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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
the slave population increases. Legislative protection, therefore, not only taxes the people at home, but promotes ruin, misery, and death, in the protected colonies. A free trade in sugar would banish slavery altogether, since competition must induce an economy of labour and capital; i.e., a substitution of free for slave labour. Let us see, then, what is the responsibility of the legislature in this matter. The slave system inflicts an incalculable amount of human suffering, for the sake of
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
in it. Happen what might, he could never submit to be a pauper. He hoped, however, that the days of strong temptation were ever,—that slavery was a perishing system,—a system that must perish ere long under any kind of management. High prices, rich lands, and scarcity of people, in conjunction, he argued, are the only supports of slavery. High prices exhaust lands; so there is a prospect of an end of slavery this way. Moderate prices cause an increase of people; so there is the same prospect this
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
anticipations of ultimate success are strengthened by the effects that already reward his exertions. The results of efforts combined for the accomplishment of these object, though various, have been such as materially to affect some of the most interesting portions of the human race. Their Influence is at the present moment felt among the aborigines of Africa, the victims of colonial slavery, the millions of civilized China and India, the population of the inhospitable regions of Siberia and
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
its extension circumscribes the influence of Protestantism, but because it has always appeared to me one of the most absurd and fatal delusions which the powers of darkness ever invented for the destruction of mankind. Here, for the first time, we came into actual contact with slavery. There are, perhaps, few places where the slaves meet with milder treatment; but it was most distressing, on passing the slave market, to observe the wretched captives there bought and sold like cattle; or to see two
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
army, returning from an expedition of murder and devastation, bring home the men, women, and children of the vanquished, as trophies of their victory. These unhappy beings are reduced to perpetual slavery, or sacrificed to satiate the vengeance of their enemies. On these occasions, little children, whose feeble hands could scarcely hold the knife or dagger, have been initiated in the dreadful work of death, and have seemed to feel delight in stabbing captive children, thus imbruing their infant
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
longer be objects of respect or trust. Thus was idolatry abolished in Tahiti and Eimeo; the idols hurled from the thrones they had for ages occupied; and the remnant of the people liberated from the slavery and delusion in which, by the cunningly devised fables of the priests, and the doctrines of devils, they had been for ages held as in fetters of iron. It is impossible to contemplate the mighty deliverance thus effected, without exclaiming, What hath God Wrought! and desiring, with regard to
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
captain of a vessel, the Indus. whom purposes of commerce led to Tahiti, informed the king that Mr. Gyles's errand to Tahiti was merely experimental; and that, should the attempt to manufacture sugar succeed, individuals from distant countries, possessing influence and large resources, would establish themselves in the islands, and, with an armed force, which he would in vain attempt to oppose, would either destroy the inhabitants, or reduce them to slavery. These alarming statements were
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
infringer of the law being opposed to one another in one sense, while in another they constitute the same party. An injured slave appeals to the law; the law decrees him redress; and the unwilling master, while he cannot set aside the decree, complains —and the complaint, though unjust, is true in fact—that the law intermeddles in the disposal of his private property. This fact brings in another consideration, another instance of the reversal, in the ease of slavery, of all common rules,—that slaves are
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
time. They planned to escape in the night, to take refuge in the woods, and subsist there as well as they could till the search should be over, and they could find their way back to Mr. Bruce's estate, and throw themselves at their master's feet to petition for such an exchange of slaves as would allow them to remain in their old habitation. They had no thought of evading slavery altogether. They had no means of leaving the coast, or of obtaining their freedom within it. The utmost they hoped was
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
which would be natural to them, if they spoke what can be called English at all. If I had believed, as many do, that strong feeling impairs the soundness of reasoning, I should assuredly have avoided the subject of the [vii] following tale, since Slavery is a topic which cannot be approached without emotion. But, convinced as I am, on the contrary, that the reason and the sensibilities are made for co-operation, and perceiving, as I do, that the most stirring eloquence issues from the calmest logic
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
the institution of slavery, yet entertained a deep dislike of the system. More than a third of tile slaves assembled were men and women of the ages most fitted for hard labour, and of the greatest strength of frame that negroes attain ill slavery. These brought with them their hoes and knives, and each a portion of provision for breakfast. Having delivered their vegetables to the women who were to cook their messes, they were marched off to their labour in the coffee-walks. The second gang
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
hand on a plough again, he should feel as much at ease as a prince; for bread itself was hardly worth the slavery of tillage without tools. Another had seen his mother sigh when she looked at the tattered garments of her children and remembered that she had not wherewith to repair the old or make new. Another had observed the captain cast many an anxious look [111] upon the frail walls and slight roofs of their dwellings, and had learned, therefore, to dread a summer tempest or a winter snow
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
has learned, and goes on to learn notwithstanding; and slavery becomes less extensive with the lapse of centuries. In ancient times, a great part of the population of the most polished states was the property of the rest. Those were the days when the lords of the race lived in barbarous, comfortless splendour, and the bulk of the people in extreme hardship;—the days of Greek and Roman slavery. Then came the bondage and villeinage of the Gothic nations,—far more tolerable than the ancient slavery
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CUL-Dar84.2.157    abstract:    [1876][.02.24.after]  
not whether the improvement of the temporal condition of the race shall go on, or whether it shall relapse into barbarism? whether the supports of life, the comforts of home, and the pleasures of society, shall become more scanty or more abundant? whether there shall be increased facilities for the attainment of intellectual good, or whether the old times of slavery and hardship shall return? Is any one indifferent whether famine stalks through the land, laying low the [xvi] helpless and
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A762    Beagle Library:     Dampier, William. 1697. A new voyage round the world. London: James Knapton.   Text
Indians that are free; and at these publick Meetings, when they are in the greatest of their jollity, their Mirth seems to be rather forced than real. Their Songs are very melancholy and doleful; so is their Musick: but whether it be natural to the Indians to be thus melancholy, or the effect of their Slavery, I am not certain: But I have always been prone to believe, that they are then only condoling their Misfortunes, the loss of their Country and Liberties: which altho' these that are now living
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A777    Beagle Library:     Frézier, Amédée François. 1717. A voyage to the South-Sea and along the coasts of Chili and Peru in the years 1712, 1713, and 1714. London: Jonah Bowyer.   Text
in Justinian's Institutes, when the Father is a Servant in Commendam; because the latter being permitted, the Advantage is to accrue to him preferable to the other. The Mixture of Spanish Blood makes those free whom the Father will own; and entitles the Mestices, that is, the Sons of a Spaniard and an Indian Woman, to wear Linnen. To know the Original of this sort of Slavery, we must look back to the Conquest of Peru. The private Persons who are the first Authors, ought, by their Contract With
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A753    Beagle Library:     Byron, John. 1768. The narrative of the Honourable John Byron (Commodore in a late expedition around the world) containing an account of the great distresses suffered by himself and his companions on the coast of Patagonia, from the year 1740, till their arrival in England, 1746. London: S.Baker and G. Leigh, and T. Davies.   Text
slavery, by mere dint of hard usage and punishments, that it appears to me the most absurd thing in the world, that the Spaniards should rely upon these people for assistance upon any emergency. We embarked in the evening, and it was night before we got to the place where we were to be delivered up to the Spanish guard. We were met by three or four officers, and a number of soldiers, all with their spados drawn, who surrounded us as if they had the most formidable enemy to take charge of
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A745    Beagle Library:     Bougainville, Louis Antoine de. 1772. A voyage round the world performed by order of His Most Christian Majesty in the years 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769. Translated by John Reinhold Forster. London: J. Nourse and T. Davies.   Text
