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A762    Beagle Library:     Dampier, William. 1697. A new voyage round the world. London: James Knapton.   Text
Indians that are free; and at these publick Meetings, when they are in the greatest of their jollity, their Mirth seems to be rather forced than real. Their Songs are very melancholy and doleful; so is their Musick: but whether it be natural to the Indians to be thus melancholy, or the effect of their Slavery, I am not certain: But I have always been prone to believe, that they are then only condoling their Misfortunes, the loss of their Country and Liberties: which altho' these that are now living
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A777    Beagle Library:     Frézier, Amédée François. 1717. A voyage to the South-Sea and along the coasts of Chili and Peru in the years 1712, 1713, and 1714. London: Jonah Bowyer.   Text
in Justinian's Institutes, when the Father is a Servant in Commendam; because the latter being permitted, the Advantage is to accrue to him preferable to the other. The Mixture of Spanish Blood makes those free whom the Father will own; and entitles the Mestices, that is, the Sons of a Spaniard and an Indian Woman, to wear Linnen. To know the Original of this sort of Slavery, we must look back to the Conquest of Peru. The private Persons who are the first Authors, ought, by their Contract With
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A753    Book:     Byron, John. 1768. The narrative of the Honourable John Byron (Commodore in a late expedition around the world) containing an account of the great distresses suffered by himself and his companions on the coast of Patagonia, from the year 1740, till their arrival in England, 1746. London: S.Baker and G. Leigh, and T. Davies.   Text
slavery, by mere dint of hard usage and punishments, that it appears to me the most absurd thing in the world, that the Spaniards should rely upon these people for assistance upon any emergency. We embarked in the evening, and it was night before we got to the place where we were to be delivered up to the Spanish guard. We were met by three or four officers, and a number of soldiers, all with their spados drawn, who surrounded us as if they had the most formidable enemy to take charge of
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A745    Beagle Library:     Bougainville, Louis Antoine de. 1772. A voyage round the world performed by order of His Most Christian Majesty in the years 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769. Translated by John Reinhold Forster. London: J. Nourse and T. Davies.   Text
tyranny and oppression, we cannot let these sentiments pass unnoticed. It would have appeared to us impossible, that such an idea as this could enter into any man's head who is in his right senses: he wrote down this strange assertion, either being carried away by the itch to say something extraordinary and paradoxical, or in order to make slavery more tolerable to his fellow Frenchmen Slavery endeavours to extirpate and to smother all sentiments of honour, which only can operate in the breast of a
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A745    Beagle Library:     Bougainville, Louis Antoine de. 1772. A voyage round the world performed by order of His Most Christian Majesty in the years 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769. Translated by John Reinhold Forster. London: J. Nourse and T. Davies.   Text
general slavery, and the police which they observe here with regard to the natives, is the same in all their other factories. If one chief forms a plot, another discovers it, and immediately informs the Dutch of it. These moors are, upon the whole, ugly, lazy, and not at all warlike. They are greatly afraid of the Papous, or inhabitants of Papua; who come sometimes in numbers of two or three hundred to burn their habitations, and to carry off all they can, and especially slaves. The remembrance of
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A745    Beagle Library:     Bougainville, Louis Antoine de. 1772. A voyage round the world performed by order of His Most Christian Majesty in the years 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769. Translated by John Reinhold Forster. London: J. Nourse and T. Davies.   Text
three or four guns at her, which she did not attend to. She certainly took us for a Dutch ship, and was afraid of slavery. Almost all the people of this coast are pirates, and the Dutch make slaves of them whenever they take any. Being obliged to abandon the pursuit of this boat, I ordered the Etoile's canoe to sound a-head of us. [page] 40
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A745    Beagle Library:     Bougainville, Louis Antoine de. 1772. A voyage round the world performed by order of His Most Christian Majesty in the years 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769. Translated by John Reinhold Forster. London: J. Nourse and T. Davies.   Text
murder, or carry them into slavery. This evil cannot be remedied: for, how is it possible to conquer a nomadic nation, in an immense uncultivated country, where it would be difficult even to find them: besides, these Indians are brave and inured to hardships; and those times exist no longer, when one Spaniard could put a thousand Indians to flight. Race of robbers, settled on the north side of the river. A set of robbers united into a body, a few years ago, on the north side of the river, and
