Galapagos. — strata must be accumulating which like the secondary strata of England, besides ordinary marine remains may contain shells few corals Tortoise remains of Amphibia, exclusively. Turtle bones. the bones of two graniniverous a herbivorous lizard. — from the action of torrents. marine Tortoise other species of large lizard. — There would probably be no other organic remains.-' 9 On Red notebook p. 72 Darwin wrote: 'Pisolitic balls occur in the
41%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. Geological diary: Ascension. (7.1836) CUL-DAR38.936-953 Transcribed by Guido Chiesura. (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/). 936 (1 Ascension During our short visit of three days I chiefly confined my attention to some singular facts  respecting the mineralogical nature of some of the certain rocks, thus was not able to understand but very little of the general structure of the Isld. — There [are] most important references in D'Aubuisson on scoriae in Thonolite on
41%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
(31 calcareous incrustation appears, on the lava rocks of the beach, near the settlement. The incrustation is hard, white, resembling the nature of the thick shells of molluscous animals is composed of successive thin layers. It appears gradually disappears in the same manner, within the time specified [ie] it varies now only coats the tidal rock from close to the settlement in no other part of this Isld; — it varies in quantity in the different years. — marble 2.71 2.63 Ascension specimen In
39%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
[The page has a vertical crease which Darwin has used as a separator so that the right hand quarter of the page has separate text from the left hand. Gordon Chancellor.] [Left hand text] April 29th 1835 nothing Description of Mr Hennahs specimens from Ascension. Geolog. Proceedings. Ed. Phil Joun. Jan 1830 account of Ascension In Coll of Surgeons. A [calculus] from animals stomach. nucleus a nail. The form from it has gone in exaggerating to a remarkable degree which is quite point in case to
37%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
(9 Ascension on a much grander scale are less obvious. — The great stratified mass appeared to have been tilted into a nearly vertical position: fissures transverse the rocks, some of which are filled up with decomposing Volcanic fragments, others remain open, appear to be of great depth. — These latter must have originated posteriorly to all marked changes in the nature of the surface of the Isld. From I was unable (perhaps from limited time), with the exception of the riding school, to trace
37%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
(13 Ascension [sketch in margin] two or three places, where the cliffs are not steep, these horizontal strata slope inward less grow thinner; which latter circumstance must be the natural consequence of the greater extent of surface in proportion to the falling matter, likewise to a greater facility in its degradation. — From this fact, we must conclude, that the flat bottom of the Cricket ground has a thickness of such strata, at least equal to that of the surrounding country. — probably much
37%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
(17 Ascension more then one person. Sometimes the veins although so thin project upwards although two or three feet extend in length for a few yards. They are, in such cases, both to extremely sonorous, emitting, when struck, a sound like a big drum; likewise elastic, this last rare phenomenon not however being perceptible in hard specimens. The whole surface of the hill is thickly strewed with fragments, hence in walking over them, a noise is produced as from the basaltic clinkers in the
37%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
(21 Ascension convolutions around small carious hollows. such fine laminae The weathered surface wonderful Moreover we have another rock intimately associated with the above; it is hard compact is composed of excessively fine alternations. of a blueish grey pale brown crystalline felspathic stone, containing a few cryst. of glassy felspar numerous minute linear-shaped black (iron ?) particles 3810 3814 loose fragment. Phonolite? Trachyte? is ours In the neighbourhead there were so many loose
37%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
25 Ascension Parts of the same mass contained angular patches of true red jasper 3782 poor specimen: it was, at the time, the impression on my mind, that the presence of the jasper was someway owing to the siliceous ferruginous infiltrations. Moreover Besides the [red], in the close neighbourhead, within the same lava, there are extensive masses of regular ochre yellow jasper. 3782 Like saucer within saucers of different colours Within The saucer-shaped summit, the marginal inferior strata dip
37%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
(29 Ascension Recapitulate volcanic formation There are a few facts, respecting some formations of the present day, which are worthy of being described. — In several parts of the Island there are occur extensive white beaches, composed rounded of calcareous particles. of Near to the settlement where the superficial sand shifts, the lower part is found cemented into a firm stone. This calcareous sandstone is composed of small well rounded fragmen grains, resulting from comminuted shells, corals
