Show results per page.
Search Help New search
Sort by
Results 1-6 of 6 for « +text:hummingbird »
    Page 1 of 1. Go to page:    
72%
A794.02    Beagle Library:     Kotzebue, Otto von. 1821. A voyage of discovery, into the South Sea and Beering's Straits, for the purpose of exploring a north-east passage, undertaken in the years 1815-1818, at the expense of his highness the chancellor of the empire, Count Romanzoff, in the ship Rurick, under the command of the lieutenant in the Russian imperial navy. Translated by H. E. Lloyd. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown. Volume 2.   Text
hummingbird; and Colonel Warre, on this occasion, told me a very remarkable circumstance, which he frequently witnessed, when he made an excursion into the interior of the country, accompanied by some Hottentots. The Hottentots, who have a very quick sight, try to observe a bee flying home with its honey, and pursue it; but they often would not succeed in following the bee, were they not assisted by the birds above mentioned, which [page] 28
72%
CUL-DAR29.1.A1-A49    Note:    1832.00.00--1833.00.00   [Beagle animal notes] (see also individual entries below)   Text   Image
goes round Picus on ground different rather desert places (no good reason) Icterus with yellow patch? (No good reason) yes Both Furnarii go round — one differs Long billed kind — (No good reason) yes Blancas yes (no good reason) Little owl yes (no good reason) Doves (?) Different Hummingbird dif? Teru teru (no good reason) Pointed tailed Tit-mouse (no good R) goes round Pategonian Furnarius (no good R) Are goatsuckers different yes [illeg] Red throated creeper yes (no reason) do Tufted Tit do
72%
CUL-DAR29.1.A1-A49    Note:    1832.00.00--1833.00.00   [Beagle animal notes] (see also individual entries below)   Text   Image
. Sturnus ruber Mellisuga Kingii, Carracara Little hawk Condor Common sparrow? Thenca to near St of Megallan Small Furnarius to Concepcion dark no. Distance (?). Very many birds common to Chili Plata La Plata (four Furnarii) (two or three icteri) (Thenca) (rusty colour finch on coast) long tailed tit. Sturnus ruber Valparaiso Tierra del Fuego Carrion hawk: Little hawk: Common Sparrow Thrush (Distance ?) Blue Finch Elycolites; little creeper little hummingbird. Sturnus ruber, icterus: black Kilty
54%
A1014.1    Book:     Wallace, A. R. 1876. The geographical distribution of animals; with a study of the relations of living and extinct faunas as elucidating the past changes of the Earth's surface. London: Macmillan & Co. Volume 1.   Text
observed by Mr. Hudson at Buenos Ayres. As in Europe and North America, there are winter and summer visitors, from Patagonia and the tropics respectively. Species of Pyrocephalus, Milvulus, swallows, and a hummingbird, are among the most regular of the summer visitors. They are all insectivorous birds. From Patagonia species of Tœnioptera, Cinclodes, and Centrites, come in winter, with two gulls, two geese, and six snipes and plovers. Five species of swallows appear at Buenos Ayres in spring, some
54%
F1593    Book:     Marchant, James ed. 1916. Alfred Russel Wallace letters and reminiscences. New York: Harper & Brothers.   Text   Image   PDF
CORRESPONDENCE ON BIOLOGY327 Mr. Samuel Waddington to A. R. Wallace 7 Whitehall Gardens, London, S.W. February ig, jgoi. Dear Sir,—I trust you will forgive a stranger (.rouhhiig you with a letter, but a friend has asked me whether, as a matter of fact, Darwin held that all living creatures, descended from one and the same [investor, and thai, the pedigree of a hummingbird and that of a hippopotamus would meet if traced far enough back. Can you tell me whether Darwin did teach this? I should
45%
A86    Periodical contribution:     Sulloway, Frank J. 1982. The Beagle collections of Darwin's finches (Geospizinae). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Zoology Series 43, no. 2: 49-94.   Text   Image   PDF
specimens are Darwin's, they may have been acquired by Gustav Adolph Frank, and then by the Leiden Rijksmuseum, through the agency of John Gould. Gould at one time owned at least four Galapagos specimens collected by Darwin, and these he probably acquired in 1855 at the dispersal of the Zoological Society's Museum. Gould was a shrewd dealer in specimens, always on the lookout for birds that could be sold or exchanged to his advantage. It is said that for many years not a hummingbird arrived in
    Page 1 of 1. Go to page: