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A32    Review:     [Huxley, T. H.] 1860. Darwin on the origin of Species. Westminster Review, 17 (n.s.): 541-70.   Text   Image
rendered to science, Kepler and Newton had to come after him. What if the orbit of Darwinism should be a little too circular? What if species should offer residual phænomena, here and there, not explicable by natural selection? Twenty years hence naturalists may be in a position to say whether this is, or is not, the case; but in either event they will owe the author of The Origin of Species an immense debt of gratitude. We should leave a very wrong impression on the reader's mind if we permitted him
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A60    Review:     Parsons, Theophilus. 1860. [Review of] On the Origin of species. American Journal of Science and Arts. (Ser. 2) 30 (July): 1-13. [Silliman's Journal]   Text   Image
stands the father of the yaller dog of New England?* But this notion of man being born from an animal stands in * I allude, of course, to the January number of the Atlantic Monthly, wherein this strange animals is presented with that wonderful power of word-painting, which is a true daguerreotyping by the sunlight of genius. But I write this note rather to refer to an article in the North American Review for July, 1857, in which Dr. Holmes, before the controversy about Darwinism began, treats
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A2455    Review:     [Hardwicke, R]. 1863. [Review of Origin and T. H. Huxley's lecture ‘On our Knowledge of the Causes of the Phenomena of Organic Nature']. The origin of species. (Mr. Darwin and his commentators.) Popular Science Review, 2: 385-404.   Text   PDF
objectionable one as some one else whom he names) and his theory has pretty well dropped into oblivion, as it deserved to do. Put him on the shelf, and if persons tell you that Mr. Darwin is groping towards truth as he did, I won't instruct you what to think of their judgment, but will leave you to think what you like, and believe in Darwin. 'Darwinism, or nothing,' is my motto to-day-but, mind, I don't pledge myself to him, and should anything turn up to-morrow, that appears to serve our purpose better
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A2455    Review:     [Hardwicke, R]. 1863. [Review of Origin and T. H. Huxley's lecture ‘On our Knowledge of the Causes of the Phenomena of Organic Nature']. The origin of species. (Mr. Darwin and his commentators.) Popular Science Review, 2: 385-404.   Text   PDF
, and also of the production of a remarkable variety of sheep. These cases the author refers to spontaneous variation, but he is so wedded to his adopted theory, that they do not suggest to him anything beyond chance. They are accidental variations. This may be so, or it may not; but we will grant that it is so. Is there nothing to be learned from the first appearance of these monstrosities? If Darwinism be unable to account for these mysterious apparitions in nature, may they not serve as a clue
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A2455    Review:     [Hardwicke, R]. 1863. [Review of Origin and T. H. Huxley's lecture ‘On our Knowledge of the Causes of the Phenomena of Organic Nature']. The origin of species. (Mr. Darwin and his commentators.) Popular Science Review, 2: 385-404.   Text   PDF
plate was not stolen by a burglar, who, I believe, did effect his escape in this manner, and in justice you ought to transport the man.) But we have not the space, nor is it needful, we think, to follow the author further in his reasoning. It may have appeared very clear to the working classes, but it has not satisfied us that there is no alternative between Darwinism and nothing. Perhaps as we do not ask our readers to bring the Baconian philosophy to bear upon this inquiry, the author will
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A63    Review:     Huxley, T. H. 1864. Criticisms on "The origin of species." Natural History Review. n.s. 4: 566-580.   Text   Image
comprehend the first principles of the doctrine which he assails so rudely. His objections to details are of the old sort, so battered and hackneyed on this side of the Channel, that not even a 'Quarterly' Reviewer could be induced to pick them up for the purpose of pelting Mr. Darwin over again. We have Cuvier and the mummies; M. Roulin and the domesticated animals of America; the difficulties presented by hybridism and by Paleontology; Darwinism a rifacciamento of De Maillet and Lamarck; Darwinism
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A63    Review:     Huxley, T. H. 1864. Criticisms on "The origin of species." Natural History Review. n.s. 4: 566-580.   Text   Image