37%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
(33 Ascension their surfaces are tolerably even,  polished to such a degree so as to be glassy, like the most beautiful species of the genus Oliva. — I have occasionally seen the form simply botryoidal, but fissured; in such cases, where the colour was black, a considerable resemblance to      blistered manganese was apparent. — I do not think, any one would readily at first credit it was a calcareous stone. — These glossy fronds incrust all the points of scoriaceous compact basalts, which
37%
CUL-DAR38.957-960    Note:    1836.00.00   Geological diary: Terceira (Azores)   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. Geological diary: Terceira (Azores). (9.1836) CUL-DAR38.957-960 Transcribed by Kees Rookmaaker (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/) 957 1836 Terceira Azores The Island of Terceira appears to consist of an elevated central part, which slopes down on all sides to the sea. — Both on the flanks and on the summit, there are scattered numerous volcanic cones, which yet partially retain their crateriform summits. — The streams of lava, which have proceeded from them can in some
36%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
(5 Ascension The imperfect forms of these incrustations, seem to show a contraction, partial removal of some substance. — Do they owe their origin to the indissoluble parts of the birds dungs, washed clean by the rain then hardened? What is their composition? Do they resemble the arborescent masses out on the rocks of the Abrolhos? — Chronology of degradation. perhaps From the arid nature of the climate, it is probable that, with the exception of the surface growing, a little dull, the lava
36%
CUL-DAR38.936-953    Note:    [1836.00.00]   Geological diary: Ascension   Text   Image
original inequality owing to caused by the action of the trade wind on the ashes of lighter ejected matter. — Mr. Hennah Geolog. Proceedings 1835, p. 189 beds of ashes at Ascension always occur on the leeward side of the island. — Some of the craters have cast forth the bodies called Volcanic bombs; in the vicinity of one, which probably was the source of the extremely rugged lava stream in the SW. extremity of the Isd. many of these rounded shapes were lie strewed on the ground. they vary in
33%
F1577    Periodical contribution:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1963. Darwin's ornithological notes. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 2 (7): 201-278. With introduction, notes and appendix by the editor.   Text   Image   PDF
last of the small pocketbooks Darwin carried with him for immediate notes on the voyage, in which at any rate some of the entries date from the last lap home, though others may be of later date. There are notes on the islands of Ascension and St. Helena, and quotations from conversations with Sir A. Smith and Sir J. Herschel, both of whom he met at the Cape of Good Hope. In this pocket-book he writes: Ascension, vegetation? Rats and Mice: at St. Helena there is a native Mouse. Here the idea
30%
F1577    Periodical contribution:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1963. Darwin's ornithological notes. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 2 (7): 201-278. With introduction, notes and appendix by the editor.   Text   Image   PDF
wing, either when soaring in flocks at a stupendous height, or as showing their most perfect skill in evolutions, when many are darting at the same floating morcel. If the piece of meat sink above six inches beneath the surface, it is lost to the Frigate Bird [Point of insertion of deleted addition (b) on separate page, and end of second deletion.] (b) at Ascension this bird is said to destroy great numbers of the young [tortoise del.] turtle, as they come out of the eggs run down to the sea
58%
EH1.3    Note:    1836.01.00--1836.04.00   'Sydney Mauritius' (1-4.1836). Beagle field notebook   Text
Limestone hills, from Lots wife to the sea Account of Ascension Salt Gypsum incrustations Limestone — Fernando Noronha — geology [precious nonsense], [page 63a
47%
CUL-DAR38.864-881    Note:    1836.03.00   Geological diary: King George's Sound   Text   Image
Particles of shells brown, purple black in blowpipe number of rocks counted like Ascension [Meagry] superior centered layer pure over silicen surface weathered dry climate round of changes though stalactites, not crystal as compact as any of the oldest foundation page written in pencil 87
37%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
variation?)] as in Cordillera. From poles to Equator current downwards to West. From Equator to poles. nearer the surface to the Eastward. If matter proceeds from great depth. from axis to surface must gain a Westerly current: If great changes of climate have happened. hurricane in bowels of earth cause: does not explain cleavage lines./ possibly general symetry of world. I feel no doubt. respecting the brecciated white stone of Chiloe, after having examined the changes of pumice at Ascension In Calc
37%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
graduate into granites 89 the conta passage from lava to Granite is much more perfect. than in believing mere agency of dikes: indeed when do these dikes lead to a conical mass. will this conical mass be granite? Why not more probably greenstone? What probable origin can be given to the numerous hills of greenstone? Daubeny. P 95. Glassy Stony Pearlstones alternate together in contorted layers:107 Mem: Phillips Mineralogy some such fact stated to exist in Peru.108 Ascension At Ischia there is a
