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A762    Beagle Library:     Dampier, William. 1697. A new voyage round the world. London: James Knapton.   Text
they lay their Eggs, and seldom come among any other Turtle. These and all other Turtle lay Eggs in the Sand in N. lat. their time of laying is in May, June, July, in S. lat. about Christmas, some being sooner some later: They lay three times in a season, and at each time 80 or 90 Eggs. Their Eggs are as big as a Hens Egg, and very round, covered only with a white tough skin. There are some Bays on the North side of Jamaica, where these Hawksbills resort to lay. In the Bays of Honduras are Islands
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A924    Beagle Library:     Phillip, Arthur. 1789. The voyage of Governor Phillip to Botany Bay: with an account of the establishment of the colonies of Port Jackson & Norfolk Island, compiled from authentic papers which have been obtained from the several departments to which are added, the journals of Lieuts. Shortland, Watts, Ball, & Capt. Marshall with an account of their new discoveries, embellished with fifty five copper plates, the maps and charts taken from actual surveys, & the plans & views drawn on the spot, by Capt. Hunter, Lieuts. Shortland, Watts, Dawes, Bradley, Capt. Marshall, &tc. London: John Stockdale   Text
Variable. Fresh gales and cloudy, with thick small rain. Passed through a large quantity of red spawn. 1787. Dec. 41 29 80 47 25 15 S. S. W. Moderate and clear. 15, Noon. 16 41 41 83 28 23 14 Variable. Ditto, and cloudy. A number of seals about. 17 41 41 87 19 Variable. Fresh breezes and cloudy. Saw some rock-weed. 18 41 44 91 04 Ditto. Fresh gales and cloudy. 19 41 38 94 29 S. W. Ditto, with squalls and rain. A number of Port Egmont hens about. Passed a large patch of rock-weed. 20 41 38 98 04
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A719.01    Beagle Library:     Thunberg, Carl Peter. 1795-6. Travels in Europe, Africa and Asia, performed between the years 1770 and 1779. 4 vols. London: W. Richardson and J. Egerton. vol. 1.   Text
them. These eggs sold in general for a skelling a piece, or about sixpence English. They are fittest, and most used for cakes and ufs perdus; and they are particularly good, when eaten with a large quantity of butter. One single egg is sufficient for several people. And whereas hens eggs will seldom keep for any length of time on board of ship, and require great pains to be taken with them in order to turn them every day, ostriches eggs are easily preserved at sea, on account of their size
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A925.1    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 1 (1803)   Text
daughter of the King of Zolo, who one day described to her husband two pearls of extraordinary size that were in her father's possession. The King of Borneo conceived a passionate desire to obtain them, and went with 500 vessels full of armed men to Zolo, where he seized on his father-in-law, and several of his family, whose release could no otherwise be obtained than by the delivery of the admired pearls. These pearls were said to be 'as large as hens eggs, and so perfectly round, that when
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A925.5    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 5 (1817)   Text
Islands. V. 12. Sondergrondt Island, discovered by Schouten and le Maire. II. 378. Natives. 379-381. Situation. 453. Sonrol, or Sonsorol, an Island near the Pelew Islands. Two Missionary Fathers landed there. V. 14. 23. Sooloo Islands, Pearl fishery there. I. 94. Pearls as large as hen's eggs. ib. Soon, Don Alonso, a native of Guahan, sent in search of the Island Carolina. III. 307. V. 5. Sotomayor, Don Alonzo de. II. 46. 51. Sound, la, a Buccaneer; attempts to cross the Isthmus of Darien. IV
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A556.1    Beagle Library:     Ulloa, Antonio de. 1806. A voyage to South America: describing at large the Spanish cities, towns, provinces, &c. on that extensive continent. 4th ed. 2 vols. London: John Stockdale, R. Faulder, Longman, Lackington and J. Harding. vol. 1.   Text   Image
placing the eggs on the nopal, when, if any motion is perceived, it is a sufficient indication that the animalcule has life, though the egg is so minute as hardly to be perceived; and this is the seed placed on the foliage of the nopal, and the quantity contained in the shell of a hen's egg is sufficient for covering a whole plant. It is remarkable that this insect does not, or at least in any visible manner, injure the plant; but extracts its nourishment from the most succulent juice, which it sucks
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A556.1    Beagle Library:     Ulloa, Antonio de. 1806. A voyage to South America: describing at large the Spanish cities, towns, provinces, &c. on that extensive continent. 4th ed. 2 vols. London: John Stockdale, R. Faulder, Longman, Lackington and J. Harding. vol. 1.   Text   Image
greatly less. When pregnant, its belly swells to an enormous size; and indeed they often lay sixty eggs at a time, each of which is as large as those of a pigeon. These are reckoned a great dainty, not only at Panama, but in other parts where this creature is found. These eggs are all inclosed in a long, fine membrane, and form a kind of string. The flesh of this animal is exceedingly white, and universally admired by all ranks. I tasted both the flesh and the eggs, but the latter are viscid in