may bring into clearer light the profound opposition between the ordinary Teleological and the Darwinian conception. Cats catch mice, small birds and the like, very well. Teleology tells us that they do so because they were expressly constructed for so doing that they are perfect mousing apparatuses, so perfect and so delicately adjusted that no one of their organs could be altered, without the change involving the alteration of all the rest. Darwinism affirms, on the contrary, that there was
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A63    Review:     Huxley, T. H. 1864. Criticisms on "The origin of species." Natural History Review. n.s. 4: 566-580.   Text   Image
variations of the Feline stock, many of which died out from want of power to resist opposing influences, some, the cats, were better fitted to catch mice than others, whence they throve and persisted in proportion to the advantage over their fellows thus offered to them. Far from imagining that cats exist in order to catch mice well, Darwinism supposes that cats exist because they catch mice well mousing being not the end, but the condition, of their existence, and if the cat-type has long
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A63    Review:     Huxley, T. H. 1864. Criticisms on "The origin of species." Natural History Review. n.s. 4: 566-580.   Text   Image
by one which he terms the 'Theory of Heterogeneous Generation.' We shall proceed to consider first the destructive, and secondly, the constructive portion of the essay. We regret to find ourselves compelled to dissent very widely from many of Professor K lliker's remarks; and from none more thoroughly than from those in which he seeks to define what we may term the philosophical position of Darwinism. Darwin (says Professor K lliker) is, in the fullest sense of the word, a Teleologist, He says
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A604    Review:     Lewes, George Henry. 1868. Mr. Darwin's hypotheses. Fortnightly Review n.s. 3 (April, June); 353-73, 611-28, 4 (July), (November): 61-80, 492-509.   Text   Image
, believing in the ultimate triumph of the former, I look on the Development Hypothesis as one of the great influences which will by its acceptance, in conjunction with the spread of scientific culture, hasten that triumph, teaching us, to use Goethe's words, Wie Natur im Schaffen lebt. Und es ist das ewig Eine Das sich vielfach offenbart. But it is one thing to hold firmly to the Development Hypothesis, another thing to accept Natural Selection as the last word on that subject. Darwinism is undoubtedly
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A604    Review:     Lewes, George Henry. 1868. Mr. Darwin's hypotheses. Fortnightly Review n.s. 3 (April, June); 353-73, 611-28, 4 (July), (November): 61-80, 492-509.   Text   Image
arguments on one side than on the other; and that, in consequence of this native bias, we may generally predict what will be his views in Religion, Philosophy, and Art to a great extent even in Science. Be this as it may, there can be little doubt that the acceptance or the rejection of Darwinism has, in the vast (1) Robinet, De la Nature, Amst. 1766. (I gave an analysis of this book in Fraser's Magazine, Nov., 1857.) [page] 35
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A604    Review:     Lewes, George Henry. 1868. Mr. Darwin's hypotheses. Fortnightly Review n.s. 3 (April, June); 353-73, 611-28, 4 (July), (November): 61-80, 492-509.   Text   Image
not as a refutation of that hypothesis. Indeed, we must protest against the frequent assumption that Darwinism is disproved because it fails to account for all the phenomena: if it interprets truly some of the phenomena, it is valuable as a colligation of facts; if it interpreted all of them it would cease to be an hypothesis. Observe, moreover, that writers who are most contemptuous against this hypothesis because it fails or they think so to explain some phenomena, urge us to accept the
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A606    Review:     [Dallas, William Sweetland?]. 1868. [Review of] Variation of animals and plants under domestication. Westminster Review n.s. 35 (January): 207-27.   Text   Image
as having taken place, Lamarck on the other hand places his theory on a higher standpoint than that occupied by Mr. Darwin in his first essay, by the recognition of a general law governing the whole of the changes assumed by him, a deficiency in his theory which is supplied by Mr. Darwin in the work now under consideration, by his hypothesis of Pangenesis, to which we shall have to advert hereafter. Another objection to Darwinism, and one which presses with great force on the minds of those who
