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F1574b    Pamphlet:     de Beer, Gavin ed. 1960. Darwin's notebooks on transmutation of species. Part II. Second notebook [C] (February to July 1838). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 2 (3) (May): 75-118.   Text   Image   PDF
not propagated by nature. Whole art of making varieties may be inferred from facts stated. 134 Shows instinct (Sir J.Sebright admirable essay) hereditary journey wild ducks. lose as well as gain instincts. Wild tame rabbit good instance instincts of many kinds in dogs as clearly applicable to formation of instincts in wild animals many species in one genus external circumstances in both cases effect it. Sir J.Sebright excellent authority because written on dog. Barking applies it to national
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F1574b    Pamphlet:     de Beer, Gavin ed. 1960. Darwin's notebooks on transmutation of species. Part II. Second notebook [C] (February to July 1838). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 2 (3) (May): 75-118.   Text   Image   PDF
cannot be companion but master. Hereditary tameness as well as wildness cf. Sir J. Sebright.5 Love of man gained hereditary, problem solved. Habits become important element in classification because structure has tendency to follow it, or it may be hereditary strictly point out affinities, conduct of Gould,6 166 remark of D'Orbigny7 point out importance of habits in classification. Thought (or desires more properly) being hereditary it is difficult to imagine it anything but structure of brain
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F1574b    Pamphlet:     de Beer, Gavin ed. 1960. Darwin's notebooks on transmutation of species. Part II. Second notebook [C] (February to July 1838). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 2 (3) (May): 75-118.   Text   Image   PDF
structure. the only argument can be a bird practising imperfectly some habit, which the whole rest of other family practise with a peculiar structure, thus Tyrannus sulphureus if compelled solely to fish, structure would alter. It is a difficulty how a different number of vertebrae are produced when ( in all 1 William Yarrell. 2 cf. Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, vol. 1, London 1868, p. 68. 3 Wynne. Unidentified. 4 Sir John Sebright, cf. Variation of Animals and Plants under
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F1574c    Pamphlet:     de Beer, Gavin ed. 1960. Darwin's notebooks on transmutation of species. Part III. Third notebook [D] (July 15 to October 2nd 1838). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 2 (4) (July):119-150.   Text   Image   PDF
William Sharp Macleay. Annulosa in A. Smith: Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa, London 1838, p. 8, footnote, (cf. footnote to MS. p. 52 above.) 5 William Yarrell. Personal communication. 6 Sir John Sebright. Probably personal communication. [page] 14
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F1574c    Pamphlet:     de Beer, Gavin ed. 1960. Darwin's notebooks on transmutation of species. Part III. Third notebook [D] (July 15 to October 2nd 1838). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 2 (4) (July):119-150.   Text   Image   PDF
) that one copulation with other dogs renders subsequent progeny faulty. Does male fail in passion. Disposition of half bred cattle at Combermere? How is jackall dog of Z. Gardens. 1 Sir John Sebright. Reference untraced. 2 Col. William Henry Sykes. Reference untraced. 3 Collection des Suites Buff on, formant avec les oeuvres de cet auteur un cours compl t d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris 1834 (or other edition). 4William Youatt. The Horse, with Treatise on Draught , Library of Useful Knowledge, Farm
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F1574e    Pamphlet:     de Beer, Gavin, Rowlands, M. J. eds. 1961. Darwin's notebooks on transmutation of species. Addenda and corrigenda. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 2 (6) (October) 185-200.   Text   Image   PDF
of Birds, London 1814, vol. 1, p. 72; Goldfinches are put in small cages, with wooden backs, and placed near to, but so that they cannot see, each other; they will then raise their shrill voices, and continue their vocal contest till one frequently drops off its perch, perfectly exhausted 7 Sir John Sebright. 8 William Yarrell. Personal communication. 9 A line is drawn across the page with the figure 2 in a circle, to the right of which is the figure 12 in pencil. 10 William Yarrell. Personal
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CUL-DAR119.-    Note:    1838.00.00--1851.00.00   'Books to be read' and 'Books Read' notebook   Text   Image