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A556.1    Beagle Library:     Ulloa, Antonio de. 1806. A voyage to South America: describing at large the Spanish cities, towns, provinces, &c. on that extensive continent. 4th ed. 2 vols. London: John Stockdale, R. Faulder, Longman, Lackington and J. Harding. vol. 1.   Text   Image
opinion equally strange is, that the animals from other climates, on their being brought to Porto Bello, cease to procreate. The inhabitants bring instances of hens brought from Panama or Carthagena, which immediately on their arrival grew barren, and laid no more eggs; and even at this very time the horned cattle sent from Panama, after they have been here a short time, lose their flesh so as not to be eatable; though they do not want for plenty of [page] 9
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A793.3    Beagle Library:     Kirby, William and Spence, William. 1815-26. An introduction to entomology. 4 vols. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green. vol. 3.   Text
, pyramidal, square, turban-shaped, pear-shaped, melon-shaped, boat-shaped, of the shape of an ale-stand, of a drum, c.a, and sometimes of shapes so strange and peculiar, that we can scarcely credit their claim to the name of eggs. Thus the eggs of the gnat are oblong and narrow, or nearly cylindrical, having at the top a cylindrical knobb, so as to give them the precise form of the round-bottomed phial sometimes used by chemists: those of the common a Eggs of various shapes are given PLATE XX. FIG
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A793.2    Beagle Library:     Kirby, William and Spence, William. 1815-26. An introduction to entomology. 4 vols. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green. vol. 2.   Text
vitality even after having been frozen into lumps of ice. The eggs of insects are filled with a fluid matter, included in a skin infinitely thinner than that of hens' eggs, which John Hunter found to freeze at about 15 of Fahrenheit. Yet on exposing several of the former, including those of the silkworm, for five hours to a freezing mixture which made Fahrenheit's thermometer fall to 38 below zero, Spallanzani found that they were not frozen, nor their fertility in the slightest degree impaired
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A793.2    Beagle Library:     Kirby, William and Spence, William. 1815-26. An introduction to entomology. 4 vols. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green. vol. 2.   Text
the eggs of insects have usually thinner skins than pup , and yet they are unaffected by a degree of cold much superior. In the present state, then, of our knowledge of animal physiology, we must confess our ignorance of the cause of these phenomena, which seem never to have been sufficiently adverted to by general speculators on the nature of animal heat. We may conjecture, indeed, either that they are owing to some peculiar and varying attraction for caloric inherent in the fluids which
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A793.1    Beagle Library:     Kirby, William and Spence, William. 1815-26. An introduction to entomology. 4 vols. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green. vol. 1.   Text
deemed domestic; and the rein-deer is quite as much so to the Laplander, as our oxen and kine are to us. We learn from Reaumur that the fallow-deer is subject to the attack of two species of gad-fly: one, which like that of the ox, deposits its eggs in an orifice it makes in the skin of the animal, and so produces tumours; and another in imitation of that of the sheep, ovipositing in such a manner that its larv when hatched can make their way into the head, where they take their station in a
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A793.2    Beagle Library:     Kirby, William and Spence, William. 1815-26. An introduction to entomology. 4 vols. London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green. vol. 2.   Text
produce facts in proof of each of these positions; not by any means all that might be adduced, but a few of the most striking that occur to me. First, then, insects often in cases not likely to be provided for by instinct, adopt means evidently designed for effecting their object. A certain degree of warmth is necessary to hatch a hen's eggs, and we give her little credit for reason in sitting upon them for this purpose. But if any one had ever seen a hen make her nest in a heap of fermenting
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A773.02    Beagle Library:     Fleming, John. 1822. The philosophy of zoology; or, A general view of the structure, functions, and classification of animals. 2 vols. Edinburgh: Archibald Constable & Co. vol. 2.   Text
was in the habit of frequenting the nests occasionally. Even after the females were removed, along with their young, he resorted to one of the nests, and continued sitting for several days in succession, scarcely moving away to take food. At length a dozen of hens eggs were put into the nest, and on these he sat regularly until they were hatched. When, however, the young chickens began to make a noise, and to break open the shell, he endeavoured to kill them with his bill, and throw them out