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A745    Beagle Library:     Bougainville, Louis Antoine de. 1772. A voyage round the world performed by order of His Most Christian Majesty in the years 1766, 1767, 1768, and 1769. Translated by John Reinhold Forster. London: J. Nourse and T. Davies.   Text
as an interpreter. The governor appeared in a balcony; he told them, that they were welcome; that they should go to rest themselves, and that he would send them notice of the day which he should fix in order to let them know the king's intentions. He added, in general, that he was come to release them from slavery, and put them in possession of their property, which they had not hitherto enjoyed. They answered by a general cry, lifting up their right hands to heaven, and wishing all prosperity
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A781.02    Beagle Library:     Hawkesworth, John. 1773. An account of the voyages undertaken for making discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere, performed by Commodore Byron, Captain Wallis, Captain Carteret, and Captain Cook in the Dolphin, the Swallow and the Endeavour drawn from the journals which were kept by the several commanders and from the papers of Joseph Banks. 3 vols. London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell. Volume 2.   Text
utterly unknown, live under a regular form of government; yet a subordination is established among them, that greatly resembles the early state of every nation in Europe under the feudal system, which secured liberty in the most licentious excess to a few, and entailed the most abject slavery upon the rest. Their orders are, Earee rahie, which answers to king; Earee, baron; Manahouni, vassal; and Toutou, villain. The Earee rahie, of which there are two in this island, one being the sovereign of each
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A781.03    Beagle Library:     Hawkesworth, John. 1773. An account of the voyages undertaken for making discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere, performed by Commodore Byron, Captain Wallis, Captain Carteret, and Captain Cook in the Dolphin, the Swallow and the Endeavour drawn from the journals which were kept by the several commanders and from the papers of Joseph Banks. 3 vols. London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell. Volume 3.   Text
processions, or deposited in the earth to rot. Another numerous class among the inhabitants of this country is the slaves; for by slaves the Dutch, Portuguese, and Indians, however different in their rank or situation, are constantly attended: they are purchased from Sumatra, Malacca, and almost all the eastern islands. The natives of Java, very few of whom, as I have before observed, live in the neighbourhood of Batavia, have an exemption from slavery under the sanction of very severe penal laws
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A772    Beagle Library:     Falkner, Thomas. 1774. A description of Patagonia, and the adjoining parts of South America. Hereford: C.Pugh.   Text
motives than the well-being of the people. The Othman Family Compact has long rendered the Crimea and the Crim Tartary dependant on the Turkish Emperor; but yet it may happen that the Bourbon Family Compact may not be attended with the same consequences in regard to Spain, as the wealth, the situation, and other circumstances, of the Spanish and Tartar nations, are very different. The Spaniards have already resisted against one badge of slavery, the wearing the French dress; and there are many events
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A772    Beagle Library:     Falkner, Thomas. 1774. A description of Patagonia, and the adjoining parts of South America. Hereford: C.Pugh.   Text
captives, whom I rescued from slavery among the Indians (one of them had been seven years in that country) all this part consists of vales enclosed within low ridges of mountains, watered with springs and small brooks, which are swallowed up in little lakes, or watering places, that in summer dry up: so that many of the inhabitants, at that season, go to live on the Second Desaguadero, carrying their wives, families, and all their baggage along with them; and some go even as far as the Casuhati
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A775    Beagle Library:     Forster, Johann Reinhold. 1778. Observations made during a voyage round the world on physical geography, natural history, and ethnic philosophy. London: G. Robinson.   Text
run about at their ease the greatest part of the day; the last especially, which live entirely on what they pick up, without being regularly fed. The dog being here merely kept to be eaten, is not obliged to undergo the slavery, to which the varieties of that species are forced to submit in our polished countries; he lies at his ease all the day long, is fed at certain times, and nothing more is required 6 [page] 20
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A897.1    Beagle Library:     Pennant, Thomas. 1793. History of quadrupeds. 3rd ed. 2 vols. London: B. & J. White. Volume 1.   Text
horns aretwenty-two inches long; the space between tip and tip near eleven; the girth near the base the same. This poor animal had the ill fortune to fall, in our land of freedom, into heavy slavery, and hard usage, in the latter part of his life, which Uinted its growth, and prevented the luxuriancy of its horns; which ought, at its age, to have had the volutes of a largehorned ram, to have been fifteen inches round at the base, and to have resembled those of the painting by Oudry. The colors