and Gaimard, Joseph Paul. 1830-4. Zoologie. 4 vols, in Dumont d'Urville, Jules Sébastien César, Voyage de la corvette L'Astrolabe. 12 vols. Paris. 1830-5. [Saint Pierre, Jacques Henri Bernadin de]. 1773. Voyage à I'Isle de France, à I'Isle de Bourbon. 2 vols. Neuchâtel. [Edition unknown] Sebright, John Saunders. 1809. The art of improving the breeds of domestic animals. In a letter addressed to the Right Hon. Sir Joseph Banks. London. [Darwin Pamphlet Collection in CUL.] Sebright, John Saunders
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CUL-DAR126.-    Note:    1838.00.00--1839.00.00   Notebook N: [Metaphysics and expression]   Text   Image
intellect—hopes, which as they cannot be gratified here, belong to a frame of mind suited to a nobler state of existence. 63 March 16th. — Is not that kind of memory, which makes you do a thing properly, even when you cannot remember it, as my father trying to remember the man's Christian name,1 writing for the surname, analogous to instinctive memory, consequently instinctive action. — Sir. J. Sebright,2 has given the phrase heredetary habits . very clearly, all I must do is to generalize it
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F1582    Book contribution:     Barrett, P. H. 1974. Early writings of Charles Darwin. In Gruber, H. E., Darwin on man. A psychological study of scientific creativity; together with Darwin's early and unpublished notebooks. Transcribed and annotated by Paul H. Barrett, commentary by Howard E. Gruber. Foreword by Jean Piaget. London: Wildwood House. [Notebooks M, N, Old and useless notes, Essay on theology and natural selection, Questions for Mr. Wynn, Extracts from B-C-D-E transmutation notebooks, A Biographical Sketch of Charles Darwin's Father, Plinian Society Minutes Book]   Text
. 186. Sebright, John, Observations upon the Instinct of Animals, Gossling Egley, London (pamphlet), 1836, 16 pp., pp. 15 16: No one can suppose that nature has given to these several varieties of the same species such very different instinctive propensities, and that each of these breeds should possess those that are best fitted for the uses to which they are respectively applied. It seems more probable that these breeds having been long treated as they now are, and applied to the same uses
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CUL-DAR122.-    Note:    1838.02.00--1838.07.00   Notebook C: [Transmutation of species]   Text   Image
grant that difficult other go back to either parent. — 1 Sir John Sebright. Observations upon the instinct of Animals, London 1836. [According to D. Kohn this is actually a reference to Sebright. 1809. The Art of Improving the Breeds of Domestic Animals. London] 2 J. Wilkinson. Remarks addressed to Sir J. Sebright , London 1820. 13
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CUL-DAR122.-    Note:    1838.02.00--1838.07.00   Notebook C: [Transmutation of species]   Text   Image
Shows instinct (Sir J.Sebright admirable essay) hereditary journey wild ducks. — lose as well as gain instincts. Wild tame rabbit good instance—instincts of many kinds in dogs as clearly applicable to formation of instincts in wild animals many species in one genus external circumstances in both cases effect it. — Sir J.Sebright excellent authority because written on dog. Barking—applies it to national character. — 13
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CUL-DAR122.-    Note:    1838.02.00--1838.07.00   Notebook C: [Transmutation of species]   Text   Image
The attachment of dogs to man not altogether explained by F. Cuvier,1 Mem. Hensleigh's2 objection. — it is more, he cuts the matter short by saying man cannot be companion but master. — hereditary tameness as well as wildness — cf Sir J. Sebright.3 — Love of man gained hereditary, problem solved. habits become important element in classification because structure has tendency to follow it, or it may be hereditary strictly point out affinities, conduct of Gould,4 remark of D'Orbigny5 point out
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CUL-DAR122.-    Note:    1838.02.00--1838.07.00   Notebook C: [Transmutation of species]   Text   Image
first got5 point on hackles on Bantams by crossing with common Polish cock is not that old variety then recrossing offspring till size diminished, but feathers continued by picking chicken of each brood. — These bantam feathers 1 William Yarrell. 2 cf. Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, vol. 1, London 1868, p. 68. 3 Wynne. Unidentified. 4 Sir John Sebright, cf. Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, vol. 2, London 1868, p. 197. 5 A small drawing at this place in MS
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CUL-DAR123.-    Note:    1838.07.15--1838.10.02   Notebook D: [Transmutation of species]   Text   Image
Cervus Campestris spotted white when a fawn compare with fallow? deer. Moschus c — like young blackbirds Dr Bachman told me that 1/2 Muscovy common duck were often caught wild off coast of America.— showing hybrids can fare for themselves. + + first year. — The bird fanciers match their birds to see which will sing longest, they in evident rivalry sing against each other, till it has been known one has killed itself. — Sir. J. Sebright — has almost lost his Owl-Pidgeons from infertility
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CUL-DAR123.-    Note:    1838.07.15--1838.10.02   Notebook D: [Transmutation of species]   Text   Image
from long permanence, so that all their peculiarities must be transmitted if their 1 William Yarrell. Personal communication. 2 Sir John Sebright. Probably personal communication. 109e-110e [not found] 11
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CUL-DAR123.-    Note:    1838.07.15--1838.10.02   Notebook D: [Transmutation of species]   Text   Image
Sir John Sebright. Reference untraced. 5 Col. William Henry Sykes. Reference untraced. 18
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CUL-DAR206.1    Note:    [1839.00.00--1844.00.00]   Questions & experiments   Text   Image
Wm Yarrell (1) About non-breeding of animals in confinement, curious. — foxes — English animals. (Made no import. remark) (2) Secondary male characters. — does male transmit to male more of his features — in negro white (3) About the Bantams at Zoolog Soc. — did Sir. J. Sebright select to destroy secondary character believe no or did result appear without his wish [marginal] Has since recrossed this breed. — Have secondary male characters appeared. — (4) Does he know any seed-raisers (5) List
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
of selection have been methodically followed for scarcely a century; but their high importance is shown by the practical results, and is admitted in the writings of the most celebrated agriculturalists and horticulturalists;—I need only name Anderson, Marshall, Bakewell, Coke, Western, Sebright and Knight. Even in well-established breeds the individuals of which to an unpractised eye would appear absolutely similar, which would give, it might have been thought, no scope to selection, the whole
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
, from being very unwilling to cross his breed, he almost lost them, so infertile had they become, until he was obliged to resort to a cross when his breed became fertile./ 2 bis/The evidence of an acute observer like Sir John Sebright, who bred all sorts of animals during his whole life, who boasted that he could produce any feather in [three] years any form in [six] years;3 who always worked by crossing thereby closely interbreeding, is very good; he was a most firm believer4 in the ill effects
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
, so seldom requiring to be taught not to worry sheep or poultry; yet every wild canine animal would at once attack/43/them. This was the case with a native dog from Australia, whelped on board a ship, which Sir J. Sebright tried for a year to tame, but which if led near sheep or poultry became quite furious ; so again Captain Fitz Roy3 says that not one of the many dogs, procured from the natives of Tierra del Fuego Patagonia, which were brought to England could easily be prevented from
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Description of the Scottish Forests; Legends; Superstitions; Stories; of Poachers and Freebooters, c. c. 2nd ed. London, 1839. III, 4. IV, 42. x, 49, 110. Days and Nights of Salmon Fishing in the Tweed; with a short account of the Natural History and Habits of the Salmon, instructions to sportsmen, anecdotes, etc. London: Murray, 1843. x, 54. Sebright, Sir John Saunders. [The Art of Improving the Breeds of Domestic Animals. In a letter addressed to the Right Hon. Sir Joseph Banks, K.B. London, 1809
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
, that is with the amount of resemblance which can anyhow 1 W. Youatt. Cattle 1834. p 202. 2 in his well known Remarks addressed to Sir J. Sebright 1820. p. 38. [page] 444 HYBRIDIS
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Scrope, William Crossed dogs with mixed instincts, 490 n 2 Deer: Expel wounded when pursued by dogs, 524 n 2; Size reduced by interbreeding, 37 n 5; Varieties of Red, 117 n 3 Migratory direction finding in salmon, 493 n 1 Scrophulariaceae: Dichogamy, 47; Irregular flowers need longer development, 303; Varieties in large and small genera, 153 table Sebright, Sir John Dogs: Different mode of hunting in hounds and harriers, 485 n 1; Instinctive love of man, 489; Native cannot learn to leave sheep
