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A734    Beagle Library:     Wafer, Lionel. 1699. A new voyage and description of the isthmus of America. London: James Knapton.   Text
take with them one or two Dogs apiece, to beat about; and there go as well Women as Men. When I went with them a Hunting, a young Woman was appointed me to wait on me, and carry my Basket of Provisions. Provisions. The Game. The Women carry in their Baskets, Plantains, Bonanoes, Yams, Potatoes and Cassava-roots, ready roasted; but in the Woods, among the ruin'd Plantations, they often meet with green Plantains which they dress there, and with these Roots: So that if they go designedly among
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A810    Beagle Library:     Michell, John. 1760. Conjectures concerning the cause, and observations upon the phaenomena of earthquakes, particularly of that great earthquake of the First of November, 1755, which proved so fatal to the City of Lisbon, and whose effects were felt as far as Africa, and more or less throughout almost all Europe. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London 51: 566-634.   Text
I endeavoured to shew how the principal ph omena of earthquakes may be produced, by a cause with which none, that I have seen, appear to me to be incompatible. As I have not knowingly misrepresented any fact, so neither have I designedly omitted any that appeared to affect the main question; but, that I might not unnecessarily swell what had already much exceeded the limits at first intended for it, I have omitted, 106. First, Those minuter appearances, which almost every reader would easily
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A822.04    Beagle Library:     Richardson, Samuel. 1781. The history of Sir Charles Grandison. 7 vols. London: Strachan. Volume 4.   Text
of Lady Sforza; and her talk being all on this subject, they were both highly displeased; and hinted, that she was too much indulged in it; and, unhappily, she repeating some tender passages that passed in the interview her mother had permitted her to hold with the chevalier, the general would have it, that Mr. Grandison had designedly, from the first, sought to give himself consequence with her; and expressed himself, on the occasion, with great violence against him. He carried his displeasure
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A897.1    Beagle Library:     Pennant, Thomas. 1793. History of quadrupeds. 3rd ed. 2 vols. London: B. & J. White. Volume 1.   Text
In this I had opportunity of examining the teeth: the cutting-teeth were like those of the rest of the genus; but in the upper and lower jaw were two canine, or rather tushes, near three inches long, and exceedingly sharp and pointed. This makes me subscribe to Mr. Scbreber's opinion, that the TUFTED APE of my former edition was designedly cropped and disguised by its keeper, to render it a monster *. I offer in my defence of having inserted it as a genuine species, that it had been described
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A801.01    Beagle Library:     La Pérouse, Jean François de Galaup de. 1798-9. A voyage round the world performed in the years 1785, 1786, 1787, and 1788. 3 vols., atlas. London: T. Johnson. Volume 1.   Text
water we intended to take in; an infinite number of canoes came nevertheless to the frigate to make exchanges, and their confidence in us was such that many slept and passed the whole night on board. On the last of these days, the King invited me to an entertainment which he had prepared to give me; upon going on shore on the 12th, I saw, in the thicket or wood, a large open space which had been designedly cleared, insomuch that there did not remain a single piece of a trunk standing. A little
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A925.4    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 4 (1816)   Text
CHAP. 6. 1971. Expedition against Panama. The City burnt. fixed their quarters in Panama, several parts of the city burst out in flames, which spread so rapidly, that in a short time many magnificent edifices built with cedar, and a great part of the city, were burnt to the ground. Whether this was done designedly, or happened accidentally, owing to the consternation of the inhabitants during the assault, has been disputed. Morgan is accused of having directed some of his people to commit this
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A925.2    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 2 (1806)   Text
undertaking, that the General seems to have acted remissly in not removing him from his command. Notwithstanding these representations, some writers of that time, who notice the voyage, do not charge Villalobos with having designedly separated from Sarmiento. Jos. Acosta*, who received his information from the pilot of the Almiranta, Hernando Lamero, lays the blame of the separation on the Capitana for not carrying a good light. Villalobos afterwards went in quest of his commander, and was forced from
