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F1582    Book contribution:     Barrett, P. H. 1974. Early writings of Charles Darwin. In Gruber, H. E., Darwin on man. A psychological study of scientific creativity; together with Darwin's early and unpublished notebooks. Transcribed and annotated by Paul H. Barrett, commentary by Howard E. Gruber. Foreword by Jean Piaget. London: Wildwood House. [Notebooks M, N, Old and useless notes, Essay on theology and natural selection, Questions for Mr. Wynn, Extracts from B-C-D-E transmutation notebooks, A Biographical Sketch of Charles Darwin's Father, Plinian Society Minutes Book]   Text
he allowed himself the satisfaction of writing out the first acknowledged briefest sketch. Another interesting aspect of this early undated discourse is that in it Darwin tests the power of his own theory against that of Providential Design in explaining the origin of special adaptations. He concludes that the Creationists' theory lacks predictive power, and is also deficient in explaining many known sets of facts, such as, for example, geographical patterns of species' dispersions, vestigial
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F1555    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species, a sketch written in 1842. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
to capabilities of the country: furthermore not always those best adapted, perhaps explained by creationists by changes and progress. See p. 34, note 1. Although creationists can, by help of geology, explain much, how can he explain the marked relation of past and present in same area, the varying relation in other cases, between past and present, the relation of different parts of same great area. If island, to adjoining continent, if quite different, on mountain summits, the number of
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
to capabilities of the country: furthermore not always those best adapted, perhaps explained by creationists by changes and progress. See p. 34, note 1. Although creationists can, by help of geology, explain much, how can he explain the marked relation of past and present in same area, the varying relation in other cases, between past and present, the relation of different parts of same great area. If island, to adjoining continent, if quite different, on mountain summits,—the number of
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
, first changes in the geographical distribution, and secondly a period when the mammiferous forms most distinctive of two of the present main divisions of the world were living together2. I think then I am justified in asserting that most of the above enumerated and often trivial points in the geographical distribution of past and present organisms (which points must be viewed by the creationists as so many ultimate facts) follow as a simple consequence of specific forms being mutable and of their
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F1555    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species, a sketch written in 1842. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
causing much extermination1. The mountains of Europe were quite lately covered with ice, and the lowlands probably partaking of the Arctic climate and Fauna. Then as climate changed, arctic fauna would take place of ice, and an inundation of plants from different temperate countries would seize the lowlands, leaving islands of arctic forms. But if this had happened on an island, whence could the new forms have come, here the geologist calls in creationists. If island formed, the geologist will
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
causing much extermination1. The mountains of Europe were quite lately covered with ice, and the lowlands probably partaking of the Arctic climate and Fauna. Then as climate changed, arctic fauna would take place of ice, and an inundation of plants from different temperate countries would seize the lowlands, leaving islands of arctic forms. But if this had happened on an island, whence could the new forms have come,—here the geologist calls in creationists. If island formed, the geologist will
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F1583    Book:     Stauffer, R. C. ed. 1975. Charles Darwin's Natural Selection; being the second part of his big species book written from 1856 to 1858. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
are widely extended. When a genus began to fail die out, if large, it wd leave probably a few species in distant quarters of the world: Hence this wd be another cause of small genera: these wd be aberrant. The mere fact of large genera, generally being wider can be accounted for by creationists showing that if a genus be created in different distant quarters it wd probably form so many local species. If inhabitants of S. America Australia turned into each other by an isthmus I shd expect the
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F1452.2    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1887. The life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapter. vol. 2. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
paper for this volume, I had awful misgivings; and thought perhaps I had deluded myself, like so many have done, and I then fixed in my mind three judges, on whose decision I determined mentally to abide. The judges were Lyell, Hooker, and yourself. It was this which made me so excessively anxious for your verdict. I am now contented, and can sing my nunc dimittis. What a joke it would be if I pat you on the back when you attack some immovable creationists! You have most cleverly hit on one
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F1452.2    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1887. The life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapter. vol. 2. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
those who give up multitudes of species as true species, but believe in the remainder p. 500. He slightly alters what I say, I ask whether creationists really believe that elemental atoms have flashed into life. He says that I describe them as so believing, and this, surely, is a difference p. 501. He speaks of my clamouring against all who believe in creation, and this seems to me an unjust accusation p. 501. He makes me say that the dorsal vertebr vary; this is simply false: I nowhere say a
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F1452.2    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1887. The life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapter. vol. 2. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
the difficulties of the case from a creationist's point of view: By what means, it may be asked, have so many butterflies of the Amazonian region acquired their deceptive dress? Most naturalists will answer that they were thus clothed from the hour of their creation an answer which will generally be so far triumphant that it can be met only by long-drawn arguments; but it is made at the expense of putting an effectual bar to all further inquiry. In this particular case, moreover, the