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
; on the same principle that the horns of deer are affected by emasculation, by the amount of food,/72/or by unnatural conditions as confinement on shipboard;/72 v/and I think this explanation may be true to a large extent. We must, however, be cautious in inferring loss of virile powers from loss of the secondary male characters; to give one instance; Sebright Bantam has not sickle feathers in the tail, yet a writer in Poultry Chronicle, shows that one thus deficient, was the father of an
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
great difference in size between two varieties be strictly considered as causing lessened fertility. Thus it is well known that bitches paired with dogs of large size, often die during parturition. I presume very unequal size would sometimes interfere with the union of varieties; though A. Knight got offspring from a Dray stallion Norwegian Pony1 chickens from a Cochin cock Sebright Bantam Hen were exhibited at Manchester2 /102/When we hear that certain domestic breeds of native American dogs3
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
have given details in a former chapter,3 showing that during at least the last 250 years these birds have been known to tumble on the ground, after being slightly shaken, to continue tumbling until taken up blown on. As this breed has gone on so long, the habit can hardly be called a disease. 1 Sir J. Sebright on Instinct p. 18 2 Molina Hist. Nat. Chile vol. I p. 302. [Actually p. 368.] Dobrizhoffer Account of the Abipones vol I p. 225, See Rollin, [Roulin] Mem. divers Savans c Tom rv. [vi] p 387
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
as Sir J. Sebright has remarked, they appear to inherit an instinctive love of man. I could give several instances of partially or wholly lost instincts. Two examples will suffice: Chinese Polynesian dogs, though so strictly carnivorous animals, from having been for many generations fed on vegetable food, have lost their' instinctive taste for flesh.1 Considering the general habits of Birds, it must be, as Paley has remarked, a most strong impulse which leads a bird to sit so closely on her
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Wight, Robert. 'Statistical Observations on the Vurragherries, or Pulney Mountains.' Madras J. Lit. Sci., 5 (1837), 280 9. xI, 18. Wilcke, H. C. D. See Linn . Wilkinson, John. Remarks on the Improvement of Cattle, etc., in a Letter to Sir John Sounders Sebright.. .Nottingham, 1820. Ix, 104. [Not seen. The only listing found for this is in the Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Library Catalogue of Printed Books and Pamphlets on Agriculture published between 1471 and 1840, compiled by
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Hewitt, Edward (cont.) silver pheasant, 429; Gold x silver pheasant, 435 n 4; Unsuccessful common hen x silver or gold pheasant, 435 n 3; Pheasant x (fowl x pheasant), 435 n Pheasant prefers own species after habitation with common fowl, 428 n 3 Prepotency: Fowl x pheasant, 457 n 1, 458; Wild disposition over domestic, 486 Secondary sexual characters and virile force deficient: in Sebright bantams, 316 n 1; pheasant hybrids, 429, 452 Sterility of hybrid Gallinaceae trom aborted embryos, 422
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CUL-DAR120.-    Note:    1838.00.00   'Books' [read] alphabetical catalogue   Text   Image
years 1820 and 1821: with some sketches of the productions and agriculture; mines and metallurgy; inhabitants, history, and other features, of America; particularly of Chile, and Arauco. London. Sebright, John Saunders. 1809. The art of improving the breeds of domestic animals. In a letter addressed to the Right Hon. Sir Joseph Banks. London. [Darwin Pamphlet Collection in CUL.] Sebright, John Saunders. 1836. Observations upon the instinct of animals. London. [Darwin Pamphlet Collection in CUL
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CUL-DAR120.-    Note:    1838.00.00   'Books' [read] alphabetical catalogue   Text   Image
.] Wilkinson, John. 1820. Remarks on the improvement of cattle, c. in a letter to Sir John Saunders Sebright, Bart. M.D. 3d ed. Nottingham. [Darwin Pamphlet Collection in CUL.] Woodard, David. 1804. The narrative of Captain David Woodard and four seamen, who lost their ship and surrendered themselves up to the Malays, in the Island of Celebes. Together with narratives of various escapes from shipwrecks. [Edited by W. Vaughen.] London. Wrangel, Ferdinand Petrovich. 1840. Narrative of an expedition to the
