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A159    Beagle Library:     Milton, John. 1667. Paradise lost: a poem written in ten books. London: Peter Parker.   Text
advance To waste and havoc yonder VVorld, which I So fair and good created, and had still Kept in that state, had not the folly of Man Let in these wastful Furies, who impute Folly to mee, so doth the Prince of Hell And his Adherents, that with so much ease I suffer them to enter and possess A place so heav'nly, and conniving seem To gratifie my scornful Enemies, That laugh, as if transported with some fit Of Passion, I to them had quitted all, At random yeilded up to their misrule; And know not
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CUL-DAR26.1-121    Draft:    [1876.00.00--1882.04.00]   'Recollections of the development of my mind and character' [autobiography] author's fair copy   Text   Image
p.71 (a) With respect to immortality,1 nothing shows me how strong almost instinctive a belief it is, as the consideration of the view now held by most physicists, namely that the sun with all the planets will in time grow too cold for life, unless indeed some great body dashes into the sun thus gives it fresh life. — Believing as I do that man in the distant future will be a far more perfect creature than he now is, it is an intolerable thought that he all other sentient beings are doomed to
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CUL-DAR216.25b-27a    Printed:    1882.04.21   Charles Robert Darwin `Times'   Text   Image
. But this gigantic and fatal error is not to be met by discrediting the senses in their own province. To do so is to invite the ravages of a scepticism which is even deeper than that of the Materialists, since it denies the reality of matter as well as that of spirit, and it is clearly opposed to that high sanction to the evidence of sense which Our Lord gave when He bade Thomas Beach hither thy finger. These reflections may naturally lead us to think of the eminent man whose death during the
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F1452.1    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1887. The life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapter. vol. 1. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
consideration of the view now held by most physicists, namely, that the sun with all the planets will in time grow too cold for life, unless indeed some great body dashes into the sun and thus gives it fresh life. Believing as I do that man in the distant future will be a far more perfect creature than he now is, it is an intolerable thought that he and all other sentient beings are doomed to complete annihilation after such long-continued slow progress. To those who fully admit the immortality of the human
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A551    Pamphlet:     Foote, G. W. 1889. Darwin on God. London: Progressive publishing company.   Text   Image   PDF
of dissatisfaction with the inevitable witness the following passage from his Autobiography. With respect to immortality, nothing shows me so clearly how strong and almost instinctive a belief it is, as the consideration of the view now held by most physicists, namely, that the sun with all the planets will in time grow too cold for life, unless indeed some great body dashes into the sun and thus gives it fresh life. Believing as I do that man in the distant future will be a far more perfect
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F1461    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1892. Charles Darwin: his life told in an autobiographical chapter, and in a selected series of his published letters [abridged edition]. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
of God, any more than the powerful though vague and similar feelings excited by music. With respect to immortality, nothing shows me [so clearly] how strong and almost instinctive a belief it is as the consideration of the view now held by most physicists, namely, that the sun with all the planets will in time grow too cold for life, unless indeed some great body dashes into the sun and thus gives it fresh life. Believing as I do that man in the distant future will be a far more perfect creature
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A260    Book:     Fenton, Carroll Lane. [1924]. Darwin and the theory of evolution. Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius.   Text   Image
, unless indeed some great body dashes into the sun, and thus gives it fresh life. Believing as I do that man in the distant future will be a far more perfect creature than he how is, it is an intolerable thought that he and all other sentient beings are doomed to complete annihilation after such long-continued slow progress. To those who fully admit the immortality of the human soul, the destruction of our world will not appear so dreadful. It is worthy of note, however, that Darwin did not let
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F1497    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1958. The autobiography of Charles Darwin 1809-1882. With the original omissions restored. Edited and with appendix and notes by his grand-daughter Nora Barlow. London: Collins.   Text   Image   PDF
view now held by most physicists, namely that the sun with all the planets will in time grow too cold for life, unless indeed some great body dashes into the sun and thus gives it fresh life. Believing as I do that man in the distant future will be a far more perfect creature than he now is, it is an intolerable thought that he and all other sentient beings are doomed to complete annihilation after such long-continued slow progress. To those who fully admit the immortality of the human soul, the
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