35%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
clean. without earth. Moreover that such do not occur on the beaches. Perhaps these facts attest a more decided elevation of sea's bottom. beds of shells. 2-3 toises thick. Vol II. p. 252128 Urge cliff form of land, in St Helena. Ascension. Azores. ([sandstone first gives] half demolished craters). worn into mud dust. connection with age, agreement with number of craters. No cliffs at Ascension (or modern streams of St Jgo) yet no historical records of eruptions how immense the time!! How well
35%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
Subject index to the Red Notebook Page references are to the original notebook Adaptation of species in relation to extinction, 133-134e Algae. See Conferv Alluvial plains not always most favourable to wild animals, 86 Andes, quantity of matter from crevice of, 136e Anglesea, geological strata of, 5e-7e Animal: effects of puncturing one with dead body of another, 178; with set described by d'Orbigny, 174e Animals: preservation of, 115; at Spitzbergen, 159 Antarctic vegetation, 125 Ascension
33%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
38 refers to similar detail for St Helena, the Beagle's port from 8-14 July. Later in the notebook, on page 45, reference is made to Ascension Island which the Beagle visited from 19-23 July, and on page 77 a reminder is given to 'Mem. Ascension'. On page 94 Darwin wrote I now having seen Pernambuco which he visited from 12-17 August. Continuing this series, page 99 mentions the Cape Verde Islands, a port for the Beagle from 31 August-5 September. Finally, page 107 refers to the Azores where the
33%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
[(Yanky Edit)]59 I think At60 Ascension, the lamin changes in rocks. connected with alternating with obsidian must clearly be chemical differences. not those of rapid cooling c c My results go to believe that much of all old strata of England. formed near surface: Mem Patagonian pebbles beds, most unfavourable to preservation of bones c c Yet silicified turn over61 46e Silicified wood. Cordilleras, Chiloe. c seems the organic structure most easily preserved. Mr Conybeare introduct to Geolog Between
33%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
Plutonic rocks are generated as often as Volcanic. I consider latter as accidental on the afflux of the former. ]100 Ascension. Vegetation? Rats Mices. At St Helena there is a native mouse. 80 Did wave first retreat at Juan Fernandez: the first great movement was one of rise (any smaller prior ones might have been owing to absolute movement of ground). Michell (Philos: [page] 53 THE RED NOTEBOO
33%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
93e What is nature of strip of Mountain Limestone in N. Wales. was it reef. I remember many Corals?? Breccia Stratification? Anomalous action of ocean. at Ascension. (where occasionally most tremendous surf loose sandy beach) deposits [calcareous] encrustations; At Bahia ferruginous. At Pernambuco (great swell turbid water) organic bodies protect like peat reef of sandstone. Corals, Corallina survive, in the most violent surfs: in both latter cases become petrified, increase. In Southern
33%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
limits of birds animals in S. America. Zorilla:151 129 wide limits of Waders: Ascension. Keeling: at sea so commonly seen. at long distances; generally first arrives: New Zealand rats offering in the history of rats, in the antipodes a parallel case. Should urge that extinct Llama owed its death not to change of circumstances; reversed argument. knowing it to be a desert. 152 Tempted to believe animals created for a definite time: not extinguished by change of circumstances: 130 The same kind of
32%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
, where dikes certainly have not been points of eruption. Nobody supposes that all the dikes in Cornwall or in the coal measures have been conduits to volcanoes. 60 Talking of the cricket valley [the most remarkable feature in the structure of Ascension]76 give as an example the great subsidence at the famous eruption of Rialeja, the more true analogy from the Galapagos Mr Lyell. P. 111 113. [seems to] considers that successive terraces mark as many distinct elevations;77 hence it would appear he
32%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
: bubbles in, 159; in Cordillera and on Eastern plains by Antuco, 143e; flowing up hill, 159; freshness of at Ascension, 17; in Iceland, 90 Life at 1,000 fathoms below freezing point, 114e Limestone(s): formed in shallow water, 19e; origin of in N. Wales, 93e Llama, cause of extinction of one form of, 129 Loss of species, causes of in South America, 85 Mastodon inhabiting plains of Patagonia as Rhinoceros inhabits S. Africa, 85-86 Mauritius: main skeleton of mountains of, 118-120; volcanic cone
32%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
Geographical index to the Red Notebook Page references are to the original notebook Abrolhos shoals, 10, 16e Acapulco, 163e, 177e Africa, 64 65e, 91, 97e Aleutian Archipelago, 38e Alps, 100e Amazon River, 56e, 100e, 170e America, 18, 97e, 105e, 169e America, northwest coastline of, 15e, 45e, 97e Andes mountains, 7e, 11, 44e, 52, 64, 69, 125, 136e. See also Cordillera Anglesea (Anglesey), 5e 7e Antarctic (Antarctica), 125 Antuco, 143e Araucaria (Araucania), 178 Arequipa, 116 Ascension Island
