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F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
consideration of the biological problem of species with which geological facts are so interwoven. Fossil marine shells, fossilised bones and teeth of mammals, petrified trees all these were clues in the great detective story; and all led the way for a direct reconsideration of species problems as viewed by one brought up on the creationist assumption. But now we return to Valparaiso, to Mr. Corfield's house, and are glad to think that his kind friend had seen to it that on the rocky traverse he was to be
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F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
passed, FitzRoy became more and more a passionate believer in the literal truth of the first chapters of Genesis, whilst Darwin's thoughts were fixed on the vast geological ages, far out-spanning the time therein allotted to the creation of the world. Would not FitzRoy's over-emphasis on the creationist point of view have drawn Darwin to a closer scrutiny of the whole question? Possibly his allegiance to his old friend may even have helped to delay the publication of all the accumulated evidence in
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F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
to obtain all available evidence that hardly a sign of such an upheaval of beliefs found its way into print even ten years later in Murray's first popular edition of the Journal of Researches in 1845. Probably there was some deference to FitzRoy's emphatically creationist opinions in this delay; but mostly the need in his own mind to marshall all the facts in logical sequence. In 1845 he still refers to Centres of Creation , and aboriginal creations . I have found in one of the Ornithological
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F1571    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1945. Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle. London: Pilot Press.   Text   Image   PDF
, 13, 49, 113, 121, 127, 128, 139, 146 Shropshire, 142 Simon's Bay, 141 Slavery, 36, 161 2 Smith, Dr. Andrew, 254 South America, 108, 116, 119, 120, 122, 125, 144 5, 179 , western coast, 223 4, 238 South Seas, 122 Spanish delay, 213 , ladies, 78, 168 St. Helena, 136 7, 254, 257, 260 St. Jago (Santiago), 107, 115, 118, 226, 228 Species, creationist doctrines, 1 , immutability of, 1 , geographical ranges of, 177 9, 185, 262 , problems of, 239, 246, 259 Stokes, John Lort, Mate and Assistant Surveyor
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F1577    Periodical contribution:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1963. Darwin's ornithological notes. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Historical Series 2 (7): 201-278. With introduction, notes and appendix by the editor.   Text   Image   PDF
Ornithological Notes. It is worth noting how the terms creation and centres of creation are still retained in B. 1845 a comment often made by others. But it has not, I think, been noted that the creationist passages centering round his Galapagos experiences, originated earlier in the discussion on the ranges of bird distribution, see B. 1839, p. 353; B. 1845, p. 289; Ornithological Notes MS. p. 69 and Appendix. As Sir Gavin de Beer has pointed out in the Evolutionary Notebooks (Bull. B.M. (N.H.)), Darwin had
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F1555    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species, a sketch written in 1842. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
suggest that many of the forms might have been borne from nearest land, but if peculiar, he calls in creationist, as such island rises in height c., he still more calls in creation. The creationist tells one, on a illegible spot the American spirit of creation makes Orpheus and Tyrannus and American doves, and in accordance with past and extinct forms, but no persistent relation between areas and distribution, Geologico-Geograph.-Distribution. 1 The following is written on the back of a page of
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
suggest that many of the forms might have been borne from nearest land, but if peculiar, he calls in creationist,—as such island rises in height c., he still more calls in creation. The creationist tells one, on a illegible spot the American spirit of creation makes Orpheus and Tyrannus and American doves, and in accordance with past and extinct forms, but no persistent relation between areas and distribution, Geologico-Geograph.-Distribution. 1 The following is written on the back of a page of
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F1555    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species, a sketch written in 1842. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
are probably subject to many the same contagious diseases; if domesticated these forms would vary, and they might possibly breed together, and fuse into something1 different from their aboriginal forms; might be selected to serve different ends. Now the Creationist believes these three Rhinoceroses were created2 with their deceptive appearance of true, not illegible relationship; as well can I believe the planets revolve in their present courses not from one law of gravity but from distinct
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F1555    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species, a sketch written in 1842. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
the Creationist in the case of a species, must believe that one act of creation is absorbed into another! CONCLUSION. Such are my reasons for believing that specific forms are not immutable. The affinity of different groups, the unity of types of structure, the representative forms through which f tus passes, the metamorphosis of organs, the abortion of others cease to be metaphorical expressions and become intelligible facts. We no longer look an on animal as a savage does at a ship2, or other