tyranny and oppression, we cannot let these sentiments pass unnoticed. It would have appeared to us impossible, that such an idea as this could enter into any man's head who is in his right senses: he wrote down this strange assertion, either being carried away by the itch to say something extraordinary and paradoxical, or in order to make slavery more tolerable to his fellow Frenchmen Slavery endeavours to extirpate and to smother all sentiments of honour, which only can operate in the breast of a
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A745    Beagle Library:     Bougainville, Louis Antoine de. 1772. A voyage round the world performed by order of His Most Christian Majesty in the years 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769. Translated by John Reinhold Forster. London: J. Nourse and T. Davies.   Text
general slavery, and the police which they observe here with regard to the natives, is the same in all their other factories. If one chief forms a plot, another discovers it, and immediately informs the Dutch of it. These moors are, upon the whole, ugly, lazy, and not at all warlike. They are greatly afraid of the Papous, or inhabitants of Papua; who come sometimes in numbers of two or three hundred to burn their habitations, and to carry off all they can, and especially slaves. The remembrance of
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A745    Beagle Library:     Bougainville, Louis Antoine de. 1772. A voyage round the world performed by order of His Most Christian Majesty in the years 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769. Translated by John Reinhold Forster. London: J. Nourse and T. Davies.   Text
three or four guns at her, which she did not attend to. She certainly took us for a Dutch ship, and was afraid of slavery. Almost all the people of this coast are pirates, and the Dutch make slaves of them whenever they take any. Being obliged to abandon the pursuit of this boat, I ordered the Etoile's canoe to sound a-head of us. [page] 40
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A745    Beagle Library:     Bougainville, Louis Antoine de. 1772. A voyage round the world performed by order of His Most Christian Majesty in the years 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769. Translated by John Reinhold Forster. London: J. Nourse and T. Davies.   Text
murder, or carry them into slavery. This evil cannot be remedied: for, how is it possible to conquer a nomadic nation, in an immense uncultivated country, where it would be difficult even to find them: besides, these Indians are brave and inured to hardships; and those times exist no longer, when one Spaniard could put a thousand Indians to flight. Race of robbers, settled on the north side of the river. A set of robbers united into a body, a few years ago, on the north side of the river, and
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A745    Beagle Library:     Bougainville, Louis Antoine de. 1772. A voyage round the world performed by order of His Most Christian Majesty in the years 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769. Translated by John Reinhold Forster. London: J. Nourse and T. Davies.   Text
as an interpreter. The governor appeared in a balcony; he told them, that they were welcome; that they should go to rest themselves, and that he would send them notice of the day which he should fix in order to let them know the king's intentions. He added, in general, that he was come to release them from slavery, and put them in possession of their property, which they had not hitherto enjoyed. They answered by a general cry, lifting up their right hands to heaven, and wishing all prosperity
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A781.02    Beagle Library:     Hawkesworth, John. 1773. An account of the voyages undertaken for making discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere, performed by Commodore Byron, Captain Wallis, Captain Carteret, and Captain Cook in the Dolphin, the Swallow and the Endeavour drawn from the journals which were kept by the several commanders and from the papers of Joseph Banks. 3 vols. London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell. Volume 2.   Text
utterly unknown, live under a regular form of government; yet a subordination is established among them, that greatly resembles the early state of every nation in Europe under the feudal system, which secured liberty in the most licentious excess to a few, and entailed the most abject slavery upon the rest. Their orders are, Earee rahie, which answers to king; Earee, baron; Manahouni, vassal; and Toutou, villain. The Earee rahie, of which there are two in this island, one being the sovereign of each
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A781.03    Beagle Library:     Hawkesworth, John. 1773. An account of the voyages undertaken for making discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere, performed by Commodore Byron, Captain Wallis, Captain Carteret, and Captain Cook in the Dolphin, the Swallow and the Endeavour drawn from the journals which were kept by the several commanders and from the papers of Joseph Banks. 3 vols. London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell. Volume 3.   Text
processions, or deposited in the earth to rot. Another numerous class among the inhabitants of this country is the slaves; for by slaves the Dutch, Portuguese, and Indians, however different in their rank or situation, are constantly attended: they are purchased from Sumatra, Malacca, and almost all the eastern islands. The natives of Java, very few of whom, as I have before observed, live in the neighbourhood of Batavia, have an exemption from slavery under the sanction of very severe penal laws
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A772    Beagle Library:     Falkner, Thomas. 1774. A description of Patagonia, and the adjoining parts of South America. Hereford: C.Pugh.   Text
motives than the well-being of the people. The Othman Family Compact has long rendered the Crimea and the Crim Tartary dependant on the Turkish Emperor; but yet it may happen that the Bourbon Family Compact may not be attended with the same consequences in regard to Spain, as the wealth, the situation, and other circumstances, of the Spanish and Tartar nations, are very different. The Spaniards have already resisted against one badge of slavery, the wearing the French dress; and there are many events
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A772    Beagle Library:     Falkner, Thomas. 1774. A description of Patagonia, and the adjoining parts of South America. Hereford: C.Pugh.   Text
captives, whom I rescued from slavery among the Indians (one of them had been seven years in that country) all this part consists of vales enclosed within low ridges of mountains, watered with springs and small brooks, which are swallowed up in little lakes, or watering places, that in summer dry up: so that many of the inhabitants, at that season, go to live on the Second Desaguadero, carrying their wives, families, and all their baggage along with them; and some go even as far as the Casuhati
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A775    Beagle Library:     Forster, Johann Reinhold. 1778. Observations made during a voyage round the world on physical geography, natural history, and ethnic philosophy. London: G. Robinson.   Text
run about at their ease the greatest part of the day; the last especially, which live entirely on what they pick up, without being regularly fed. The dog being here merely kept to be eaten, is not obliged to undergo the slavery, to which the varieties of that species are forced to submit in our polished countries; he lies at his ease all the day long, is fed at certain times, and nothing more is required 6 [page] 20
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A719.01    Beagle Library:     Thunberg, Carl Peter. 1795-6. Travels in Europe, Africa and Asia, performed between the years 1770 and 1779. London: W. Richardson and J. Egerton. Volume 1.   Text
I visited M. PINARD, the professor of botany here, and viewed his hortus siccus. The botanical garden, which is situated at the end of the town is not very large; it is divided into two parterres, and has a round mount in the middle, and an orangery, which consists of three divisions, and is not very elegant. An illicit commerce in tobacco is prohibited, under no less a penalty than that of slavery in the galleys. All the tobacco on board our ship was immediately entered and taken into custody
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A719.01    Beagle Library:     Thunberg, Carl Peter. 1795-6. Travels in Europe, Africa and Asia, performed between the years 1770 and 1779. London: W. Richardson and J. Egerton. Volume 1.   Text
that in a few years the master gets his purchase-money back again, though the slave, by such a heavy rental, cannot obtain the remission of any part of his slavery, which increases with his years, and is cemented with his blood. Tamarinds, on account of the acid they contain, were sometimes used instead of vinegar, in [page] 23
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A719.04    Beagle Library:     Thunberg, Carl Peter. 1795-6. Travels in Europe, Africa and Asia, performed between the years 1770 and 1779. London: W. Richardson and J. Egerton. Volume 4.   Text
consequence of this such a dreadful famine ensues, that, on the coast of Malabar especially, parents are forced to sell their children for slaves, for one single solitary bushel of rice, or else to give them up to slavery without any compensation, that they may not see them starved to death before their eyes. Cardamoms were brought me, which were said to be cultivated in the internal part of the Country. They were triangular oblong capsules, nearly an inch in length, and consequently quite
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A801.02    Beagle Library:     La Pérouse, Jean François de Galaup de. 1798-9. A voyage round the world performed in the years 1785, 1786, 1787, and 1788. 2 vols., atlas. London: T. Johnson. Volume 2.   Text
acknowledge their sovereignty; they are there on the contrary always at war. These pretended Moors, of whom I have already spoken, who infest their coasts, who make so many descents, and who carry away into slavery the Indians of both sexes, subject to the Spaniards, are the inhabitants of Minoanao, Panay, and Mindoro, which acknowledge no other authority than that of their particular princes, as improperly named sultans, as the people are Moors; they are in fact Malays, and embraced mahometanism
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A801.02    Beagle Library:     La Pérouse, Jean François de Galaup de. 1798-9. A voyage round the world performed in the years 1785, 1786, 1787, and 1788. 2 vols., atlas. London: T. Johnson. Volume 2.   Text
from all communication with strangers, and who detain in slavery those who have the misfortune to be shipwrecked on these coasts. Some of the Dutchmen of the ship Sparrow-hawk, after a captivity of eighteen years there, during which they received many bastinadoes, found means to take away a bark, and to cross to Japan, from which they arrived at Batavia, and afterwards at Amsterdam. This history, the narrative of which is now before [page] 35
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A831.01    Beagle Library:     Turnbull, John. 1805. A voyage round the world in the years 1800, 1801, 1802, 1803, and 1804, in which the author visited the principal islands in the Pacific Ocean, and the English settlements of Port Jackson and Norfolk Island. 3 vols. London: Richard Phillips. Volume 1.   Text
tage to the government arising from this scantiness of food amongst the natives, the convicts have thus no temptation to desertion. Some of them have had the folly to try the experiment, but becoming sensible of their error by its fatal effects, have almost immediately returned, and surrendered themselves to their former slavery. If through terror of the punishment of their desertion some few have delayed to return, they have invariably either perished with hunger, or been murdered by the
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
. Therefore all edicts whatsoever which permitted Indian slavery in any way, or under any plea, were abrogated now, and all the Indians in Para and Maranham were pronounced to be free, and exempt from any other temporal subjection except that of the laws, to which all subjects of the King of Portugal were amenable. The children of Negresses in slavery were excepted from this emancipation till further instructions, .. a clause which indicates that Carvalho contemp VOL. III. 3 U [page] 51
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAP. XXX. raising produce for the family and performing the necessary domestic work, slavery would have appeared in its least odious form; it would in reality have been only vassalage, and with this advantage over the vassalage of feudal Europe, that the condition of those who were brought to this state was materially improved by the change. Such an improvement the Court of Spain hoped to effect by the Repartimientos and Encomiendas; and upon this ground it is that slavery is still defended
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAP. XXVII. 1655. who had procured them would lose their labour, and there would be a mutiny among the people. One of the Friars helped him in this precious reasoning by saying, that the Indians lost nothing by becoming slaves, and that slavery was a practice which originated in compassion, .. as if, says Vieyra, it were the same thing to commute death for servitude as to deprive a free man of his liberty. Vidal and the Ouvidor voted with Vieyra; and as a mode of accommodating the different
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
their estates. None of their slaves were ever sold, .. from a feeling too noble in its nature and origin, and too beneficial in its effects, to be called pride, though pride was mingled with it. In a state of slavery, it is a blessing thus to be attached to the soil. The slaves in these circumstances had all the comforts which they required in such a climate: their huts were neat; they had their gardens, in which they cultivated bananas and tobacco; and they reared pigs and poultry. Those who were
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
earth: .. and this whimsical opinion has the comfortable effect of making them fancy themselves privileged persons both in this world and in the next. Koster on Slavery. Pamphleteer. Vol. 8. 324. Do. Travels. 439. Thus upon the great family estates slavery has something of the feudal character; upon the conventual, much of the patriarchal one. Among the small proprietors, who are mostly people of colour, it is alleviated, as it is among the Orientals and among savages, by the parity of condition
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
CHAP. XLIV. Difficulty of escaping from slavery. Koster's Travels. 440. 399. It is not easy for a Negro to escape from slavery in these Captaincies, where there are no wild Indians who can receive and shelter him. An African is known every where by his shibboleth, and is certainly secured, unless he can give a satisfactory account of himself. Creoles and Mulattoes have a better chance, because they may have been born free; and men of this description, when they obtain their freedom, generally
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAPTER XXIX. Affairs of Maranham. The Jesuits deprived of their temporal authority, and the Friars admitted to a share of the Aldeas. Report of Mines upon the River Tocantins: the expedition in search of them frustrated by the death of the Paulista Pascoel Paez. Conspiracy against the Governor Pedro Cesar. D. Gregorio dos Anjos first Bihsop of Maranham. The Jesuits restored to their full power, and Slavery once more abolished. Monopoly established. Insurrection of Manoel Beckman, and second
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