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A65    Review:     Anon. 1868. [Review of] Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication. Atlantic Monthly. 22 (Issue 129, July): 122-124.   Text   Image
leave it unread. It would be impossible, in the short space at our command, to convey the gist of it to the reader, nor would an abstract be of much value, apart from the special evidence. Still, as every one has heard more or less about Darwinism, and many people have a most inaccurate notion of the contents of that mysterious expression, we will subjoin a brief account of a single factor in Mr. Darwin's reasoning. It will give to the unlearned reader a slight idea of the kind of speculation
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A887    Review:     Pye-Smith, P.H. 1871. [Review of Descent.] Nature 3 (6 April): 443-445; (part 2): (13 April): 463-465.   Text   Image
of Abiogenesis has recently been discussed, the reticence shown in avoiding allusion to the subject is perhaps the most remarkable among the many remarkable characters of this great work. P. H. PYE-SMITH ... Essays on Darwinism. By J. R. R. Stebbing. (Longmans and Co., 1871.) MR. DARWIN, in his recent work, very truly observes that false facts are highly injurious to the progress of science, for they often long endure; but that false theories are comparatively innocuous. Mr. Stebbing's work
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A1175    Review:     Ripley, G. 1871. [Review of] Descent of man: Darwinism. Appleton's Journal, 5, (25 March): 350-2.   Text   PDF
The Complete Work of Charles Darwin Online [page] 350 DARWINISM. THE great interest excited by Mr. Darwin's latest work, The Descent of Man, induces us to copy, from the New York Tribune, the following clear and concise summary of its argument, and of Darwinism generally, written by Mr. George Ripley: Not a little curiosity bas been awakened with regard to the contents of the present work, the purpose of which is to apply the principles of Natural Selection to the explanation of the origin or
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A1177    Review:     Anon. 1871. [Review of] The descent of man. The Daily Evening Telegraph (Philadelphia), (17 March), p.6.   Text   PDF
a more promising member of society than some of the humans with whom we are acquainted, and might put to shame some of his presumably more intellectual relatives. Mr. Darwin's theories with regard to natural selection have been adopted by many of the scientific men of the present day, and the arguments and facts contained in the volume before us will tend to confirm the believers in Darwinism, even if they do not convert its opponents. Whatever opinions may be held with regard to Mr. Darwin's
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A1176    Review:     Anon. 1871. [Review of] The descent of man. The Chicago Tribune (9 April), p.1.   Text   PDF
, as inexplicable as the reign of life over organized beings Whence  come life and law? Darwinism may trace some of their effects. But these two great causes remain as mysterious as ever, or, in the religious sense, as manifest as ever the soul of God in nature. Whatever will explain the existence will not only clear up the process of creation, but all the problems of our spiritual being. The truly scientific position which every writer on cosmogony and physical science should assume, is taken
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A1176    Review:     Anon. 1871. [Review of] The descent of man. The Chicago Tribune (9 April), p.1.   Text   PDF
, as inexplicable as the reign of life over organized beings Whence come life and law? Darwinism may trace some of their effects. But these two great causes remain as mysterious as ever, or, in the religious sense, as manifest as ever the soul of God in nature. Whatever will explain the existence will not only clear up the process of creation, but all the problems of our spiritual being. The truly scientific position which every writer on cosmogony and physical science should assume, is taken by
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A69    Review:     Mivart, St. George Jackson. 1871. [Review of] The Descent of Man, and selection in relation to sex. Quarterly Review. 131 (July): 47-90.   Text   Image
intellect, combined with an extraordinarily active imagination, to an unequalled collection of most varied, interesting and important biological data. In his earlier writings a certain reticence veiled, though it did not hide, his ultimate conclusions as to the origin of our own species; but now all possibility of misunderstanding or of a repetition of former disclaimers on the part of any disciple is at an end, and the entire and naked truth as to the logical consequences of Darwinism is displayed