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A925.2    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 2 (1806)   Text
circumstances have been more minutely attended to than their importance in other respects would have made necessary. The preface to the Nav. Aust. alleges, that by the opposition of the Patron to the designs of the President, the discovery of the Southern Continent was prevented; and that the Patron expended the wine uselessly, and was not careful of the provisions, as if designedly to prevent the success of the voyage. If blame is attached to their not finding the Terra Australis, little ean be
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A925.4    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 4 (1816)   Text
them carrying burthens, and others for whose release ransom was expected. Among the latter were many women and children. These poor creatures were designedly caused to suffer extreme hunger and thirst, and kept under apprehensions of being carried to Jamaica to be sold as slaves, that they might the more earnestly endeavour to procure money to be brought for their ransom. When some of the women, upon their knees and in tears, begged of Morgan to let them return to their families, his answer to
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A925.5    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 5 (1817)   Text
Islanders. III. 295. Beauchesne, M. de, his voyage to the South Sea. IV. 375-383. In (lie Strait of Ma- galhanes. 376. At the Galapagos Islands. 381. Island discovered by him. 382. Beauchesnes Island, discovered. IV. 382. Represented by M. Frezier as two Islands. 383. Seen bv Woodes Rogers. 460. Seen in 1810 by Captain Lindsay. V. 37. Beeston, Sir William, Governor of Jamaica. Proclamation issued by him. V. 175. Begeer, Jacob, Surgeon in the Nassau Fleet. Accused of killing his patients designedly
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A925.5    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 5 (1817)   Text
near California. I. 178. Pernety, Dom. Naturalist in M. de Bougainville's voyage to the Malouines, and author of a narrative of the expedition. V. 143. Accused by Falkner of designedly giving too favourable a description of the Malouines. 151. Pernicious Islands. See Schaadelyk. Perouse, de la, came on the Banks of Formosa, without previous knowledge of their existence. III. 431. Peru. Whence the name derived. I. 120. Peruvian Sheep. I. 333-4. III. 122. Peruvian Wine, compared to Madeira. IV
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A142    Book:     Paley, W. 1809. Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of the Deity. 12th edition London: Printed for J. Faulder.   Text
things beforehand, which are not to be used until a considerable time afterwards; for this implies a contemplation of the future, which belongs only to intelligence.Of these prospective contrivances, the bodies of animals furnish various examples.I. The human teeth afford an instance, not only of prospective contrivance, but of the completion of the contrivance being designedly suspended. They are formed within the gums, and there they stop: the fact being, that their further advance to maturity
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
CHAP. XXXIV. thers, and thus rendered arrow-proof. The women were decently clad: adultery in the female was punished with death, and also the crime of procuring abortion, so commonly practised among other tribes; here it was supposed to bring a mortal plague upon the settlement wherein it was committed, .. a belief which not improbably may have been designedly inculcated. When a guest arrived whom they desired to honour, the women spread before him a large cotton cloth; they had the virtue of
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A710.02    Beagle Library:     Mariner, William. 1817. An account of the natives of the Tonga Islands in the South Pacific Ocean. 2 vols. London: printed for the author. Volume 2.   Text
whom they belong. We shall now explain how these different individuals come to attach themselves to a particular chief. We will suppose that the present king or any other great chief has a son six or seven years of age, his playmates are the sons of the inferior chiefs, matabooles, and mooas of his father's establishment, who freely associate with him, accompany him upon excursions, and imitate, in many respects, the habits of their parents: he does not, however, designedly play the chief, and
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A597.4    Beagle Library:     Humboldt, Alexander von. 1819-1829. Personal narrative of travels to the equinoctial regions of the New Continent, during the years 1799-1804. By Alexander de Humboldt, and Aimé Bonpland; with maps, plans, &c. written in French by Alexander de Humboldt, and trans. into English by Helen Maria Williams. 7 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown. Volume 4.   Text
