RECORD: Wollaston, T. V. 1857. Catalogue of the coleopterous insects of Madeira in the collection of the British Museum. London: Trustees of the British Museum.

REVISION HISTORY: Transcribed (single key) by AEL Data, corrections by John van Wyhe 8.2009. RN1


[page 1]

CATALOGUE

OF THE

COLEOPTEROUS INSECTS

OF

MADEIRA

IN

THE COLLECTION

OF THE

BRITISH MUSEUM.

BY
T. VERNON WOLLASTON, M.A., F.L.S.

LONDON:
PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES.

1857.

[page] 81

219. Trox scaber**.

Silpa scabra, Linn., Syst. Nat. i. ii. 573 (1767).

Trox arenarius, Gyll., Ins. Suec. i. 11 (1808).

— scaber, Heer, Fna Col. Helv. i. 533 (1841).

— —, Woll., Ins. Mad. 233 (1854).

Inhabits Madeira proper, and is hitherto unique,—the single specimen (now in the British Museum, and which may perhaps have been imported into the island) having been captured by the late Dr. Heineken.

Fam. 23. GLAPHYRIDÆ.

Genus 89. CHASMATOPTERUS.

(Dejean, Cat.) Latreille, Reg. An. iv. 567 (1829).

220. Chasmatopterus nigrocinctus*,

Chasmatopterus nigrocintus, Woll., Ins. Mad. 236 (1854).

Inhabits Madeira proper, and, like the last species, is unique,—it being, also, from the collection of Dr. Heineken.

SECTIO VI. PRIOCERATA.

Fam. 24. BUPRESTIDÆ.

Genus 90. AGRILUS.

(Megerle) Steph., Ill. Brit. Ent. iii. 239 (1830).

The detection of a single specimen of an Agrilus in these islands, since the publication of the Insecta Maderensia, has introduced a new family into our Catalogue,—the Buprestidœ: and without entering here into the characteristics of that group, which contains some of the most gorgeous, brilliantly coloured members of the Coleoptera, approaching in outline and structure to the Elateridœ (though with their hinder prothoracic angles only slightly or not at all produced), but which do not possess, when placed upon their backs, the power of springing; we may state that the Agrili are mainly distinguished from their allies by their usually narrow and subcylindrical bodies, by their scutellum being broad (and raised) at its base and abruptly acuminated at its apex, by their prosternum being largely developed in front (so as almost to conceal the mentum), and by their tarsi being rather long,—with the first joint of the hinder ones more elongated than is the case in the Buprestidœ generally.

G

[page] 82

221. Agrilus Darwinii, n. sp.

A. subcylindrico-elongatus angustus viridi-splendens ubique densissime rugulosus, prothorace versus angulos posticos unicostato, elytris apicem versus valde attenuatis dehiscentibus, antennis pedibusque paulo obscurioribus.

Long. corp. lin. 4½.

A. subcylindrical-elongate, narrow, slightly shining, of a clear metallic green (with a slightly golden tinge), and densely wrinkled (or rugulose) all over. Head much flattened in front, and longitudinally strigulose behind. Prothorax rather wider in front than behind; its posterior margin (and therefore the anterior one of the elytra, which is closely applied to it) of a zigzag, or biangulated, form; very uneven, and with a broad interrupted dorsal channel; more or less transversely strigulose; and furnished towards each of its hinder angles with a short, and somewhat curved, costa. Scutellum with its front (elevated) portion less rugulose than the rest of the surface. Elytra rather pinched-in a little before the middle, and each of them much attenuated towards their apex, where they are slightly divergent; beset with very minute posteriorly-directed points behind; deeply pitted on either side at the base (between the scutellum and either humeral angle), and with the rudiments of a small tubercle in the middle of each of the depressions; with the suture a good deal raised about its central region. Abdomen wide behind the middle of the elytra, where (as in most of the Agrili) the sides of it are a good deal visible from above. Limbs of a rather obscurer hue than (though equally shining with) the rest of the surface; the antennœ being nearly filiform, and internally serrated towards their apex.

Captured by myself about a third of the way up the Ribeiro de Sāo Jorge (in the north of Madeira proper) during August of 1855. I have dedicated the species to Charles Darwin, Esq., M.A., V.P.R.S., whose inquiries into the obscurer phenomena of geographical zoology have contributed more than those of any other man living to our knowledge, in the general questions of animal distribution.

Fam. 25. THROSCIDÆ.

Genus 91. TRIXAGUS.

Kugelann, in Schneid. Mag. v. 534 (1794).

222. Trixagus integer, n. sp.

T. elongato-subellipticus postice attenuatus, rufo-brunneus, dense subflavescente-pubescens, fronte distincte bicostato, oculis magnis convexis integris, elytris leviter striatis, vix seriatim pilosis, inter-


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