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
are probably subject to many the same contagious diseases; if domesticated these forms would vary, and they might possibly breed together, and fuse into something1 different from their aboriginal forms; might be selected to serve different ends. Now the Creationist believes these three Rhinoceroses were created2 with their deceptive appearance of true, not illegible relationship; as well can I believe the planets revolve in their present courses not from one law of gravity but from distinct
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
the Creationist in the case of a species, must believe that one act of creation is absorbed into another! CONCLUSION. Such are my reasons for believing that specific forms are not immutable. The affinity of different groups, the unity of types of structure, the representative forms through which fœtus passes, the metamorphosis of organs, the abortion of others cease to be metaphorical expressions and become intelligible facts. We no longer look an on animal as a savage does at a ship2, or other
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Looking further backwards we see that the past geographical distribution of organic beings was different from the present; and indeed, considering that geology shows that all our land was once under water, and that where water now extends land is forming, the reverse could hardly have been possible. Now these several facts, though evidently all more or less connected together, must by the creationist (though the geologist may explain some of the anomalies) be considered as so many ultimate
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Origin, Ed. i., Ch. XIV Ed. vi. begins with a similar statement. In the present Essay the author adds a note:— The obviousness of the fact i.e. the natural grouping of organisms alone prevents it being remarkable. It is scarcely explicable by creationist: groups of aquatic, of vegetable feeders and carnivorous, c., might resemble each other; but why as it is. So with plants,—analogical resemblance thus accounted for. Must not here enter into details. This argument is incorporated with the text in
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
in a considerable degree explained, on the theory of descent, although inexplicable on the views of the creationist. Practically, naturalists seem to classify according to the resemblance of those parts or organs which in related groups are most uniform, or vary least2: thus the æstivation, or manner in which the petals etc. are folded over each other, is found to afford an unvarying character in most families of plants, and accordingly any difference in this respect would be sufficient to cause
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F1555    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species, a sketch written in 1842. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
not drawn by physiologists, and is only implied by some by their general manner of writing. These facts, though affecting every organic being on the face of the globe, which has existed, or does exist, can only be viewed by the Creationist as ultimate and inexplicable facts. But this unity of type through the individuals of a group, and this metamorphosis of the same organ into other organs, adapted to diverse use, necessarily follows on the theory of descent2. For let us take case of Vertebrata
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
not drawn by physiologists, and is only implied by some by their general manner of writing. These facts, though affecting every organic being on the face of the globe, which has existed, or does exist, can only be viewed by the Creationist as ultimate and inexplicable facts. But this unity of type through the individuals of a group, and this metamorphosis of the same organ into other organs, adapted to diverse use, necessarily follows on the theory of descent2. For let us take case of Vertebrata
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F1556    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1909. The foundations of The origin of species. Two essays written in 1842 and 1844. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
the Vertebrata the limbs were metamorphosed spinal processes, and that in all the species throughout the class the limbs displayed a unity of type1. These wonderful parts of the hoof, foot, hand, wing, paddle, both in living and extinct animals, being all constructed on the same framework, and again of the petals, stamina, germens, c. being metamorphosed leaves, can by the creationist be viewed only as ultimate facts and incapable of explanation; whilst on our theory of descent these facts all
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CUL-DAR205.9.185-187    Note:    1844.03.20   Prof Forbes says he thinks that all Gasteropods pass through state of   Text   Image
outside, then in middle of the bed all with rougher outside then at top all with very protuberant roughness. Most wonderful On common Creationist view, one must look at this roughness as some relation or effect, like the colouring of insects in the Phillippines, shows the external influences do produce some marked effects. There is no gradation between their forms but if there had been a gradual change, there sets suddenly seized preserved, effect would be this Grand case Forbes tells me bed
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F1725    Periodical contribution:     [Darwin, C. R.] 1863. [Review of] Contributions to an insect fauna of the Amazon Valley. By Henry Walter Bates, Esq. Transact. Linnean Soc. Vol. XXIII. 1862, p. 495. Natural History Review 3 (April): 219-224.   Text   Image   PDF
