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A922    Beagle Library:     Somerville, Mary. 1834. On the connexion of the physical sciences. London: John Murray.   Text
. Young's shows that there are exceptions. When a tuning-fork vibrates, its two branches alternately recede from and approach one another; each communicates its vibrations to the air, and a musical note is the consequence. If the fork be held upright, about a foot from the ear, and turned round its axis while vibrating, at every [page] 15
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A922    Beagle Library:     Somerville, Mary. 1834. On the connexion of the physical sciences. London: John Murray.   Text
, capable of following its undulations, either by vibrating entire, or by separating themselves into their harmonic divisions. When a tuning-fork receives a blow, and is made to rest upon a pianoforte, during its vibration every string which, either by its natural length, or by its spontaneous subdivisions, is capable of executing corresponding vibrations, responds in a sympathetic note. Some one or other of the notes of an organ are generally in unison with one of the panes, or with the whole sash
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F944    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1874. The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex. London: John Murray. 2d edition; tenth thousand.   Text   Image   PDF
males of an Eristalis courting a female; they hovered above her, and flew from side to side, making a high humming noise at the same time. Gnats and mosquitoes (Culicid ) also seem to attract each other by humming; and Prof. Mayer has recently ascertained that the hairs on the antenn of the male vibrate in unison with the notes of a tuning-fork, within the range of the sounds emitted by the female. The longer hairs vibrate sympathetically with the graver notes, and the shorter hairs with the higher
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F1416    Book contribution:     [Extracts from Darwin's notes throughout.] 1882. In Romanes, G. J., Animal intelligence. London: Kegan Paul Trench & Co.   Text   Image   PDF
back without doing considerable damage to the web, generally gumming together the sticky parallel threads in groups of three and four. By means of a tuning-fork a spider may be made to eat what it would otherwise avoid. I took a fly that had been drowned in paraffin and put it into a spider's web, and then attracted the spider by touching the fly with a fork. When the spider had come to the conclusion that it was not suitable food, and was leaving it, I touched the fly again. This had the same
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F1416    Book contribution:     [Extracts from Darwin's notes throughout.] 1882. In Romanes, G. J., Animal intelligence. London: Kegan Paul Trench & Co.   Text   Image   PDF
observations on the garden spider which are I believe new, I send a short account of them, in the hope that they may be of interest to the readers of Nature. Last autumn, while watching some spiders spinning their beautiful geometrical webs, it occurred to me to try what effect a tuning-fork would have upon them. On sounding an A fork, and lightly touching with it any leaf or other support of the web, or any portion of the web itself, I found that the spider, if at the centre of the web, rapidly
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F1416    Book contribution:     [Extracts from Darwin's notes throughout.] 1882. In Romanes, G. J., Animal intelligence. London: Kegan Paul Trench & Co.   Text   Image   PDF
pelicans, 284 Bosc, on migrating fish, 248 Bower-bird, instincts of, 279-81, 325 Bowman, Parker, his cat opening swivel of window, 425 Boys, C. V., his experiments with a tuning-fork on spiders, 206, 207 Brehm, on wasps recognising persons, 188; intelligence of lapwing, 315, 316; curiosity of monkeys, 477 Broderip, on vindictiveness of elephant, 389 Brodie, Sir B., his definition of instinct, 15; on bees strengthening their combs, 185,186 Brofft, Herr L., on powers of communication in bees, 160
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F955    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1882. The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex. London: John Murray. 2d edition, fifteenth thousand.   Text   Image   PDF
males of an Eristalis courting a female; they hovered above her, and flew from side to side, making a high humming noise at the same time. Gnats and mosquitoes (Culicidæ) also seem to attract each other by humming; and Prof. Mayer has recently ascertained that the hairs on the antennæ of the male vibrate in unison with the notes of a tuning-fork, within the range of the sounds emitted by the female. The longer hairs vibrate sympathetically with the graver notes, and the shorter hairs with the higher
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A346    Periodical contribution:     Blackman, F. F. 1932. Obituary notice of Francis Darwin. (With portrait). 1848-1925. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London 110: i-xxi.   Text   Image
), he showed that the stimulating effect of starch grains on an unaccustomed side of the cell is heightened if the tissue is kept in vibration on the prong of a tuning fork so that the starch grains dance on the protoplasm surface. A later contribution (X, 1904) dealt with the exposure of roots and shoots to weak centrifugal force which had long been known to excite in the same way as gravity. He found that with a force sufficient to displace the starch grains the appropriate geotropic excitation
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