heteronymous pole. The southern temperate zone has it's winter, while it rains to the North of the equator; and while a mean heat prevails from 5 to 6 greater than in the time of drought, when the * I have in this discussion designedly excluded the uncertain hypotheses, founded on the combinations of oxygen and hydrogen, and on the property attributed to electricity of forming and precipitating vesicular vapours. [page] 41
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A731.01    Beagle Library:     Scoresby, William. 1820. An account of the Arctic regions, with a history and description of the northern whale-fishery. 2 vols. Edinburgh: Archibald Constable and Hurst, Robinson and Co. Volume 1.   Text
four published journals of persons having wintered by accident or design in this desolate region, together with the interesting information already alluded to, received by Colonel Beaufoy from those Russian adventurers, who not unfrequently resort hither and remain throughout the winter, for the purposes of hunting and fishing. From these sources of information, I am enabled to give the following sketch of the progress of the seasons. It is, however, designedly brief, as the climate of the
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A731.02    Beagle Library:     Scoresby, William. 1820. An account of the Arctic regions, with a history and description of the northern whale-fishery. 2 vols. Edinburgh: Archibald Constable and Hurst, Robinson and Co. Volume 2.   Text
upon a fish, in point of equity the right of another. But any one who is the original striker of a whale, must, undoubtedly, condemn him who designedly interferes, and must esteem the act of intentionally anticipating his boats, as little better than a robbery. From the second law, a fish may alternately become the property of several persons, each of whose claim immediately ceases, the moment he loses possession. [page] 32
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A761.12    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. Volume 12: Mollusca and Radiata.   Text
a very lively manner. The spondyli, and a considerable number of pectines present examples of this. We must then admit here that one lobe of the mantle, not receiving the exciting action of the light, does not produce any coloured pigmentum, while the reverse is the case with the other; or, to express ourselves with more precision, the pigmentum is coloured by this action alone; so that if one of those shells should be designedly reversed there would be a reverse in the coloration of the valves
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A761.13    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. Volume 13: Annelida, Crustacea, and Arachnida.   Text
more downy and soft, where the sacs of eggs, and the young ones newly disclosed, are to be shut up. Although the external cap or pavilion is designedly, without doubt, more or less soiled by foreign bodies, which serve to conceal its presence, the apartment of the industrious fabricator is always scrupulously clean. The pouches which enclose the eggs are four, five, or even six, for each habitation, which, nevertheless, forms but a single habitation. These pouches are of a lenticular form, and
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A549.1    Beagle Library:     Ellis, William. 1829. Polynesian researches, during a residence of nearly six years on the South Sea Islands, including descriptions of the natural history and scenery of the islands-with remarks on the history, mythology, traditions, government, arts, manners, and customs of the inhabitants. 2 vols. London: Fisher, Son & Jackson. Volume 1   Text   Image
the plantation destroyed, or the few plants that remained were so much injured as to be nearly useless. Great as was the loss experienced on this occasion, they had reason to fear it was caused by some of their neighbours, who had designedly set fire to the long dry grass immediately to windward of the plantation. This was probably done from motives of jealousy, lest, by cultivating the land, and reaping the fruits of it, the Missionaries should suppose it had become theirs, and the natives cease
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A914    Book:     Lawrence, John. 1829. The horse in all his varieties and uses. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green.   Text
injuries of hard labour are most apparent in those parts. A survey of the other side of the horse, concludes the stable examination. Suffer no person belonging to the seller to be with you in the stall (unless you know and are well satisfied with the dealer's character) during your inspection, that the horse may not be rendered unquiet, either designedly, or at the mere presence of a habitual tormentor. A short time since I had occasion to examine a horse, for a friend, at the stable of a