30%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
scoring alongside the preceding sentence are in light brown ink. 74'Rapilli' was equivalent in meaning to 'lapilli'. See, for example, the use of 'rapilli' by Daubeny (Volcanos, p. 251) and Humboldt (Personal Narrative, vol. 1, p. 232). 75 This entry is in light brown ink. 76 An oval depression towards the eastern end of Ascension Island was described by the resident English marines as the cricket ground because the bottom is smooth and perfectly horizontal. See Darwin MSS, Cambridge University
30%
F1583e    Periodical contribution:     Herbert, S. ed. 1980. The red notebook of Charles Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Historical Series 7 (24 April): 1-164.   Text   Image   PDF
Hobart town compared to Tierra del Fuego, 21; in Patagonia, 86; secondary, accumulating off Galapagos, 55e; subsidence of in Chiloe, 87e Submarine tilting, 68e Subsidence: at Ascension, 60; caused by movement fluid matter, 77; indicated by silicified trees, 152, 154; at Tierra del Fuego, 140e Terraces: in Chili compared to St. Jago, 99e; preservation of in valleys, 63 Tertiary formations 20e, 36e, 47, 102 Tierra del Fuego: origin of form of land at, 140e; soundings off, 140e Time as a relation
40%
CUL-DAR40.93-96    Note:    1836.07.00   Ascension (geological descriptions)   Text   Image
flattened on part P. — yet now lying in part on hard layer must have been bed of ashes; wind removed — hence wind may cause rain in valleys of the ashes. great deposits. — Add to St Helena paper, certain fact of great cliffs, caused by degredation. Ascension Ascension] ink, written over other entries. this page is dirty as if it was the outermost of the folded packet
38%
CUL-DAR40.93-96    Note:    1836.07.00   Ascension (geological descriptions)   Text   Image
rocks — in few parts cement stained from brown with do — Generally cement glistening, coats each particles; then central parts become removed. Mem. Coquimbo? examine specimens — some laminated kinds, very hard, V. specimen. — At St Helena drift by winds harmonizes with absence of shells — Red particles have shells in coral. Harder when exported. — [sketch] shifting sand pink — peculiar colour only examined to one bodies. St. Helena Paper shells, winnowed, only difference with Ascension.— Mem
36%
CUL-DAR40.93-96    Note:    1836.07.00   Ascension (geological descriptions)   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. Ascension. [Beagle field notes] [7.1836] CUL-DAR40.93-96 Transcribed by Kees Rookmaaker (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/) 93 verso very red Hill Cross Hill; Lower part a white feldspathic Lava, in plates, on surface, not very cellular. — great irregular stream of blank lava — nature unknown — very slightly amygdoidal edge of stream 35-40 ft thick. — great valleys with numerous layer of all sizes sorted pumice pebbles. Volcanic ashes — fragment — sandstone, leaves some
38%
CUL-DAR38.920-935    Note:    [1836.00.00]1836.07.08--1836.07.13]   Geological diary: St. Helena   Text   Image
from memory, I believe much some of the sand in the Keeling Isds (Lagoon Isds) was in this state. In general aspect the sand on some of the beaches on Galapagos Islds was precisely similar. NB. At Ascension in the hard calcareous sandstone scarcely a trace of organic structure could be perceived. These beds differ from those of Ascension in greater fineness, larger proportion of volcanic dust complete absence of all large fragments of shells, all which agree with the idea of [winnowing]. The
37%
CUL-DAR38.920-935    Note:    [1836.00.00]1836.07.08--1836.07.13]   Geological diary: St. Helena   Text   Image
loose dry unconsolidated. — In the mass of earthy detritus, which partially caps the calcareous sand, there was some gypseous matter, which occurred much in the same manner, as water, which having oozed into the ground is there frozen .— Mem. Ascension. X On the side of the hill, adjoining to the quarry, many of the fr fragments of rocks were white-washed 3721: 22: 23 others thickly coated with a pale brown earthy limestone. (like tosca) — Some of the nodules were more singular, a more an
36%
CUL-DAR38.920-935    Note:    [1836.00.00]1836.07.08--1836.07.13]   Geological diary: St. Helena   Text   Image
percolating has coated surface of rocks stones. [sketch] When sloping Coast like Ascension On the sea coast I did not see any signs of  recent elevation; but the form of the land behind Prosperous Bay Flagstaff Hill, taking the S. American coast as my guide, would indicate the former residence of an former ocean. Superficial bays have been hollowed out of the upper horizontal strata within which, flat topped points stand isolated.— A structure, which it is difficult to imagine the  [sketch] 934 (2
44%
CUL-DAR32.3-8    Note:    [1836.08.00]   Geological diary: Bahia   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. Geological diary: Bahia. CUL-DAR32.3-8 Transcribed by Kees Rookmaaker (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/) 3 Bahia (1 The granitic rocks consist essentially of gneiss; of this some is coarse grained well characterized, but the 3838 greater part is highly felspathic: frequently by losing its mica quartz gaining Hornblende change colour of feldspar passes into a primitive greenstone. (Pegmatite) See specimens 3841-44 Allude to two kinds of incrustations on rocks of
