RECORD: Higgins, H. H. 1881. Note on a collection of Cirripedes, made by Mr. Charles Darwin, and now in the Free Public Museum. Proceedings of the literary and philosophical society of Liverpool 35: xlv-xlvi.

REVISION HISTORY: Scanned by John van Wyhe, transcribed (single key) by AEL Data 6.2009. RN1

NOTE: Sowerby's collection was purchased by the Liverpool Free Public Museum in 1880. Unfortunately it was destroyed in the Second World War.


[page] xlv

The Rev. H. H. HIGGINS then read the following note on a collection of Cirripedes, made by Mr. Charles Darwin, and now in the Free Public Museum:—

"During my visit to London in June, 1880, on Museum

[page] xlvi

business, an opportunity was afforded me by Mr. Sowerby for the purchase of a large box containing a collection of Balanidæ and Lepadidæ. The specimens, which were without names, were wrapped in paper, and did not appear to have been unpacked for a considerable time. They had been in the possession of the late Mr. Taylor, whose conchological museum in the neighbourhood of Norwich is well known to have been very rich. In the course of unpacking the correction in the Liverpool Museum, the extraordinary number of little known forms, and their close agreement with the species described and figured in the monograph on the Cirripedia by Mr. Charles Darwin, Ray Society, 1854, convinced me that the collection must have been formed by Mr. Darwin himself. Accordingly, I wrote to him, and, in reply, received through his kindness a letter written by himself, which I now produce. Mr. Darwin states that, after having supplied the British Museum with a full series of all his species, having no further need of his duplicates, he parted with them to the late Mr. Sowerby, of London. Mr. Darwin very kindly expresses himself gratified that the collection should now be where it is appreciated. Evidence is wanting that the late Mr. Sowerby sold by collection to Mr. Taylor, but many similar transactions are known to have passed between them. The specimens are so numerous, and the correspondence so remarkable, that the internal evidence was quite satisfactory to myself before entering upon the enquiry. I have great pleasure in placing this interesting series of specimens before you: they are not considered suitable for constant public exhibition, but may be seen at the Museum by application to Mr. Moore, the curator. Many of the Balani are on corals, and might afford materials for the further illustration of Professor Semper's observations on the galls of corals."

The following communication was then read:—

[title page]

PROCEEDINGS OF THE LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY OF LIVERPOOL, DURING THE SEVENTIETH SESSION, 1880-81.

No. XXXV.

LONDON:

LONGMANS, GREEN, READER & DYER.

LIVERPOOL:

D. MARPLES & CO. LIMITED, LORD STREET.

1881.


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Citation: John van Wyhe, editor. 2002-. The Complete Work of Charles Darwin Online. (http://darwin-online.org.uk/)

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