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A805    Beagle Library:     Mackintosh, James. 1830. The history of England. London: Lardner (Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopaedia). Volume 1.   Text
though perhaps strained sense of being intended only for allodial possessors. The latter class seem too inconsiderable to have been the object of such a provision; yet it is, on the other hand, repugnant to all rules of construction, whether founded in reason or in law, to comprehend sovereigns under a vague description, in a decree where their inferiors only are expressly named. The most probable solution of the difficulty is, that the description was made designedly ambiguous, in order that it
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A805    Beagle Library:     Mackintosh, James. 1830. The history of England. London: Lardner (Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopaedia). Volume 1.   Text
sheriffs might nominate the members, it appears reasonable to interpret the words as importing that all freeholders present should vote, whether they were duly summoned or designedly unwarned, and whatever the mode of summons in these beginnings of parliament may have been. In the first year of Henry V., knights, citizens, and burgesses were required to be resident in the places where they are elected; and under Henry VI. the important alteration was made which restricted the right of suffrage to
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A901    Beagle Library:     Duncan, John Shute. 1831. Analogies of organized beings. Oxford: S.Collingwood.   Text
of nature with the ends she has in view. Art and means, says Baxter, (Inquiry into the Nature of the Human Soul, vol. i. p. 136, 3d ed.) are designedly multiplied that we might not take it (in the order of creation) for the effect of chance: and in some cases themethod itself is different, that we might see it is not the effect of surd necessity. [page] 2
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A909    Beagle Library:     Herschel, John Frederick William. 1831. A preliminary discourse on the study of natural philosophy. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green and John Taylor.   Text
hydrogen: but there are almost certain indications that this exception is not a real one, but assumes that appearance in consequence of some modifying cause not understood. (156.) 7th, If we can either find produced by nature, or produce designedly for ourselves, two instances which agree exactly in all but one particular, and differ in that one, its influence in producing the phenomenon, if it have any, must thereby be rendered sensible. If that particular be present in one instance and wanting
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
IND STRIA, sf. 1. Industry, diligence, assiduity 2. Ingenuity, subtilty, acuteness. De Ind stria, Designedly, purposely, intentionally INDUSTRI L, a. Belonging to industry. INDUSTRI R, va. To teach, to instruct. INDUSTRIOSAM NTE, ad. 1. Industriously. 2. Designedly. INDUSTRI SO, SA, a. 1. Industrious, skilful, dexterous. 2. Subtle, crafty, cunning. INE INEBRI R, va. 1. (Ant.) To inebriate, to make drunk. 2. (Met.) To intoxicate; applied to violent commotions of the mind. INEBRIAT VO, VA, a
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
. Unseasonable, not suitable to the time of the year or occasion. INTENCI N, sf. 1. Intention, design. 2. Instinct of brutes. Hombre de intencion, A dissembler. INTENCIONADAM NTE, ad. Designedly. INTENCION DO, DA, a. Inclined, disposed. INTENCION L, a. Intentional, designed; done by design. INTENCIONALM NTE, ad. Intentionally. INTEND NCIA, sf. 1. Administration, management. 2. Place, employment, or district of an intendant. INTEND NTA, sf. Lady of an intendant. INTEND NTE, sm. Intendant, an officer
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
. Prodigality, extravagance. P RDIDA, sf. 1. Loss, detriment, damage. 2. Quantity or thing lost. De perdida, In a hazardous perilous manner. PERDIDAM NTE, ad. Desperately, furiously; uselessly. PERDID ZO, ZA, a. Lost designedly or on purpose. Hacerse perdidizo, To lose designedly at cards, as gamesters do at times. PERD DO, DA, a. Lost, strayed, misguided. Gente perdida, Vagrants, vagabonds. Muger perdida, Prostitute. PERDID SO, SA, a. Sustaining loss. PERDIG NA, sf. (Arag.) A young partridge. PERDIG
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
, ad. 1. Against the grain. 2. Contrary to the natural order. AP STA Y APOSTADAM NTE, ad. Designedly, on purpose. APOSTAD RO, sm. 1. A place where soldiers or other persons are stationed. 2. (Na t.) A station for ships. APOSTAD R, sm. Bettor, one that wagers. APOST L, sm. (Ast.). A convenient fishing place in a river. APOSTAL OS, sm. pl. Planks from 5 to 7 inches thick. APOST R, va. 1. To bet, to lay a wager. 2. To distribute horses on the road to relieve others, to place relays. 3. To post