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F373    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1859. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. 1st edition, 1st issue.   Text   Image   PDF
intermediate between two extremely different races or speceies, I can hardly believe. Sir J. Sebright expressly experimentised for this object, and failed. The offspring from the first cross between two pure breeds is tolerably and sometimes (as I have found with pigeons) extremely uniform, and everything seems simple enough; but when these mongrels are crossed one with another for several generations, hardly two of them will be alike, and then the extreme difficulty, or rather utter hopelessness
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F373    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1859. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. 1st edition, 1st issue.   Text   Image   PDF
itself, and then had given it existence. That most skilful breeder, Sir John Sebright, used to say, with respect to pigeons, that he would produce any given feather in three years, but it would take him six years to obtain head and beak. In Saxony the importance of the principle of selection in regard to merino sheep is so fully recognised, that men follow it as a trade: the sheep are placed on a table and are studied, like a picture by a connoisseur; this is done three times at intervals of
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F373    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1859. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. 1st edition, 1st issue.   Text   Image   PDF
RODENTS. Rodents, blind, 137. Rudimentary organs, 450. Rudiments important for classification, 416. S. Sageret on grafts, 262. Salmons, males fighting, and hooked jaws of, 88. Salt-water, how far injurious to seeds, 358. Saurophagus sulphuratus, 183. Schiödte on blind insects, 138. Schlegel on snakes, 144. Sea-water, how far injurious to seeds, 358. Sebright, Sir J., on crossed animals, 20. ——, on selection of pigeons, 31. Sedgwick, Prof., on groups of species suddenly appearing, 302
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F2056.1    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1860. Het ontstaan der soorten van dieren en planten door middel van de natuurkeus, of het bewaard blijven van bevoorregte rassen in de strijd des levens. With a preface and an epilogue by the translator Tiberius Cornelius Winkler. 1st ed. Haarlem: A. C. Kruseman, 2 vols. Volume 1.   Text   Image
OVER DE RASSEN DER TAMME DUIF. 31 of soorten, is iets wat mij ongeloofelijk voorkomt. J. SEBRIGHT nam juist in dezen zin eene menigte proeven, maar allen mislukten. De jongen van de eerste kruising tusschen twee zuivere rassen zijn vrij gelijk aan de ouden, wat mij vooral bij duiven gebleken is, en de proef schijnt wel te gelukken; maar wanneer die jongen onderling gedurende eenige generatiën gekruist worden, zullen er naauwelijks twee individuen op elkander gelijken, en het wordt duidelijk
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F376    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1860. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. 2d edition, second issue.   Text   Image   PDF
occasional crosses, if aided by the careful selection of those individual mongrels, which present any desired character; but that a race could be obtained nearly intermediate between two extremely different races or species, I can hardly believe. Sir J. Sebright expressly experimentised for this object, and failed. The offspring from the first cross between two pure breeds is tolerably and sometimes (as I have found with pigeons) extremely uniform, and everything seems simple enough; but when these
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F376    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1860. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. 2d edition, second issue.   Text   Image   PDF
itself, and then had given it existence. That most skilful breeder, Sir John Sebright, used to say, with respect to pigeons, that he would produce any given feather in three years, but it would take him six years to obtain head and beak. In Saxony the importance of the principle of selection in regard to merino sheep is so fully recognised, that men follow it as a trade: the sheep are placed on a table and are studied, like a picture by a connoisseur; this is done three times at intervals of months