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A719.01    Beagle Library:     Thunberg, Carl Peter. 1795-6. Travels in Europe, Africa and Asia, performed between the years 1770 and 1779. 4 vols. London: W. Richardson and J. Egerton. Volume 1.   Text
I visited M. PINARD, the professor of botany here, and viewed his hortus siccus. The botanical garden, which is situated at the end of the town is not very large; it is divided into two parterres, and has a round mount in the middle, and an orangery, which consists of three divisions, and is not very elegant. An illicit commerce in tobacco is prohibited, under no less a penalty than that of slavery in the galleys. All the tobacco on board our ship was immediately entered and taken into custody
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A719.01    Beagle Library:     Thunberg, Carl Peter. 1795-6. Travels in Europe, Africa and Asia, performed between the years 1770 and 1779. 4 vols. London: W. Richardson and J. Egerton. Volume 1.   Text
that in a few years the master gets his purchase-money back again, though the slave, by such a heavy rental, cannot obtain the remission of any part of his slavery, which increases with his years, and is cemented with his blood. Tamarinds, on account of the acid they contain, were sometimes used instead of vinegar, in [page] 23
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A719.04    Beagle Library:     Thunberg, Carl Peter. 1795-6. Travels in Europe, Africa and Asia, performed between the years 1770 and 1779. 4 vols. London: W. Richardson and J. Egerton. Volume 4.   Text
consequence of this such a dreadful famine ensues, that, on the coast of Malabar especially, parents are forced to sell their children for slaves, for one single solitary bushel of rice, or else to give them up to slavery without any compensation, that they may not see them starved to death before their eyes. Cardamoms were brought me, which were said to be cultivated in the internal part of the Country. They were triangular oblong capsules, nearly an inch in length, and consequently quite
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A801.02    Beagle Library:     La Pérouse, Jean François de Galaup de. 1798-9. A voyage round the world performed in the years 1785, 1786, 1787, and 1788. 3 vols., atlas. London: T. Johnson. Volume 2.   Text
acknowledge their sovereignty; they are there on the contrary always at war. These pretended Moors, of whom I have already spoken, who infest their coasts, who make so many descents, and who carry away into slavery the Indians of both sexes, subject to the Spaniards, are the inhabitants of Minoanao, Panay, and Mindoro, which acknowledge no other authority than that of their particular princes, as improperly named sultans, as the people are Moors; they are in fact Malays, and embraced mahometanism
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A801.02    Beagle Library:     La Pérouse, Jean François de Galaup de. 1798-9. A voyage round the world performed in the years 1785, 1786, 1787, and 1788. 3 vols., atlas. London: T. Johnson. Volume 2.   Text
from all communication with strangers, and who detain in slavery those who have the misfortune to be shipwrecked on these coasts. Some of the Dutchmen of the ship Sparrow-hawk, after a captivity of eighteen years there, during which they received many bastinadoes, found means to take away a bark, and to cross to Japan, from which they arrived at Batavia, and afterwards at Amsterdam. This history, the narrative of which is now before [page] 35
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A925.4    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 4 (1816)   Text
enabled the insurgents for many years to keep all the Spanish settlements in the Island in continual alarm, and to maintain their own independence. During this time, the question of the propriety of keeping the Islanders in slavery, underwent grave examinations. It is related that the experiment was tried, of allowing a number of the natives to build themselves two villages, to live in them according to their own customs and liking; and that the result was, they were found to be so improvident
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A925.2    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 2 (1806)   Text
hair. They all had beards. In their wars they made use of bows and arrows: they were good navigators, and had large sailing canoes, in which they made voyages to other lands. Torres relates that slavery was practised among them; and an instance of this came within the knowledge of the Spaniards, which will be noticed. The Island appeared well stocked with vegetable productions of the kinds already mentioned. The natives had hogs and fowls, and the sea supplied them with fish in plenty. In
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A925.3    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 3 (1813)   Text
them, from which they had been driven by persecution and oppression; there to cultivate the soil for their oppressors, to crouch to them; in short, they were most basely carried into abject slavery: and all this was perpetrated under the unrighteous assumption, that it advanced the cause of Religion. This victory,' says Gobien, 'established peace. The inhabitants of the Isles of Gani (for so the Isles farther North are called) did not wait for troops. They submitted to the Spaniards, and were