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A268    Book:     Holder, Charles Frederick. 1892. Charles Darwin: his life and work. New York: G. P. Putnam's sons.   Text   Image
Evolution. 203 hand, Creation was the rallying cry ; on the other, Evolution and Darwin. But what meant the opposed terms ? It is surely but reasonable to ask the question. The evolutionists conceded the reasonableness, and gladly accepted the ordeal. Could less be required of the creationists ? In reverential mood would I submit the alternatives. If they repel, blame not me. I have long and fruitlessly searched for better. Creation implies the actual fashioning of forms in full panoply, and
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F1461    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1892. Charles Darwin: his life told in an autobiographical chapter, and in a selected series of his published letters [abridged edition]. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
a joke it would be if I pat you on the back when you attack some immovable creationists! You have most cleverly hit on one point, which has greatly troubled me; if, as I must think, external conditions produce little direct effect, what the devil determines each particular variation? What makes a tuft of feathers come on a cock's head, or moss on a moss-rose? I shall much like to talk over this with you. . . . My dear Huxley, I thank you cordially for your letter. Yours very sincerely. Erasmus
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F1461    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1892. Charles Darwin: his life told in an autobiographical chapter, and in a selected series of his published letters [abridged edition]. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
creationist's point of view: By what means, it may be asked, have so many butterflies of the Amazonian region acquired their deceptive dress? Most naturalists will answer that they were thus clothed from the hour of their creation an answer which will generally be so far triumphant that it can be met only by long-drawn arguments; but it is made at the expense of putting an effectual bar to all further inquiry. In this particular case, moreover, the creationist will meet with special difficulties
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F1548.1    Book:     Darwin, Francis & Seward, A. C. eds. 1903. More letters of Charles Darwin. A record of his work in a series of hitherto unpublished letters. London: John Murray. Volume 1   Text   Image   PDF
Letter 48. TO J.D. HOOKER. Down, July 5th [1856]. I write this morning in great tribulation about Tristan d'Acunha.1 The more I reflect on your Antarctic flora the more I am astounded. You give all the facts so clearly and fully, that it is impossible to help speculating on the subject; but it drives me to despair, for I cannot gulp down your continent; and not being able to do so gives, in my eyes, the multiple creationists an awful triumph. It is a wondrous case, and how strange that A. De
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F1548.1    Book:     Darwin, Francis & Seward, A. C. eds. 1903. More letters of Charles Darwin. A record of his work in a series of hitherto unpublished letters. London: John Murray. Volume 1   Text   Image   PDF
impossible to imagine so many co-adaptations being formed all by a chance blow. Of course creationists would cut the enigma. Letter 170. TO T.H. HUXLEY. June 27th [1863?] What are you doing now? I have never yet got hold of the Edinburgh Review, in which I hear you are well abused. By the way, I heard lately from Asa Gray that Wyman was delighted at Man's Place. 2 I wonder who it is who pitches weakly, but virulently into you, in the Anthropological Review. How quiet Owen seems! I do at last begin
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F1548.1    Book:     Darwin, Francis & Seward, A. C. eds. 1903. More letters of Charles Darwin. A record of his work in a series of hitherto unpublished letters. London: John Murray. Volume 1   Text   Image   PDF
creationists or continental extensionists had here a complete victory. The few eggs which I have tried both sink and are killed. No one doubts that salt water would be eminently destructive to them; and I was really in despair, when I thought I would try them when torpid; and this day I have taken a lot out of the sea-water, after exactly seven days' immersion.1 Some sink and some swim; and in both cases I have had (as yet) one come to life again, which has quite astonished and delighted me. I feel as if a
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A260    Book:     Fenton, Carroll Lane. [1924]. Darwin and the theory of evolution. Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius.   Text   Image
Hilaire came quite independently to the conclusion that species were not permanent, and each offered some explanation of the process of change. Following them came Lamarck, a leader of the French anti-creationists, who published, between the years of 1800 and 1815, a series of books, whose great thesis was that every living thing, including man himself, was descended from some earlier, and in most cases simpler living thing. These books attracted much attention, especially because of the
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A875    Book:     Bradford, Gamaliel. 1926. Darwin. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin.   Text   Image   PDF
fully, that it is impossible to help speculating on the subject; but it drives me to despair, for I cannot gulp down your continent; and not to be able to do so gives, in my eyes, the multiple creationists an awful triumph.'60 And with his extraordinary gift of direct self-revelation, Darwin sums up the state of mind in one vivid sentence: 'Your letter actually turned me sick with panic.'61 Thus there are times of discouragement and disgust. One gets to feel that one has utterly overestimated
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A179    Book:     Ward, Henshaw. 1927. Charles Darwin: The man and his warfare. London: John Murray.   Text   Image
he was a complete agnostic about evolution theories before the appearance of the Origin. If creationists asked him to approve one of their theories, he answered, Show me some particle of evidence. I had exactly the same answer to give to the evolutionists of 1851-8. Within the ranks of the biologists, at that time, I met with nobody, except Dr. Grant, of University College, who had a word to say for Evolution and his advocacy was not calculated to advance the cause. Outside these ranks, the only
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