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A751.01    Beagle Library:     Burchell, William John. 1822-4. Travels in the interior of Southern Africa. 2 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown. vol. 1.   Text
their shoulders, and their head just peeping out between the legs which projected before them. All the Hottentots confirmed the fact of those nine eggs which were found on the outside of the nest, being intended as food for the young ostriches; and assured me that the eggs in this nest were the produce of two hens. In the evening we reached the Zak-rivier (Sack-river), the northern boundary of the colony, where we remained stationary the four following days. 31st. This is the principal river
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CUL-DAR242    Note:    1824--1896   Emma Darwin's diary   Text
October 1869 Friday, 22 October 1869 Saturday, 23 October 1869 G. came Lenny October 1869 Sunday, 24 October 1869 G. poorly Monday, 25 October 1869 Tuesday, 26 October 1869 Wednesday, 27 October 1869 Hen to Lidwell Thursday, 28 October 1869 G. went Friday, 29 October 1869 Saturday, 30 October 1869 November 1869 Sunday, 31 October 1869 G. poorly did not go b [line crossed] Monday, 1 November 1869 Went to Q. Anne St Tuesday, 2 November 1869 Wednesday, 3 November 1869 Sylvester Hens G. [Erny] Thursday
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A732.01    Beagle Library:     Stevenson, William Bennet. 1825. A historical and descriptive narrative of twenty years' residence in South America: containing the travels in Arauco, Chile, Peru, and Colombia; with an account of the revolution, its rise, progress, and results. 3 vols. London: Hurst, Robinson & Co.   Text
capons rear a brood much better than hens; and I have seen one of them with upwards of thirty chickens. The hen being thus freed from her brood soon begins to lay eggs again, which is a very great advantage. After an excursion of three weeks, I returned to Conception with my friend, Don Santiago Dias, to whom I brought letters of introduction from my good host at Arauco, Don Nicolas del Rio, which were most willingly attended to, and rendered my detention as a prisoner of war a delightful series of
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A782    Beagle Library:     Head, Francis Bond. 1826. Rough notes taken during some rapid journeys across the Pampas and among the Andes. London: John Murray.   Text
the ponchos, and I afterwards found that many other persons, as well some as hens sitting upon eggs, were also in the hut. In sleeping in these huts, the cock has often hopped upon my back to crow in the morning; however, as soon as it is daylight, everybody gets up. The life of the Gaucho is very interesting, and resembles that beautiful description which Horace gives of the progress of a young eagle: Olim juventas et patrius vigor Nido laborum propulit inscium, Vernique jam nimbis remotis
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
to those whose interest it is to cultivate it, and has little of curiosity or interest attached to it for other persons. The season of laying commences with the hens in the month of February, in cold countries. Having laid eighteen or twenty eggs in succession, they usually stop there, and show an inclination to sit; but by taking away their eggs according as they are laid, the hens will still continue laying. Their fecundity varies in degree; some only lay one egg in three days, others one in
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
their eggs are not good. The second, which may be known by the roughness of the crest and feet, have ceased to lay altogether. After the common hen, that variety which holds the first place in fecundity is the tufted or crested hen, which is more delicate eating than the common hen, because, laying fewer eggs, she grows more fat. Hens are of a lively, petulant, and violent character. They quarrel and fight continually amongst themselves. Their inclinations are sanguinary, and manners barbarous
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
the others have laid all their eggs. Her desire may be satisfied by giving her a hen's egg; but it is an object that all the young turkeys should come out together. When all the females are ready to sit, a barn is got ready, with as many nests as there are females. In each of these nests, placed against the wall, eighteen eggs are to be put. If possible, each turkey-hen should receive those which she herself has laid. The windows of the place should be closed against the light. The barn should
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
April. One male is sufficient for many females in the wild state; in captivity, he receives but three; a greater number would not produce the same advantages as the common hens, as the pheasant is less vigorous than the cock. For breeding with proper effect, the male should be of the preceding year, and the females should be but three years old. Many amateurs cause the eggs of the pheasant to be hatched by hens. In a state of captivity, the young pheasants require much care; the most critical
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
liver. We must be excused from entering into any details respecting them. They only show how far a perverted taste will degrade civilized man, when he makes his intellectual faculties wholly subservient to the uncontrolled requisitions of his animal nature. A brief notice of the modes of hatching chickens artificially, will, however, not be without interest for our readers. When men had tamed those fowls which people our poultry-yards, and succeeded in making hens lay eggs nearly all the year round
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
appears no reason whatever to reject the testimony of these travellers. It is remarkable, that the wild hens of the East Indies do not differ among themselves in the colour of the plumage, like our domestic hens. The females too of the primitive species, all resemble each other individually; this is by no means the case, as is well known, with our domestic hens; the differences between one individual and another sometimes extend even to characteristic attributes, such as the absence of crest, of
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
well constructed roost, placed as near as possible to a coach-house or stable, and, still better, above them, to preserve them from the excessive cold of winter, for hens cannot support great cold, or abundant snow. Humidity, and marshy grounds, intersected by too much stagnant water, are equally injurious to them. The want of proper care in their establishment will soon show itself by the small quantity of eggs, the irregularity of the broods, and the languishing state of the chickens. In large
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
vegetables. The races of hens, to the multiplication of which a preference should be given, are those which furnish eggs most abundantly, and whose flesh is the most delicate. These two advantages, and especially the first, are found in the common hens. It is principally then with this species that the poultry-yard should be peopled. The hens to. be chosen should be of the middle size, of a black or brown colour, of a robust constitution, with a thickish head, lively eyes, pendant crest, and bluish
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
contains the germ of the male. If a little on one side, it is that of the female. The love of liberty, the desire of withdrawing their eggs and young ones from the search of their enemies, and that instinct which brings back hens to their primitive state when they are disposed to fulfil those important functions which [page] 19
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
elapse before any of them can do the same. This fact appears to us almost decisive of the question. It must be allowed, however, that if the artificial mode could be brought to succeed in Europe, it would be very desirable. It is far more productive in Egypt than the natural incubation elsewhere. If it succeeded, there would be no interruption to the laying of hens for the whole season. From various accidents, it happens that more than half the eggs, which are incubated by hens, prove
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
have left us nothing but a few receipts on this subject, so inefficient as not to merit transcription. Under the reign of Augustus, Livia, the wife of that emperor, having heard that a man had succeeded in hatching chickens, by the mere heat of his body, remaining in bed on the eggs, for the same length of time as hens employ in incubation, bethought herself of hatching an egg by keeping it in her bosom. It produced a little cock, with a handsome crest. This circumstance excited great
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
. The cock, cannot, in any wise, be considered as a monogamous bird, any more than any other bird of the order to which he belongs, and which are, all of them, polygamous; this must of necessity be the case, from the vast superabundance of females in all the gallin ; neither can any stress be laid on the sort of priori argument, which he draws from the supposition of the hen's situation in a wild state, and the necessity of her being fed by the cock when sitting on the eggs. There are many species
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
polygamous, in which the hen is obliged occasionally to quit the eggs to seek for food many in which the cock never feeds either her or the young. The facts cited by M. Parmentier, from observation on the domestic cock, appear to us to have as little weight as his hypothesis concerning the wild one. If the cock be observed to scrape straw together, and rub himself in it, it is no more than what cocks and hens continually do, in heaps of dust, c., when they have no thought of incubation, but
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
about four feet. Turkey-hens are far from being as profitable, generally speaking, as our common hens. They have need of stimulating food, to excite them to lay, such as hempseed and buckwheat. They have, however, two broods usually in the year, of about fifteen eggs, often less, especially in northern climates. The eggs are white, with some small spots of reddish yellow. The young ones on coming forth from the egg are very weak, and most assiduous care is requisite for the preservation of their
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A761.06    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 6: Aves (1).   Text