37%
CUL-DAR32.9-14    Note:    [1836.08.00]   Geological diary: Bahia Brazil   Text   Image
(3 Bahia. Brazil dark grey calcareous varnish at Ascension. From this analogy Must we believe that the ferruginous matter is deposited at times when the rocks are protected by an accidental covering of sand or shingle, or merely at the intervals of low water? — I rather incline to the former of these supposition because in one spot a patch of conglomerate still adhered to one side of a burnished point. — But Again how does the mechanical action of the surf aggregate consolidate into so hard a
37%
CUL-DAR32.9-14    Note:    [1836.08.00]   Geological diary: Bahia Brazil   Text   Image
cataract. — (a In all the cases the rocks are granitic, but as such formations contain such distinct minerals as quartz. felspar. mica Hornblende. I cannot believe their composition can have produce any effect. — Probably all that is required is a solid surface not subject to rapid decomposition. There is another coincidence in the intertropical climate, which likewise is common to the calcareous varnish at Ascension (? at Serpentine at St Pauls). but it Berzelius, at the request of Humboldt 1
34%
CUL-DAR38.954-956    Note:    1836.08.00   Geological diary: Bahia Brazil   Text   Image
(3 mahogany colouring in few parts blackish — stream with patches of ferrug: sandstone conglomerate in bed. — all water is thus granitic land do = large fragment long ago broken off, perhaps for neighbouring old building, coated nearly as brightly — (see spec:), action of sea — polish resembling calc: rock at Ascension. — Mem. [moonrock] Mica when stream rapid ?? — rock in sun dry very pretty more so, than specimens show — a mere few yards in extent. = not effervesce, not stain Borax purple
47%
CUL-DAR127.-    Note:    1837.00.00--1839.00.00   Notebook A: Geology   Text   Image
[page excised, now in CUL-DAR42.116] All the Azores Isl d . Von Buch p 359 stretched out NE SW. — Von Buch. Can. Ile p. 406. List of Volcanos Salomon Isl d , — New Britain — c c In Ascension for centuries afterwards it might be percieved on which side craters were low — ؟ applicable to Auvergne??? 41
47%
CUL-DAR127.-    Note:    1837.00.00--1839.00.00   Notebook A: Geology   Text   Image
[page excised, now in CUL-DAR42.43] Phillips (113) Lardner Encyclop. — absolutely considers gneiss an aqueo deposit resulting from disintegrated granite!!! Look at gneiss of Rio Concretions in Pumice bed at Ascension instance of hollow concretions concretion filled with unconsolidated matter — 5
47%
CUL-DAR127.-    Note:    1837.00.00--1839.00.00   Notebook A: Geology   Text   Image
Any one, who has studied rocks in detail as amygdaloid. calcareous rocks of Ascension, each particle coated. c will be aware how little common Gravity has to do with arrangement of particles in rock. This applies to cleavage concretions. — Septaria in concretion arranged in planes, case of separation. — the branching cracks — only bear relations to veins in primitive rocks — 6
42%
CUL-DAR118.-    Note:    1837.00.00--1839.00.00   Notebook: Edinburgh   Text   Image
All Owens papers on Intestinal worms must be studied in Vol. I Zoolog: Transact. before writing on Planaria or polypi — is especially grand paper p. 387 on Classification of such animals. — Voyage Coquille's Voyage p. 302 Vol. II p. 302 Vaginulus of Lima described Arion of Ascension p. do Some S American Reptiles are described Shells from Tahiti and Chile The North S. Range of shells might perhaps be worked out with advantage with Cumms collection my own: Capt. Kings p. 453 Planaria vitella
26%
F1574c    Pamphlet:     de Beer, Gavin ed. 1960. Darwin's notebooks on transmutation of species. Part III. Third notebook [D] (July 15 to October 2nd 1838). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 2 (4) (July):119-150.   Text   Image   PDF
same with the philospher who has traced the structure of animals plants. He get[s] merely a few pages. Hence (p. 59) looking at animal, if there be many others somewhat allied whether like parent stock, or not, now wings for flight therefore ostrich not. The peculiar Malacca bears belong to same section with those of India. 61-64 excised. 65 man have carries the range Argue the case of probability, has Creator made rat for Ascension The Galapagos mouse probably transported like the New Zealand
25%
F1574f    Pamphlet:     de Beer, Gavin, Rowlands, M. J. and Skramovsky, [Mrs] B. M. eds. 1967. Darwin's notebooks on transmutation of species. Part VI. Pages excised by Darwin. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 3 (5) (21 March): 129-176.   Text   Image   PDF
p. do 20 Fish of Teneriffe. St. Helena Ascension most species like identical with S. America many very close. See full paper A most grave source of doubt in distinguishing which parent impresses offspring most is whether mother has had any offspring before now this is never stated. 36 Regarding the similarity of offspring to Parent same laws appear to hold good with regard to marriage of individuals varieties of same species to different species sometimes like one parent sometimes other
45%
CUL-DAR91.4-55    Note:    1838.00.00--1840.00.00   Old & useless notes about the moral sense & some metaphysical points   Text   Image