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A59    Review:     Adams, L. T. 1874. Mr. Darwin and the theory of natural selection. New Englander (Issue 129, October) 33: 741-770.   Text   Image
His first hint here came from a work, nearly obsolete not so many years ago, but now returning to celebrity on the flood tide of Darwinism, the Essay of Malthus on the Principles of Population. It is certain that all living beings multiply in a geometrical progression, with a varying ratio which, however, is high in the slowest breeders. The successive additions of each generation to the numbers of any race would suffice, if unchecked, to stock the whole world in a few centuries, or even in
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A59    Review:     Adams, L. T. 1874. Mr. Darwin and the theory of natural selection. New Englander (Issue 129, October) 33: 741-770.   Text   Image
It is impossible to reflect upon these and other great uniformities of the living world without the suspicion that Darwinism is an incomplete induction; that back of the phenomena it deals with there resides in organic beings some power which is the principal factor involved, which has controlled all the secondary causes and laws of variability and has probably originated variation itself. This after all is the weak point of the new philosophy, that it refuses to offer any explanation of the
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A2775    Review:     Anon. 1878. [Review of Expression]. Cosmos les Mondes 46: 55.   Text   PDF
considérations nouvelles l'hypothése de l'évolution et de la descendance de l'homme d'une forme animale, et il s'applaudit d'avoir réussi. Que bien lui en fasse. Mais l'évolution a déjà assez évolué elle-méme pour étre bientot arrivée à l'absurde! [In his article: Darwinism and the expression of emotions in man, Father Lecomte exposes as best he can the three hazardous sources that the illustrious English naturalist assigns to the mimic expression of emotions: the association of useful habits
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A2502    Review:     Anon. 1880. [Review of Erasmus]. American Journal of Science and Arts, 109-114 (January-June): 250-251. [Silliman's Journal].   Text
Company). – The first half of this work contain a life of Dr. Darwin by his grandson, and the remainder is devoted to a discussion of his scientific works by Krause. The book will be read with appreciation by many, both in view of the interest which attaches to the general history of the Theory of Development, and because it shows how far the habits of thought of the older naturalist have descended to the grandson who has given his name to Darwinism
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A116    Review:     Anon. 1868. [Review of] The Variation of animals and plants under domestication. The American Naturalist 2 (10) (December) 547-553.   Text   Image
latitude is given, the varying forms thus supposed to have a common ancestry are strong supporters of Darwin, and his laws of inherited variability. It is, perhaps, this uncertainty, and the desire of almost all minds of the nineteenth century, to look for secondary causes, whose modes of action may be determined by experiment, rather than to refer to the direct interposition of the Creator, that has caused so many converts to Darwinism. The present volumes are, besides their value to the
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A2428    Review:     Anon. 1884. [Review of the Essay on instinct]. Vermont Chronicle (16 May): 4.   Text
known as Darwinism. The author assumes, as the basis of his discussion, the truth of the general theory of evolution. Starting with that hypothesis it is, of course, a comparatively easy matter to follow out the theory in its application to the development of the mental faculties. For sale by Phinney
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A2098    Review:     Danilevskii, Nikolai. 1885. [Review of Origin] Vvedenie. Darvinizm, Kriticheskoe issledovanie ["Introduction." Darwinism, A Critical Investigation] 1, St. Petersburg, pp. 44-82. Translated by Stephen M. Woodburn.   Text   PDF
The Complete Work of Charles Darwin Online [Danilevskii]                 The necessity of an open inquiry into the teachings of Darwin. What the name Darwinism means. It is a particular philosophical worldview. The accidental trait as the highest universal principle. Darwinism is the only possible support of the materialistic worldview, even though Darwin himself was a deist. The dual problem of his teaching. The elimination of teleology is the main reason for the success of Darwin's theory
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