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F2056.1    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1860. Het ontstaan der soorten van dieren en planten door middel van de natuurkeus, of het bewaard blijven van bevoorregte rassen in de strijd des levens. With a preface and an epilogue by the translator Tiberius Cornelius Winkler. 1st ed. Haarlem: A. C. Kruseman, 2 vols. Volume 1.   Text   Image
: het schijnt als of zij eerst eene gedaante gevormd en die vervolgens levend gemaakt hebben. Sir JOHN SEBRIGHT was gewoon te zeggen, sprekende over duiven, dat hij eene vooraf bepaalde kleur in drie jaren kon voortbrengen, maar dat hij zes jaren noodig had om een kop en een bek te vormen. In Saksen stelt men zooveel belang in het doen van eene goede keus ten opzigte van de merinoschapen, dat men er zelfs eene soort van handwerk van maakt: de schapen worden op eene tafel geplaatst en bekeken zooals
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F376    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1860. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. 2d edition, second issue.   Text   Image   PDF
RODENTS. STRIPES. Rodents, blind, 137. Rudimentary organs, 450. Rudiments important for classification, 416. S. Sagaret on grafts, 262. Salmons, males fighting, and hooked jaws of, 88. Salt-water, how far injurious to seeds, 358. Saurophagus sulphuratus, 183. Schiödte on blind insects, 138. Schlegel on snakes, 144. Sea-water, how far injurious to seeds, 358. Sebright, Sir J., on crossed animals, 20. ——, on selection of pigeons, 31. Sedgwick, Prof., on groups of species suddenly appearing, 302
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F380    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1860. The origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. New York: D. Appleton. New edition, revised and augmented.   Text   Image   PDF
the Italian greyhound, bloodhound, bull-dog, c., in the wild state. Moreover, the possibility of making distinct races by crossing has been greatly exaggerated. There can be no doubt that a race may be modified by occasional crosses, if aided by the careful selection of those individual mongrels, which present any desired character; but that a race could be obtained nearly intermediate between two extremely different races or species, I can hardly believe. Sir J. Sebright expressly experimentised
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F380    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1860. The origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. New York: D. Appleton. New edition, revised and augmented.   Text   Image   PDF
existence. That most skilful breeder, Sir John Sebright, used to say, with respect to pigeons, that he would produce any given feather in three years, but it would take him six years to [page] 3
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A19    Review:     [Wilberforce, Samuel]. 1860. [Review of] On the Origin of Species, by means of Natural Selection; or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. By Charles Darwin, M. A., F.R.S. London, 1860. Quarterly Review 108: 225-264.   Text   Image
we follow pigeons on down to the days of 'that most skilful breeder Sir John Sebright,' who 'used to say, with respect to pigeons, that he would produce any given feather in three years, but it would take him six years to produce beak and head. (p. 31.) Now all this is very pleasant writing, especially for pigeon-fanciers; but what step do we really gain in it at all towards establishing the alleged fact that variations are but species in the act of formation, or in establishing Mr. Darwin's
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A253    Review:     [Morris, John.] 1860. [Review of] On the origin of species. Dublin Review 48: 50-81.   Text   Image
would seem as if they had chalked out upon a wall a form perfect in itself, and then had given it existence.' That most skilful breeder, Sir John Sebright, used to say, with respect to pigeons, that 'he would produce any given feather in three years, but it would take him six years to obtain head and beak.' In Saxony the importance of the principle of selection in regard to merino sheep is so fully recognised, that men follow it as a trade: the sheep are placed on a table and are studied, like a
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F380    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1860. The origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. New York: D. Appleton. New edition, revised and augmented.   Text   Image   PDF
, grafts of, 231. Rodents, blind, 125. Rudimentary organs, 391. Rudiments important for classification, 362. Sageret on grafts, 231. Salmons, males fighting, and hooked jaws of, 84. Salt water, how far injurious to seeds, 312. Saurophagus sulphuratus, 164. Schi dte on blind insects, 126. Schlegel on snakes, 131. Sea-water, how far injurious to seeds, 312. Sebright, Sir J., on crossed animals, 25. on selection of pigeons, 34. Sedgwick, Prof., on groups of species suddenly appearing, 264. Seedlings