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
, ZA, a. Ready to fall, being of short duration, or little consistence. Hacer caediza una cosa, To let a thing fall designedly. Peras caedizas, Pears dropping from the tree. CAED RA, sf. (Among Weavers) Loose threads dropping from the weaver's loom when weaving. CA R, vn. 1. To fall to the ground, to tumble down. Caer plomo, To fall flat. 2. To lose one's situation, fortune, or influence. 3. To fall into an error or danger. 4. (Met.) To deviate from the right road, or to take the wrong one. 5. (Met
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
ldas, Back or back part: (Met.) Aid, protection. A' las espaldas de la iglesia, At the back part of the church. A' espaldas. At one's back, in one's absence. A' espaldas vueltas. Treacherously, behind one's back. Echar las espaldas, To forget designedly, to abandon. Sobre mis espaldas, At my expense. ESPALD R, sm. 1. Back-piece of an armour, shoulder-piece of a coat of mail. 2. Place where one puts his back to rest against. 3. Espalier in gardens. Espald res, Pieces of tapestry against which the
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
out. 2. To express, to declare clearly and distinctly. EXPROBRACI N, sf. Exprobration, reproachful accusation or censure. EX PROF SO, ad. Lat. Avowedly, designedly, on purpose. EXPROVINCI L, sm. Ex-provincial, a late provincial. EXPUGNACI N, sf. Expugnation. EXPUGNAD R, sm. He who takes by assault. EXPUGN R, va. To conquer, to reduce a place by force of arms. EXPULS R, va. To expel, to eject. EXPULSI N, sf. Expulsion, the act of driving out. EXPULS VO, VA, a. Expulsive. EXPULTR Z, a. That which
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
. Young asphodel. GAMON SO, SA, a. Abounding in asphodels. GAM NO, NA, a. Applied to the skins of deer. GAM ZA, sf. 1. Chamois. Antelope rupicapra L. 2. Chamois, or Chamois leather. GAMUZ DO, DA, a. Chamois colour. GAN G NA, sf. 1. Appetite, keenness of stomach; hunger. 2. A healthy disposition of the body. 3. Inclination, desire. De gana, Designedly. De su gana, Voluntarily. De buena mala gana, With pleasure, or with reluctance. GAN DA, sf. Act of gaining or winning. GANADER A, sf. Stock of cattle
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
olvido, To forget designedly, to cast in oblivion. O'MBLA, sf. (Ict.) Crow-fish. Sci na umbra L. OMBLIG DA, sf. Part corresponding to the navel, in skins. OMBL GO, sm. 1. Centre or middle of a thing. 2. Navel-string. 3. Navel, the point in the middle of the belly by which embryos communicate with the parent. Ombligo de Venus, Venus navel-wort. Cynoglossum lusitanicum L. OMBLIGU RO, sm. Bandage put upon the navel of new-born children. OMBR A, sf. Shade, place secluded from the sun. OM GA, sf
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
. PENS DO, DA, a. Deliberate, premeditated. De pensado, On purpose, designedly. PENSAMI NTO, sm. 1. Thought, idea; meditation, contemplation. 2. Resolution, design. 3. Great swiftness or promptitude. En un pensamiento, In a trice. PENS R, vn. 1. To think, to consider, to reflect; to take into serious consideration; to weigh maturely. 2. To feed cattle. Sin pensur, Unexpectedly, thoughtlessly. Pens que, (Vulg.) I thought so or as much. PENSAT VO, VA, a. 1. Pensive, thoughtful. 2. (Joc.) Applied to
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
or place where the post-horses are stationed. 3. Post, distance from one relay or post-house to another. 4. Military post; a sentinel. 5. Chop, a piece of meat or fish cut off to be dressed. 6. Slug, a piece of lead cut off from a larger piece, but not round. 7. Night-sentry. 8. Stake, money staked at a game of cards. sm. Person who rides or travels post. Correr la posta, To travel post. A' posta, Designedly. Por la posta, With all speed, in haste. POST R, va. To bet, to wager, to stake. P STE
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A827    Beagle Library:     Seoane, Mateo. 1831. Neuman and Baretti's dictionary of the Spanish and English Languages. 5th ed. 2 vols. London: n.p. Volume 1: Spanish and English.   Text
, colour; dye. 2. A dyer's shop. 3. Palliation, cloak, colour. TINT RO, sm. Inkhorn, inkstand. Dexarse en el tintero, To forget or omit designedly. Qued rse uno en el tintero, (Fam.) To entirely forget a thing. TINT LLO, sm. 1. A light-coloured wine. Tintillo de rota, A deep-coloured sweetish wine. 2. A despicable dolt. TINTIRINT N, sm. Echo or sound of a trumpet or other sharp sounding musical instrument. T NTO, TA, a. Deep-coloured; applied to wine. V. Te ido. Vino tinto, Red wine. TINTORER A, sf. A