their duty. They perseveringly represented to the Court, that the only remedy for the evils of the State was the total abolition of Indian slavery: .. because of the tyranny of the Portugueze, the Indians, they said, were emigrating in great numbers into the Spanish territories; they were also emigrating toward the possessions of the French; but if slavery were abolished all these tribes would remain within the Portugueze limits, and become the children of the King, .. the term by which the
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A854.01    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 1.   Text
CHAP. XIII. 1602. Rel. Ann. 114. expected to make these poor savages cultivate their estates, .. went out to them, and made a long harangue to persuade them to remain; but they, who had the fear of slavery before their eyes, replied, they came there upon condition of returning as soon as the war was ended. The man who had conceived so unjust an intention, was not likely to be dissuaded from it by any remonstrance against its injustice; he could not cajole the savages and he determined
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAP. XXVI. 1652. office into which he had with such scandalous injustice intruded him. Shortly afterwards, in consequence of the frequent disputes respecting the succession and appointments, the King separated the Governments of Maranham and Para, erecting each into a distinct Captaincy. Laws respecting the slavery of the Indians. Mar. 20. 1570. Figueireds. Synopsis Chronologica. t. 2. p. 152. Aug. 22. 1587. Syn. Chron. t. 2. p. 238. Nov. 11. 1595. Syn. Chron. t. 2. p. 271. June 5. 1605. July
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAP. XXIX. 1680. Restrictions concerning trade. Mar. 31. Feb. 17, 1673. Slavery again abolished. April 1. Regulation concerning the Aldeas. April 10 April 30. degraded members of Orders which had long been the disgrace of the Romish Church, and the pest of Catholic Christendom. These things the Bishop represented to the Court, and the Governor seconded his representations, although he by his careless or criminal disregard of the existing laws, must in no slight degree have contributed to the
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
comfort and well being of the new settlers, a large proportion was always swept away in the first few months. .. What then must the mortality have been when the transition was to a state of compulsory labour, under merciless task-masters! .. and no task-masters were ever more merciless than the Portugueze of the seventeenth century, not even their rivals the Dutch. Their horror of slavery. The horror of such a slavery was well understood by the unhappy natives. [Even the cord Indians preferred
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAP. XXX. pose of making him a slave; and that when they are unsuccessful, death or slavery is what they themselves expect. But among them the yoke is easy; the slave in reality is adopted into the family of his owner, and the difference between them, among the Brazilian tribes, was merely in name. And if it were fitting that a civilized and a Christian people should follow the customs of savages, whom it was their interest and their duty to influence by good example, .. and if the argument
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
Paraiba 766 City of Paraiba 767 Captaincy General of Pernambuco 768 Recife ib. Olinda 771 Iguarass 772 Goiana ib. The Lagoas ib. Inhabitants of the interior 773 Trade of the interior 775 Itinerant Priests 776 Improvement of manners 777 Valentoens, a base kind of knight-errantry ib. Great families in Pernambuco 779 Condition of the slaves upon the great estates 780 Slaves upon the conventual estates ib. Slaves of the small proprietors 782 Usual state of the slaves Mitigations of slavery in
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
CHAP. XLIV. Koster on Slavery. 323. Usual state of the slaves. Koster on Slavery. 312 313. Do. 329. Do. Travels. 428. 403. Do. 431. Oliveira Mendes. Mem. Economicas. t. 4. p. 36. heart, to provide any comforts for themselves. The usual routine is, that the slaves begin work at six o'clock, and continue till half past five, or six, with intervals of half an hour for breakfast, and two hours at noon. Sometimes, there is home work for an hour or two after the field labour; and in crop time, which
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
CHAP. XLIV. seems to be partly habit, partly disease, .. but a disease for which coercion is the cure. Ill-used, or indignant slaves, sometimes put an end to their sufferings in a more summary way. This is frequent among the Gabam Negroes, a tall, handsome race, accused of cannibalism in their own country, and of all Africans the most untractable. Whole lots of them, when purchased together, have destroyed themselves, or pined to death. Koster's Travels. 420 421. Mitigations of slavery in
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
CHAP. XLIV. Frequent emancipations. Koster's Travels. 407 408. Koster on Slavery. 326 329. as domestic servants. Many are emancipated at the death of their owners; and rich proprietors generally set some at liberty during their life time. The woman who shall have reared ten children, is declared free, by a law more benignant in appearance than in reality, because its benefits can but possibly extend to very few; and it becomes a cruel aggravation of the keenest of all griefs, when the parent
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