D Stewart41 on the Sublime The literal meaning of Sublimity is height, with the idea of ascension we associate something extraordinary of great power.— 2. From these other reasons we apply to God the notion of living in lofty regions 3. Infinity, eternity, darkness, power, begin associated with God, these phenomena we (feel ?) call sublime.— 4. From the association of power c c with height, we often apply the term sublime, where there is no real sublimity
40%
CUL-DAR124.-    Note:    1838.00.00--1839.00.00   Notebook E: [Transmutation of species]   Text   Image
argument real of antiquity of reasonable cosmopolite man. L'Institut1 1838 p. 338. Important account of cross of sheep Moufflon of Corsica, would not sadly against Yarrell's law. — not so much against my modification of it — Goat Moufflon will not breed — p. do — 2 Fish of Teneriffe. St. Helena Ascension most species like identical with S. America many very close. See full paper L'Institut 1838. p. 338 A most grave source of doubt in distinguishing which parent impresses offspring most is
35%
F8.5    Book:     Darwin, C. R. ed. 1838. Mammalia Part 2 no. 3 of The zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. By George R. Waterhouse. Edited and superintended by Charles Darwin. London: Smith Elder and Co.   Text   Image
. Does the summit of Ascension, an island so immensely remote from any continent, and the summit itself surrounded by a broad fringe of desert volcanic soil, possess a small quadruped, peculiar to itself ? Or, more probably, has this new species been brought, by some ship, from some unknown quarter of the world ? Or, I am again tempted to ask, as I did in the case of the Galapagos rat, has the common English species been changed, by its new habitation, into a strongly marked variety ? D. Mr. Darwin
33%
F8.5    Book:     Darwin, C. R. ed. 1838. Mammalia Part 2 no. 3 of The zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. By George R. Waterhouse. Edited and superintended by Charles Darwin. London: Smith Elder and Co.   Text   Image
, and on the sides of the body they are of a pale yellow at the apex: on the under parts the hairs are gray, tipped with dirty yellowish white: the feet are of the same deep purple-brown hue as in the specimen first described. Habitat, Ascension Island, Atlantic Ocean, (July.) These two animals not only differ in the colour of the fur, one being of a grizzled brownish colour, and the other black, but there is a considerable difference in the texture of the fur. In the black specimen, the fur is
33%
F8.5    Book:     Darwin, C. R. ed. 1838. Mammalia Part 2 no. 3 of The zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. By George R. Waterhouse. Edited and superintended by Charles Darwin. London: Smith Elder and Co.   Text   Image
5. MUS MUSCULUS. Mus Musculus, Auctorum. Of this species, there are six specimens in Mr. Darwin's collection ; two were found living in the short grass, near the summit of the Island of Ascension, where the climate is temperate. D. Two others were procured on a small, stony, and arid island, near Porto Praya, the capital of St. Jago, in the Cape de Verde Islands, climate very hot and dry. Excepting during the rainy season, which is of short duration, these little animals can never taste fresh
26%
F1582    Book contribution:     Barrett, P. H. 1974. Early writings of Charles Darwin. In Gruber, H. E., Darwin on man. A psychological study of scientific creativity; together with Darwin's early and unpublished notebooks. Transcribed and annotated by Paul H. Barrett, commentary by Howard E. Gruber. Foreword by Jean Piaget. London: Wildwood House. [Notebooks M, N, Old and useless notes, Essay on theology and natural selection, Questions for Mr. Wynn, Extracts from B-C-D-E transmutation notebooks, A Biographical Sketch of Charles Darwin's Father, Plinian Society Minutes Book]   Text
[OUN18]40 D Stewart41 on the Sublime The literal meaning of Sublimity is height, with the idea of ascension we associate something extraordinary of great power. 2. From these other reasons we apply to God the notion of living in lofty regions 3. Infinity, eternity, darkness, power, begin associated with God, these phenomena we (feel ?) call sublime. 4. From the association of power etc etc with height, we often apply the term sublime, where there is no real sublimity 5. The emotions of terror
42%
CUL-DAR123.-    Note:    1838.07.15--1838.10.02   Notebook D: [Transmutation of species]   Text   Image
man have carries the range — Argue the case of probability, has Creator made rat for Ascension — The Galapagos mouse probably transported like the New Zealand one — It should be observed with what facility mice attach themselves to man. Sept 7th. I was struck looking at the Indian cattle with Bump, together with Bison of some resemblance as if the variation in one was analogous to specific character of other species in genus . — Is there any law of this. Do any varieties of sheep evidently
40%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
and glossy, and has a pearly lustre; it is considerably harder than calcareous spar, although it can be scratched by a knife: under the blowpipe it decrepitates, slightly blackens, and emits a fetid odour. It consists of phosphate of lime, mingled with some impurities; and its origin without doubt is due to the action of the rain or spray on the bird's dung. I may here mention, that I found in some hollows in the lava rocks of Ascension considerable masses of the substance called guano, which