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A925.4    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 4 (1816)   Text
CHAP. 2. 1503. African Slaves carried to the West Indies. again doomed to slavery, they sunk so rapidly, that it suggested to the murderous proprietors of the mines the having recourse to Africa for slaves. Ovando, after small experience of this practice, endeavoured to oppose it as dangerous, the Africans frequently escaping from their masters, and finding concealment among the natives, in whom they excited some spirit of resistance. The ill use made by the Grand Commander of the powers with
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A925.4    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 4 (1816)   Text
the greater or less interest there may be in observing it. But if there had been no engagement, the length and steadiness of their attachment to Great Britain would have entitled them to her protection, and the nature of the case rendered the obligation sacred; for be it repeated, that experience had shewn the delivering them up to the dominion of the Spaniards, was delivering them to certain slavery and death. These considerations possibly might not occur, for there seems to have been a want
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A925.2    Beagle Library:     Burney, James. 1803-17. Chronological history of the voyages and discoveries in the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. 5 vols. London: printed by Luke Hansard, near Lincoln's-Inn Fields, and sold by G. and W. Nicol, bookseller to His Majesty, Pall-Mall, G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, J. Robson, New Bond-Street, T. Payne, Mew's-Gate, and Cadell and Davies, in the Strand. Volume 2 (1806)   Text
small, all peopled, naming them by their names, and telling us that they were at war with many of them. They also gave us intelligence of the Island Santa Cruz and of what had happened when the Adelantado was there. The people of this Island are of ordinary stature: they have amongst them people white and red, some in colour like those of the Indies, others woolly headed blacks, and mulattoes. Slavery is in use amongst them. Their food is yams, fish, cocoanuts, and they have hogs and fowls. This
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A831.01    Beagle Library:     Turnbull, John. 1805. A voyage round the world in the years 1800, 1801, 1802, 1803, and 1804, in which the author visited the principal islands in the Pacific Ocean, and the English settlements of Port Jackson and Norfolk Island. 3 vols. London: Richard Phillips. Volume 1.   Text
tage to the government arising from this scantiness of food amongst the natives, the convicts have thus no temptation to desertion. Some of them have had the folly to try the experiment, but becoming sensible of their error by its fatal effects, have almost immediately returned, and surrendered themselves to their former slavery. If through terror of the punishment of their desertion some few have delayed to return, they have invariably either perished with hunger, or been murdered by the
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
. Therefore all edicts whatsoever which permitted Indian slavery in any way, or under any plea, were abrogated now, and all the Indians in Para and Maranham were pronounced to be free, and exempt from any other temporal subjection except that of the laws, to which all subjects of the King of Portugal were amenable. The children of Negresses in slavery were excepted from this emancipation till further instructions, .. a clause which indicates that Carvalho contemp VOL. III. 3 U [page] 51
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAP. XXX. raising produce for the family and performing the necessary domestic work, slavery would have appeared in its least odious form; it would in reality have been only vassalage, and with this advantage over the vassalage of feudal Europe, that the condition of those who were brought to this state was materially improved by the change. Such an improvement the Court of Spain hoped to effect by the Repartimientos and Encomiendas; and upon this ground it is that slavery is still defended
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAP. XXVII. 1655. who had procured them would lose their labour, and there would be a mutiny among the people. One of the Friars helped him in this precious reasoning by saying, that the Indians lost nothing by becoming slaves, and that slavery was a practice which originated in compassion, .. as if, says Vieyra, it were the same thing to commute death for servitude as to deprive a free man of his liberty. Vidal and the Ouvidor voted with Vieyra; and as a mode of accommodating the different
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
their estates. None of their slaves were ever sold, .. from a feeling too noble in its nature and origin, and too beneficial in its effects, to be called pride, though pride was mingled with it. In a state of slavery, it is a blessing thus to be attached to the soil. The slaves in these circumstances had all the comforts which they required in such a climate: their huts were neat; they had their gardens, in which they cultivated bananas and tobacco; and they reared pigs and poultry. Those who were
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
