RECORD: Darwin, C. R. [1849-1882]. Abstract of Babington, Bromfield, Henslow in Phytologist vol. 3. CUL-DAR73.98-99. Transcribed by Kees Rookmaaker, edited by John van Wyhe (Darwin Online, http://darwin-online.org.uk/).

REVISION HISTORY: Transcribed by Kees Rookmaaker, edited by John van Wyhe 3.2014. RN1

NOTE: References:

Babington, C. C. 1849. Remarks upon Mr. Watson's case between Mr. Andrews and Mr. Babington. Phytologist 3: 542-544.

Bromfield, William Arnold. 1849. A catalogue of the plants growing wild in Hampshire. Phytologist 3: 571-580.

Bromfield, William Arnold. 1849. A catalogue of the plants growing wild in Hampshire. Phytologist 3: 593-609.

Henslow, J. S. 1849. On the experiments of raising Primulae, &c. from seed. Phytologist 3: 651-652.

Bromfield, William Arnold. 1849. A catalogue of the plants growing wild in Hampshire. Phytologist 3: 685-703.

Reproduced with the permission of the Syndics of Cambridge University Library and William Huxley Darwin.


98

p. 544. Mr Babington believes that the plants of the Robertsonian Saxifrages with dentate leaves are by far more common in Ireland, & those with them crenate in the Pyrenees. — (Yet both kinds have been found in both countries.)

p. 573. Dr Bromfield remarks how many plants we have given & how few we have received from N. America — (tide of immigration in that direction C.D) but yet few corn-field imported weeds there. Thinks because fewer social plants, which is in accordance with remark of Humboldt that in approaching the equator the amount of species increase, whilst the individuals of each kind diminish in number, grow further apart or in other words become less social. —

It wd appear that with power of supporting life, the number of forms increase in geometrical progression.

p. 597. Dr Bromfield has in U.S. traced every grade between Datura stramonium & purple D. tatula, but he has never seen the latter var. spontaneous in England.

99

p. 651. Prof. Henslow saw a white var. of Borago officinalis in a hedge, collected seeds & everyone has since borne white flowers, being allowed to sow themselves. — With regard to the Anagallis, he well remarks that the view that there may be one Anagallis "which bears either red or blue flowers & the other is true to blue only" is not only "rather hypothetical not to say somewhat trifling with positive results." —

Asa Gray says in U. S. there are scarlet, sometimes purple, blue & white vars. & with flowers of variable size, of this species. —

p. 699. I see Dr Bromfield remarks on the difference of size of flowers in the vars. of this species — He fully admits Henslows experiments in Loudons Mag. of Nat. Hist. Vol 3. p. 537) & says he has seen the cultivated plant in garden bearing flowers of bright blue on same stem with those of the flesh-coloured var. — Remarks the change from red to blue very rare in nature chromatic sportiveness. — States that there is white var. Leaves various. — Study in Babington what differences consists in. Mem. Gaertner cd not cross. —


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