of Nature in all cases; but in truth it must be the infallible result of the peculiar constitution and regimen of animals. Those which derive their subsistence from the vegetable kingdom must naturally be more numerous as their food is more plentiful; and the smaller races more especially so as each individual consumes a smaller quantity. Hens often lay infecundated eggs which the Romans called ova subventanea and the Greeks because they imagined them to be produced by the influence of the
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
hens which are too fat do not lay so many eggs, and the shell of the latter is so soft that there is a risk of their being broken in incubation. The enclosures should have a southern aspect, and be defended on the northern side by a wood, or high wall. Pheasants lay towards the end of April; it is then necessary to collect the eggs every evening, for otherwise they would be often broken or devoured by the hens themselves. About eighteen of them may be put under a common hen, of which a trial
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A761.07    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 7: Aves (2).   Text
others lived, and became perfectly accustomed to the climate. They laid eggs at all seasons; and the broods became more frequent and more productive, in the course of time; and in the end much fewer were lost. The number of eggs in the nest used to vary, six having been together at a time; and these maccaws were seen to bring up four young ones at once. These eggs took from twenty to twenty-five days to be hatched, like those of our common hens. Their form was that of a pear, a little flatted, and
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A761.09    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 9: Reptilia.   Text
, that the eggs inside the tortoise are very numerous, and adhere around a membrane in each of the ovaries. They are, as in hens, unequal, and proportioned to the epoch of their first development; but those which are fecundated soon acquire a similarity of bulk. They come out by the same aperture. One would imagine, from the heavy form of the tortoises, and the want of vivacity in their motions, that their growth was slow. Nevertheless, some facts seem to prove that it is rapid. There is a story
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A761.17    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 17.   Text
, that the eggs inside the tortoise are very numerous, and adhere around a membrane in each of the ovaries. They are, as in hens, unequal, and proportioned to the epoch of their first development; but those which are fecundated soon acquire a similarity of bulk. They come out by the same aperture. One would imagine, from the heavy form of the tortoises, and the want of vivacity in their motions, that their growth was slow. Nevertheless, some facts seem to prove that it is rapid. There is a story
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A761.06    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 6: Aves (1).   Text
only according to the species but also the degree of temperature which the eggs undergo. Cold will retard and heat accelerate the coming forth of the young. The eggs of the tomtit take but eleven days in hatching; those of the pigeon eight-and-twenty; hens have twenty-one and many of the scolopaces and palmipedes from twenty-eight to thirty. It is said that the eggs of the mergus serrator (Lath.) take even fifty-seven days. It is well known that eggs may be hatched by artificial heat. That the
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
between the laying of each egg. When they are taken away, according as they have been laid, the entire brood will amount to eight or twelve. In the wild state, as we have seen, they are much more numerous. The eggs are of the bulk and form of goose-eggs, of a fulvous white, with spots or points of a deeper hue. The pea-hens are not very assiduous in hatching, and often quit their eggs to fly to some elevated place. The best plan, therefore, is to have those eggs hatched by a hen-turkey, which can
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
Turkeys are polygamous, and a single cock suffices for twelve or fifteen females. These females will serve for about five years, but the hens of two and three years old hatch the most assiduously. Those of but one year do not pay sufficient attention to their brood. The strongest and largest should always be chosen for this purpose. It happens more frequently with them than with hens that the eggs are sterile. In the cold parts of Europe, the female turkey has but one brood in the year, which
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
of their own species, in whose possession they see any food, a fact, moreover, of which we are constant eye-witnesses in other species, such as sparrows, hens, c.; but this is widely different from the attacks and combats of ferocious animals. It is especially during hurricanes that the gulls are exposed to all the horrors of famine. Mauduyt has made some interesting observations on them at Naples, during a tempest The gulls which dropped some time on the water, were too light to be submerged
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A761.02    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 2: Mammalia (2)   Text