earth: .. and this whimsical opinion has the comfortable effect of making them fancy themselves privileged persons both in this world and in the next. Koster on Slavery. Pamphleteer. Vol. 8. 324. Do. Travels. 439. Thus upon the great family estates slavery has something of the feudal character; upon the conventual, much of the patriarchal one. Among the small proprietors, who are mostly people of colour, it is alleviated, as it is among the Orientals and among savages, by the parity of condition
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
CHAP. XLIV. Difficulty of escaping from slavery. Koster's Travels. 440. 399. It is not easy for a Negro to escape from slavery in these Captaincies, where there are no wild Indians who can receive and shelter him. An African is known every where by his shibboleth, and is certainly secured, unless he can give a satisfactory account of himself. Creoles and Mulattoes have a better chance, because they may have been born free; and men of this description, when they obtain their freedom, generally
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAPTER XXIX. Affairs of Maranham. The Jesuits deprived of their temporal authority, and the Friars admitted to a share of the Aldeas. Report of Mines upon the River Tocantins: the expedition in search of them frustrated by the death of the Paulista Pascoel Paez. Conspiracy against the Governor Pedro Cesar. D. Gregorio dos Anjos first Bihsop of Maranham. The Jesuits restored to their full power, and Slavery once more abolished. Monopoly established. Insurrection of Manoel Beckman, and second
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
their duty. They perseveringly represented to the Court, that the only remedy for the evils of the State was the total abolition of Indian slavery: .. because of the tyranny of the Portugueze, the Indians, they said, were emigrating in great numbers into the Spanish territories; they were also emigrating toward the possessions of the French; but if slavery were abolished all these tribes would remain within the Portugueze limits, and become the children of the King, .. the term by which the
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A854.01    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 1.   Text
CHAP. XIII. 1602. Rel. Ann. 114. expected to make these poor savages cultivate their estates, .. went out to them, and made a long harangue to persuade them to remain; but they, who had the fear of slavery before their eyes, replied, they came there upon condition of returning as soon as the war was ended. The man who had conceived so unjust an intention, was not likely to be dissuaded from it by any remonstrance against its injustice; he could not cajole the savages and he determined
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAP. XXVI. 1652. office into which he had with such scandalous injustice intruded him. Shortly afterwards, in consequence of the frequent disputes respecting the succession and appointments, the King separated the Governments of Maranham and Para, erecting each into a distinct Captaincy. Laws respecting the slavery of the Indians. Mar. 20. 1570. Figueireds. Synopsis Chronologica. t. 2. p. 152. Aug. 22. 1587. Syn. Chron. t. 2. p. 238. Nov. 11. 1595. Syn. Chron. t. 2. p. 271. June 5. 1605. July
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAP. XXIX. 1680. Restrictions concerning trade. Mar. 31. Feb. 17, 1673. Slavery again abolished. April 1. Regulation concerning the Aldeas. April 10 April 30. degraded members of Orders which had long been the disgrace of the Romish Church, and the pest of Catholic Christendom. These things the Bishop represented to the Court, and the Governor seconded his representations, although he by his careless or criminal disregard of the existing laws, must in no slight degree have contributed to the
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
comfort and well being of the new settlers, a large proportion was always swept away in the first few months. .. What then must the mortality have been when the transition was to a state of compulsory labour, under merciless task-masters! .. and no task-masters were ever more merciless than the Portugueze of the seventeenth century, not even their rivals the Dutch. Their horror of slavery. The horror of such a slavery was well understood by the unhappy natives. [Even the cord Indians preferred
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAP. XXX. pose of making him a slave; and that when they are unsuccessful, death or slavery is what they themselves expect. But among them the yoke is easy; the slave in reality is adopted into the family of his owner, and the difference between them, among the Brazilian tribes, was merely in name. And if it were fitting that a civilized and a Christian people should follow the customs of savages, whom it was their interest and their duty to influence by good example, .. and if the argument
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
Paraiba 766 City of Paraiba 767 Captaincy General of Pernambuco 768 Recife ib. Olinda 771 Iguarass 772 Goiana ib. The Lagoas ib. Inhabitants of the interior 773 Trade of the interior 775 Itinerant Priests 776 Improvement of manners 777 Valentoens, a base kind of knight-errantry ib. Great families in Pernambuco 779 Condition of the slaves upon the great estates 780 Slaves upon the conventual estates ib. Slaves of the small proprietors 782 Usual state of the slaves Mitigations of slavery in
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