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A512    Review:     [Church, W. R.] 1860. [Review of] On the origin of species. Guardian (London) (8 February): 134-135.   Text   Image
what breeders have done for sheep, says It would seem as if they had chalked out upon a wall a form perfect in itself, and then had given it existence. That most skilful breeder, Sir John Sebright, used to say, with respect to pigeons, that he would produce any given feather in three years, but it would take him six years to obtain head and beak. In Saxony the importance of the principle of selection in regard to merino sheep is so fully recognised, that men follow it as a trade; the sheep are
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F381    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1861. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. 3d edition. Seventh thousand.   Text   Image   PDF
, bloodhound, bull-dog, c., in the wild state. Moreover, the possibility of making distinct races by crossing has been greatly exaggerated. Many cases are on record, showing that a race may be modified by occasional crosses, if aided by the careful selection of those individual mongrels which present any desired character; but that a race could be obtained nearly intermediate between two extremely different races or species, I can hardly believe. Sir J. Sebright expressly experimented for this object, and
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F381    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1861. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. 3d edition. Seventh thousand.   Text   Image   PDF
as if they had chalked out upon a wall a form perfect in itself, and then had given it existence. That most skilful breeder, Sir John Sebright, used to say, with respect to pigeons, that he would produce any given feather in three years, but it would take him six years to obtain head and beak. In Saxony the importance of the principle of selection in regard to merino sheep is so fully recognised, that men follow it as a trade: the sheep are placed on a table and are studied, like a picture by a
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F381    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1861. On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. 3d edition. Seventh thousand.   Text   Image   PDF
selection of sheep, 32. Saurophagus sulphuratus, 201. Schiödte on blind insects, 155. Sorbus, grafts of, 284. Schlegel on snakes, 162. Spaniel, King Charles's breed, 36. Sea-water, how far injurious to seeds, 388. Specialisation of organs, 134. Species, polymorphic, 48. Sebright, Sir J., on crossed animals, 20. ——, dominant, 56. ——, on selection of pigeons, 32. ——, common, variable, 55. Sedgwick, Prof., on groups of species suddenly appearing, 327. —— in large genera variable, 57. ——, groups of
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F655    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1862. De l'origine des espèces ou des lois du progrès chez les êtres organisés. Translated and with preface and notes by Mlle Clémence-Auguste Royer. Paris: Guillaumin et Cie.   Text   Image   PDF
leveurs ont fait l' gard des moutons: Il semblerait qu'ils eussent esquiss une forme parfaite, et qu'ils lui eussent ensuite donn l'existence. L'habile leveur, sir John Sebright, dit des pigeons qu'il r pondait de produire quelque plumage que ce f t en trois ans; mais qu'il lui en fallait six pour obtenir la t te et le bec. En Saxe, l'importance du principe d' lection l' gard des moutons m rinos est si pleinement reconnue, que certains individus s'en sont fait un m tier. Trois fois l'ann e, chaque
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F655    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1862. De l'origine des espèces ou des lois du progrès chez les êtres organisés. Translated and with preface and notes by Mlle Clémence-Auguste Royer. Paris: Guillaumin et Cie.   Text   Image   PDF
dants crois s qui pr sentent le caract re d sir ; mais qu'on puisse obtenir une race presque interm diaire entre deux autres tr s-diff rentes, j'ai quelque peine le croire. Sir J. Sebright a fait des exp riences express ment dirig es dans ce but, et n'a pu r ussir. Les produits du premier croisement entre deux races pures sont en g n ral assez uniformes et quelquefois parfaitement identiques ainsi que je l'ai vu pour les pigeons. Les choses semblent donc assez simples jusque-l ; mais quand ces
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