. Quad. 302. Almost as large as a cat, with fur mingled with black and white; the ears equally divided between white and black, and the head almost entirely white. Inhabits the whole of America; comes by night into the frequented places to attack hens, eat their eggs, c. Their young ones, sometimes sixteen in number, do not weigh above a single grain at their birth, Although blind and almost unformed, they find the teat by [page] 6
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A761.06    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 6: Aves (1).   Text
at their head and in a separate group The Rock MANAKINS (RUPICOLA) which are large and bear on their heads a double vertical crest of feathers arranged like a fan. The adult males of the two known species are of the finest orange and the young of an obscure brown. These birds live on fruits scratch the earth like hens and make their nests with dry wood in the deep caverns of the rocks. The female lays two eggs. They are confined to South America. Rock Manakin or Hoopoe Hen. Pipra Rupicola Lin
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
purposes, did not withdraw them to fulfil the object of their destiny. This object is simply to eat, drink, and sleep, that they may get fat as soon as possible. How many men, without being in the same situation, have no other object or business in existence? A singular experiment has been tried with capons, in France, according to M. Parmentier, to make them perform the office of hens, in conducting chickens, and even in hatching eggs. For this purpose a stout and vigorous capon is chosen, his
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
sweetish taste, and sooner satiate the appetite. The inhabitants of the Cape make with these eggs a sort of p tes, or puddings, and omelettes. As their shell is very thick, they can be very well preserved on board ship, where the eggs of hens very soon grow musty. Drinking cups are made with the shell, which hardens with time, and assumes some resemblance to ivory. When the Nasamones, inhabitants of Lybia, went to war, their defensive arms were made of the skin of the ostrich, which is very thick, and
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A761.09    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 9: Reptilia.   Text
, however, it must be observed, that there is nothing but contradiction among authors. The eggs of tortoises are more or less round according to their species, and they have a white and a yolk. Their envelope is more or less calcareous, but never so much so as that of die eggs of birds, and it is often soft. They are cooked in the same manner as those of hens, and their flavour is not inferior, though the white does not harden so easily. They are in great request in those countries in which
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A761.15    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 15: Insecta (2).   Text
entrance, and swallow many. Several birds, such as sparrows, swallows, the kingfisher, hens, c. are partial to these insects. Foxes sometimes turn the hives over in the winter to get at the honey. Ants penetrate into the habitation of the bees, being very fond of honey, and even occasionally attack the eggs. The odour which exhales from some species is very disagreeable to the bees. The death's head sphinx, when it enters the hive, occasions great confusion there, and causes many bees to perish
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A761.17    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 17.   Text
, however, it must be observed, that there is nothing but contradiction among authors. The eggs of tortoises are more or less round according to their species, and they have a white and a yolk. Their envelope is more or less calcareous, but never so much so as that of the eggs of birds, and it is often soft. They are cooked in the same manner as those of hens, and their flavour is not inferior, though the white does not harden so easily. They are in great request in those countries in which
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
. The disposition of the hoccos, born and brought up in domestication, may more particularly be compared to the mild and peaceable nature of our cocks and hens. They are equally fond of being in the neighbourhood of man, and seem to discover a peculiar relish for his society. They do not betake themselves to solitary places of refuge, but make use of the nests which man provides for them, returning daily to lay their eggs, and hatch there in preference to any other situation. These birds are
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A761.08    Beagle Library:     Cuvier, Georges. 1827-35. The animal kingdom arranged in conformity with its organization. With additional descriptions of all the species hitherto named, and of many not before noticed, by Edward Griffith and others. 16 vols. London: Geo. B. Whittaker. vol. 8: Aves (3).   Text
what they have advanced, until better founded proofs, and more recent observations, shall oblige us to reject it The Jesuit Acosta is the first who assures us that hens existed in Peru before the arrival of the Spaniards, and that they were called, in the language of the country, Talpa, and their eggs Ponta. M. Sonnini thus expresses himself on the subject: Tra [page] 17
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