40%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
plane there necessarily would be either an eddy or a calm. I so much enjoyed my rambles among the rocks and mountains of St. Helena, that I felt almost sorry on the morning of the 14th to descend to the town. Before noon I was on board, and the Beagle made sail for Ascension. We reached the anchorage of the latter place on the evening of the 19th (July). Those who have beheld a volcanic island, situated within an arid climate, will be able at once to picture to themselves the aspect of Ascension
38%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
lost: indeed the whole island may be compared to a huge ship kept in first-rate order. I could not help, when admiring the active industry which had created such effects out of such means, at the same time regretting that it was wasted on so poor and trifling an end. M. Lesson has remarked with justice, that the English nation alone would have thought of making the island of Ascension a productive spot; any other people would have held it without any further views, as a mere fortress in the
38%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
Verd Islands, is abundant, and the common fowl has likewise run wild. Some cats, which were originally turned out to destroy the rats and mice, have increased so as to become a great plague. The island is entirely destitute of trees, in which, and in every other respect, it is very far inferior to St. Helena. Mr. Dring tells me, that the witty people of the latter place say, we know we live on a rock, but the poor people of Ascension live on a cinder : the distinction in truth is very just. On
37%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
Encircling and Barrier reefs General proofs of subsidence in the Pacific Theory of lagoon islands caused by subsidence of the land Pacific and Indian oceans divided into alternate areas of elevation and subsidence Points of eruption lie within the areas of elevation. 539 CHAPTER XXIII. Mauritius, beautiful appearance of Hindoos Cape of Good Hope St. Helena Geology History of changes in vegetation, probable cause of extinction of land-shells Ascension Green Hill Curious incrustations of calcareous
36%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
CHAPTER XXIII. Mauritius, beautiful appearance Hindoos Cape of Goo Hope St. Helena Geology History of changes in vegetation, probable cause of extinction of land-shells Ascension Green Hill Curious incrustations of calcareons matter on tidal rocks Bahia Brazil Splendour of tropical scenery Pernambuco Singular reef Azores Supposed crater Hints to collectors Retrospect of the most impressive parts of the voyage. MAURITIUS TO ENGLAND. APRIL 29TH. In the morning we passed round the northern
36%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
brachyptera, 457. Animal, extinct, allied to the Camelidæ, 208. Animalcula, pelagic, 16. Angra, capital of Terceira, 594. Antarctic islands, 272. Antipodes, 496. Ants of Brazil, 37. Apires, or miners, 420. Aplysia, 5. Apple-trees, 363. Aptenodytes demersa, 256. Areas of alternate movements in the Pacific and Indian oceans, 563. Armadillo-like covering of fossil animals in South America, 181. Armadilloes, habits of, 113. Arrow-head found in Pampas, 123. Ascension, 586. Australia, 515. Australian
34%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
would frequently consist of volcanic rocks. It becomes, therefore, a curious point to speculate on the changes which many of the present islands would undergo, during the lapse of the countless ages, which would be required to elevate them into snow-clad summits. If we take the case of Ascension, or St. Helena, both of which have long existed in an extinct condition, we may feel assured, before so vast a period could elapse, during the whole of which the surface would be exposed to constant wear
34%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
here. These rats have rather a different appearance from the English kind; they are smaller and much more brightly coloured. There are no true land-birds; for a snipe and a rail (Rallus phillippensis), though living entirely among the dry herbage, belong to the order of Waders. Birds of this order are said to occur on several of the low islands in the Pacific. At Ascension a rail (Porphyrio?) was shot near the summit of the mountain; and it was evidently a solitary straggler. From these
34%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
plain was mottled; I now found they were seafowl, which were sleeping in such full confidence, that even in midday a man could walk up to, and seize hold of them. These birds were the only living creatures I saw during the day. On the beach a great surf, although the breeze was light, was tumbling over the broken lava rocks. Upon leaving Ascension the ship's head was directed towards the coast of South America, and on August 1st, we anchored at Bahia or San Salvador. We staid here four days, in
34%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
Calcareous casts of branches and roots of trees at King George's Sound, 537. Calcareous incrustations on rocks of Ascension, 587. Callao, 446. Calomys bizcacha, 143. Camelidæ, fossil animal allied to, 210. Cape of Good Hope, 573. Capybara, or carpincho, 57. Caracara, or Carrancha, 64. Carcharias megalodon, 423. Cardoon, beds of, 138. Carrion hawks, 63. Casuchas, 413. Castro, Chiloe, 338. Cathartes atratus, 68. Cattle, effects of their grazing on the vegetation, 137. Cattle wild at the Falkland