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A276    Book:     Herschel, John Frederick William. 1840. A preliminary discourse on the study of natural philosophy. Part of Dionysius Lardner's Cabinet cyclopædia. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green; John Taylor.   Text   Image
hydrogen: but there are almost certain indications that this exception is not a real one, but assumes that appearance in consequence of some modifying cause not understood. (156.) 7th, If we can either find produced by nature, or produce designedly for ourselves, two instances which agree exactly in all but one particular, and differ in that one, its influence in producing the phenomenon, if it have any, must thereby be rendered sensible. If that particular be present in one instance and wanting
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A13    Review:     Jackson, 1842. [Review of] The Structure and Distribution of Coral Reefs: Being the First Part of the Geology of the Voyage of the 'Beagle,' under the Command of Capt. FitzRoy, R. N., during the Years 1832 to 1836. Journal of the Royal Geographical Society of London. 12: 115-120.   Text
their formation; and is, like Chapter V., of the greatest interest to all who would study the details of the earth's superficial structure.* The subject of this * We use the term superficial designedly, considering, as we do, all comprised between the limits of our highest mountains and our deepest soundings in the ocean as forming but a thin pellicle of our globe, compared with its diameter and mass. [page] 11
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A33    Book:     Combe, George. 1847. The Constitution of Man and Its Relation to External Objects. Edinburgh: Maclachlan, Stewart, & Co., Longman & Co.; Simpkin, Marshall, & Co., W. S. Orr & Co., London, James M'Glashan, Dublin.   Text
quence, of reaping numberless enjoyments that appear destined for him by his Creator, and avoiding thousands of miseries that now render life too often only a series of calamities! The views here expounded also harmonize with the principle maintained in a former part of this work : that, as activity in the faculties is the fountain of enjoyment, the whole constitution of nature is designedly framed to support them in that state. What scope for observation, reflection, exercise of the moral
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A33    Book:     Combe, George. 1847. The Constitution of Man and Its Relation to External Objects. Edinburgh: Maclachlan, Stewart, & Co., Longman & Co.; Simpkin, Marshall, & Co., W. S. Orr & Co., London, James M'Glashan, Dublin.   Text
, adds, But can you persuade mankind thus? I mean, can you give them a practical conviction ? I answer, In the present unsatisfactory condition of things, the experiment is, at least, worth the trying, with a view to investing the ordinary course of Providence with that degree of sanctity and reverence which can be conferred on it only by treating it as designedly calculated to instruct, benefit, and delight the whole faculties of man. If the constitution and arrangements of nature in which our
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A33    Book:     Combe, George. 1847. The Constitution of Man and Its Relation to External Objects. Edinburgh: Maclachlan, Stewart, & Co., Longman & Co.; Simpkin, Marshall, & Co., W. S. Orr & Co., London, James M'Glashan, Dublin.   Text
unsatisfactory condition of things, the experiment is, at least, worth the trying; not with a view to questioning the importance of Scripture teaching; but for the purpose of communicating to its precepts in relation to practical conduct in this world, a basis also in nature, and investing the ordinary course of providence within that degree of sanctity and reverence which can be conferred on it only by treating it as designedly calculated to instruct, benefit, and delight, the whole faculties of
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A50    Review:     [Gray, Asa]. 1860. Review of Darwin's theory on the origin of species by means of natural selection. American Journal of Science and Arts. (Ser. 2) 29 (March): 153-184.   Text   Image
we trust implies that all was done wisely, in the largest sense designedly, and by an Intelligent First Cause. The contemplation of the subject on the intellectual side, the amplest exposition of Unity of Plan in Creation, considered irrespective of natural agencies, leads to no other conclusion. We are thus, at last, brought to the question; what would happen if the derivation of species were to be substantiated, either as a true physical theory, or as a sufficient hypothesis? What would come of
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A53    Review:     Hopkins, William. 1860. Physical Theories of the Phenomena of Life. Fraser's Magazine. 61 (June): 739-752; 62 (July): 74-90.   Text   Image