CHAP. XLIV. Koster on Slavery. 323. Usual state of the slaves. Koster on Slavery. 312 313. Do. 329. Do. Travels. 428. 403. Do. 431. Oliveira Mendes. Mem. Economicas. t. 4. p. 36. heart, to provide any comforts for themselves. The usual routine is, that the slaves begin work at six o'clock, and continue till half past five, or six, with intervals of half an hour for breakfast, and two hours at noon. Sometimes, there is home work for an hour or two after the field labour; and in crop time, which
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
CHAP. XLIV. seems to be partly habit, partly disease, .. but a disease for which coercion is the cure. Ill-used, or indignant slaves, sometimes put an end to their sufferings in a more summary way. This is frequent among the Gabam Negroes, a tall, handsome race, accused of cannibalism in their own country, and of all Africans the most untractable. Whole lots of them, when purchased together, have destroyed themselves, or pined to death. Koster's Travels. 420 421. Mitigations of slavery in
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
CHAP. XLIV. Frequent emancipations. Koster's Travels. 407 408. Koster on Slavery. 326 329. as domestic servants. Many are emancipated at the death of their owners; and rich proprietors generally set some at liberty during their life time. The woman who shall have reared ten children, is declared free, by a law more benignant in appearance than in reality, because its benefits can but possibly extend to very few; and it becomes a cruel aggravation of the keenest of all griefs, when the parent
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
CHAP. XLIV. Vieira da Silva. 18. 21. Slaves. Do. 20. 23. Patriota. 3. 6. 53. Cook's First Voyage. ch. 2. Cazal. 1. 60. was frequently tainted before it was consumed; and the cattle, which were to serve for the whole week's consumption, were driven at once into the pens, and there, after a long journey in that burning climate, the poor creatures were suffered to remain, each till its time of butchery; many, therefore, for many days without food, and without water, .. so inhuman is man! Slavery
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAPTER XXVI. State of Maranham. Laws respecting Indian slavery: the law for the abolition resisted at St. Luiz and Belem. History of F. Antonio Vieyra. He goes to Maranham as Superior of the Mission, and in consequence of a sermon prevails upon the inhabitants to submit to an arrangement. The Governor defeats all his purposes, in violation of the King's orders. He sails for Lisbon; and transacts the business at Court in person. Vidal is appointed Governor of Maranham and Para, and Vieyra
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAPTER XXVII. Proceedings respecting Slavery in Para and Maranham. Plans of Vieyra. Ineffectual search for mines. Successful missions on the side of Seara, and in the Ilha dos Joanes. Insurrection against the Jesuits, their expulsion, and restoration. CHAP. XXVII. 1655. Vidal takes possession of the Government. Vidal had arrived in Maranham a few days before Vieyra, and had probably expressed his opinion of him, for the Chamber waited upon the Jesuit in a body to congratulate him upon his
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
CHAPTER XXX. View of the progress of Brazil during the seventeenth century. Maranham and Para: state of the revenues and establishment. Produce. Expeditions into the interior. Slavery. Seara. Rio Grande. Pernambuco. Transitory effects of the Dutch conquest. Bahia. Rio de Janeiro. S. Paulo. State of manners. Artifices of the Clergy. Audacious fables of the Jesuits. Life of F. Joam d'Almeida. CHAP. XXX. 1685. Seventy years had now elapsed since the Portugueze established themselves in Maranham
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
Captaincy of; iii. 803; interior still possessed by savages, 804; town of Ilheos, 805. Imbuzeiro, a remarkable tree in Brazil, iii. 757. Immensa Pastorum, bull, published, iii. 511. Indians, their custom of flattening their heads, i. 657; laws respecting the slavery of, ii. 453; examination of the captives at Belem, 502; villainy of the Captains and Judges, 503; new edicts respecting, 591; suspended by Sequeira, 592; slavery of, again abolished in Brazil, 603; mortality among, 638; their horror of
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A854.03    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 3.   Text
Jesuits among the Chiquitos, iii. 168. Slavery, of the Indians, laws respecting, ii. 453; the people of Maranham consent to an arrangement respecting slaves, 482; slavery reestablished in Maranham, 590; a kidnapping party cut off by the natives, 591; fallacious defence of, 644; law for the abolishment of, iii. 513. Slaves, denominated Pessas in Brazil, ii. 702; state of slaves on the estates of the great families in Pernambuco, iii. 780; on the conventual estates, ib.; slaves of the small
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A854.02    Beagle Library:     Southey, Robert. 1810-19. History of Brazil. 3 vols. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme. Volume 2.   Text
the Taramambases 601 The Jesuits restored to all their former power 602 Restriction concerning trade 603 Slavery again abolished ib. Regulations concerning the Aldeas ib. Francisco de Sa, Governor 604 Establishment of an Exclusive Company ib. Discontents at Maranham 605 Indecision of the Capitam Mor and the Governor 606 Conspiracy formed by Beckman ib. Midnight assemblage of the people 608 Insurrection 609 Imprisonment of the Capitam Mor ib. Proceedings of the victorious party ib. The insurgents
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