34%
F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
structure of, 397. Icebergs, 280, 282, 283. Inca's bridge, 409. Incrustations, calcareous on rocks of Ascension, 587. of phosphate of lime, 8. Indians, 118. grave of, 199. of the Pampas, 84. ruins of houses of, 409, 438. of Valdivia, 366. antiquities of, in Chile, 325. decrease in numbers, 122. [page] 612 INDEX
32%
F9.2    Book:     Darwin, C. R. ed. 1839. Mammalia Part 2 of The zoology of the voyage of HMS Beagle. by George R. Waterhouse. Edited and superintended by Charles Darwin. London: Smith Elder and Co.   Text   Image   PDF
. Does the summit of Ascension, an island so immensely remote from any continent, and the summit itself surrounded by a broad fringe of desert volcanic soil, possess a small quadruped, peculiar to itself? Or, more probably, has this new species been brought, by some ship, from some unknown quarter of the world? Or, I am again tempted to ask, as I did in the case of the Galapagos rat, has the common English species been changed, by its new habitation, into a strongly marked variety? — D. Mr. Darwin
30%
F9.2    Book:     Darwin, C. R. ed. 1839. Mammalia Part 2 of The zoology of the voyage of HMS Beagle. by George R. Waterhouse. Edited and superintended by Charles Darwin. London: Smith Elder and Co.   Text   Image   PDF
, and on the sides of the body they are of a pale yellow at the apex: on the under parts the hairs are gray, tipped with dirty yellowish white: the feet are of the same deep purple-brown hue as in the specimen first described. Habitat, Ascension Island, Atlantic Ocean, (July.) These two animals not only differ in the colour of the fur, one being of a grizzled brownish colour, and the other black, but there is a considerable difference in the texture of the fur. In the black specimen, the fur is
30%
F9.2    Book:     Darwin, C. R. ed. 1839. Mammalia Part 2 of The zoology of the voyage of HMS Beagle. by George R. Waterhouse. Edited and superintended by Charles Darwin. London: Smith Elder and Co.   Text   Image   PDF
5. MUS MUSCULUS. Mus Musculus, Auctorum. Of this species, there are six specimens in Mr. Darwin's collection; two were found living in the short grass, near the summit of the Island of Ascension, where the climate is temperate. —D. Two others were procured on a small, stony, and arid island, near Porto Praya, the capital of St. Jago, in the Cape de Verde Islands,—climate very hot and dry. Excepting during the rainy season, which is of short duration, these little animals can never taste fresh
52%
CUL-DAR205.3.63    Note:    [ny].06.17   Ascension one of the most wonderful cases of introduced plants & animals   Text   Image
Darwin, C. R. Ascension one of the most wonderful cases of introduced plants animals. (17.7.1856?) Transcribed by John van Wyhe. CUL-DAR205.3.63 [1] Ascension one of the most wonderful cases of introduced plants animals Pigeons, Rabbits Fowl, Mice Cats ( Guinea fowls?), yet only 3 phanerogams according to Hooker June 17th— [1856?]1 1 See Hooker to Darwin 29 Nov. 1844 and 7 May 1856
35%
F8.15    Book:     Darwin, C. R. ed. 1841. Birds Part 3 no. 5 of The zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. by John Gould. Edited and superintended by Charles Darwin. London: Smith Elder and Co.   Text   Image
obscurè fulvo late marginatâ; genis gutture, corporeque infra flavescentibus; rostro rubro; pedibus viridescenti-flavis. Long. tot. 9 unc.; alæ, 5 1/2; caudæ, 2 1/2; tarsi, 1 7/8; rostrio, 7/8. Habitat, Ascension Island, Atlantic Ocean. (July.) This specimen was killed with a stick near the summit of the Island. It was evidently a straggler, which had not long arrived. There is no aboriginal land bird at Ascension. ORDER—PALMIPEDES. ANSER MELANOPTERUS. Eyton. Anser melanopterus, Eyton, Monog
33%
F8.15    Book:     Darwin, C. R. ed. 1841. Birds Part 3 no. 5 of The zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. by John Gould. Edited and superintended by Charles Darwin. London: Smith Elder and Co.   Text   Image
(at which time it merits the name of the Condor of the ocean), or when many together are dashing, in complicated evolutions, but with the most admirable skill, at the same floating object. They seem to scorn to take their food quietly, for between each descent they raise themselves on high, and descend again with a swift and true aim. If the object (such as offal thrown overboard) sink more than six or eight inches beneath the surface, it is lost to the Frigate bird. I was informed at Ascension
32%
F9.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. ed. 1841. Birds Part 3 of The zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. by John Gould. Edited and superintended by Charles Darwin. London: Smith Elder and Co.   Text   Image   PDF
obscurè fulvo late marginatâ; genis gutture, corporeque infra flavescentibus; rostro rubro; pedibus viridescenti-flavis. Long. tot. 9 unc.; alæ, 5 1/2; caudæ, 2 1/2; tarsi, 1 7/8; rostrio, 7/8. Habitat, Ascension Island, Atlantic Ocean. (July.) This specimen was killed with a stick near the summit of the Island. It was evidently a straggler, which had not long arrived. There is no aboriginal land bird at Ascension. ORDER—PALMIPEDES. ANSER MELANOPTERUS. Eyton. Anser melanopterus, Eyton, Monog
    Page 1 of 4. Go to page:     NEXT