Vestiges attracted a large share of public attention, and is now almost as much forgotten as Lamarck's. Mr. Darwin's is unquestionably of the same kind. The history of those which have preceded it appears to us to be ominous of its future destiny. In our preceding remarks we have designedly restricted ourselves as much as possible to those parts of the subject which have a more or less immediate reference to the theories discussed, as physical theories. Lamarck's work and the Vestiges are a
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A565    Review:     DuBois Henry A. 1866. Analysis of Darwin, Huxley and Lyell: being a critical examination of the views of these authors in regard to the origin and antiquity of man. Republication from the American Quarterly Church Review. [No place]: Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor.   Text   Image
THE ORIGIN AND ANTIQUITY OF MAN. PART I. DARWIN'S ORIGIN OF SPECIES. THREE works have been recently presented to the English and American public, emanating from authors of distinguished scientific attainments, and purporting to treat of subjects purely scientific, but which, whether designedly or not, are well calculated to sap the foundations of revealed truth. The first of these works, published in 1860, is, The Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, by Charles Darwin, M. A
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A609    Review:     Anon. 1868. Darwin and pangenesis. Quarterly Journal of Science 5 (July): 295-313.   Text   Image
ox was not designed with a view to its being fattened for man's use: this application was an accidental one. In like manner, and with still greater force, it may be added that the refuse of oil seeds, known as cattle-cake, has been accidentally applied to the fattening of the ox, for the husk and exhausted tissue were designed for a different purpose. And so the whole scheme of Providence would vanish, and natural forces, divinely and designedly guided, would give place to a beautiful, well
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A609    Review:     Anon. 1868. Darwin and pangenesis. Quarterly Journal of Science 5 (July): 295-313.   Text   Image
matters, still we find in the mass of evidence already advanced by him, both designedly, with a view to establish his theory, and unconsciously in his descriptions of natural phenomena, such ample proofs of the production of new species by modified descent, that we are surprised any thinking person should still adhere to a doctrine which has only theological prejudices and long-established ignorance to support it. And as to the provisional hypothesis of pangenesis, it is theoretically and
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A576    Pamphlet:     Wright, Chauncey. 1871. Darwinism: Being an examination of Mr. St. George Mivart's 'Genesis of species,' [Reprinted from the 'North American Review,' July 1871, with additions.] London: John Murray. 46pp.   Text   Image
vitiates nearly all speculations in theoretical biology, which are not designedly, or even instinctively, as in Mr. Darwin's work, made to conform to the rigorous rules of experimental philosophy. These require us to assume no causes that are not true or phenominally known, and known in some other way than in the effect to be explained; and to prove the sufficiency of those we do assume in some other way than by putting an abstract name or description of an effect for its cause, like using the
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F1416    Book contribution:     [Extracts from Darwin's notes throughout.] 1882. In Romanes, G. J., Animal intelligence. London: Kegan Paul Trench & Co.   Text   Image   PDF
I happened to make myself in the first instance are designedly omitted, and these I shall therefore now supply. I bought at a toy-shop a very good imitation of a monkey, and brought it into the room with the real monkey, stroking and speaking to it as if it were alive. The monkey evidently mistook the figure for a real animal, manifesting intense curiosity, mixed with much alarm if I made the figure approach him. Even when I placed the figure upon a table, and left it standing motionless, the
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F1416    Book contribution:     [Extracts from Darwin's notes throughout.] 1882. In Romanes, G. J., Animal intelligence. London: Kegan Paul Trench & Co.   Text   Image   PDF
designedly, for it seemed that faculties fully on a par with human reason would be required for such an exploit if done intentionally. I therefore rearranged things, tying the string where it had been bitten, But the result was exactly the same for three successive occasions, as I could plainly see by the footprints; and what is most singular of all, each time the brute was careful to cut the line a little back of where it had been tied before, as if actually reasoning with himself that even the
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