By what means, it may be asked, have so many butterflies of the Amazonian region acquired their deceptive dress? Most naturalists will answer that they were thus clothed from the hour of their creation—an answer which will generally be so far triumphant that it can be met only by long-drawn arguments; but it is made at the expence of putting an effectual bar to all further inquiry. In this particular case, moreover, the creationist will meet with special difficulties; for many of the mimicking
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CUL-DAR140.3.1--159    Draft:    [1884]   'Reminiscences of My Father's Everyday Life' (partial fair copy)   Text   Image
can be classed as a breaking of 2 1 In the sixth edition of Origin, Darwin added two thousand new sentences to his argument, including a chapter devoted to the refutation of Mivart's counter. A member of the creationist camp, Mivart had published Genesis of Species in which he attacked evolutionary theory. One of Mivart's arguments most threatening to Darwin's theory was the futility he saw in partially evolved organs. Why would an insect evolve wings if the organ, in developmental form, would
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F1452.2    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1887. The life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapter. vol. 2. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
that I cannot explain why one rat has a longer tail and another longer ears, c. But he seems to muddle in assuming that these parts did not all vary together, or one part so insensibly before the other, as to be in fact contemporaneous. I might ask the creationist whether he thinks these differences in the two rats of any use, or as standing in some relation from laws of growth; and if he admits this, selection might come into play. He who thinks that God created animals unlike for mere sport
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F1452.3    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1887. The life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapter. vol. 3. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
seems to me hardly more difficult to understand precisely and in detail than the former case of supposed change. Bronn may ask in vain, the old creationist school and the new school, why one mouse has longer ears than another mouse, and one plant more pointed leaves than another plant. [page] 2
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F1452.2    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1887. The life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapter. vol. 2. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
creationist will meet with special difficulties; for many of the mimicking forms of Leptalis can be shown by a graduated series to be merely [page] 39
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F1452.2    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1887. The life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapter. vol. 2. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
creationist will have to admit that some of these forms have become imitators, by means of the laws of variation, whilst others he must look at as separately created under their present guise; he will further have to admit that some have been created in imitation of forms not themselves created as we now see them, but due to the laws of variation! Prof. Agassiz, indeed, would think nothing of this difficulty; for he believes that not only each species and each variety, but that groups of individuals
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A336    Book:     Gray, Asa. 1888. Darwiniana: Essays and reviews pertaining to Darwinism. New York: D. Appleton.   Text   Image   PDF
INSECTIVOROUS PLANTS. 307 depends. These take it instead of making it, to a certain extent. What is the bearing of these remarkable adaptations and operations upon doctrines of evolution ? There seems here to be a field on which the specific creationist, the evolutionist with design, and the necessary evolutionist, may fight out an interesting, if not decisive, triangular duel. [page break
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A336    Book:     Gray, Asa. 1888. Darwiniana: Essays and reviews pertaining to Darwinism. New York: D. Appleton.   Text   Image   PDF
ATTITUDE OF WORKIKG XATUEALISTS. 217 much occasion to employ his capacity for generalization. upon the accumulated facts in their bearing upon the problem of the origin of species; since the special creationist,5' who maintains that they were supernaturally originated just as they are, by the very terms of his doctrine places them out of the reach of scientific explanation. Again, when one reflects upon the new impetus which the derivative hypothesis has given to systematic natural history
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F1461    Book:     Darwin, Francis ed. 1892. Charles Darwin: his life told in an autobiographical chapter, and in a selected series of his published letters [abridged edition]. London: John Murray.   Text   Image   PDF
creationist's point of view: By what means, it may be asked, have so many butterflies of the Amazonian region acquired their deceptive dress? Most naturalists will answer that they were thus clothed from the hour of their creation an answer which will generally be so far triumphant that it can be met only by long-drawn arguments; but it is made at the expense of putting an effectual bar to all further inquiry. In this particular case, moreover, the creationist will meet with special difficulties
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A162    Book:     Seward, A. C. ed. 1909. Darwin and modern science. Essays in commemoration of the centenary of the birth of Charles Darwin and of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of The origin of species. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
increase, and one of the most remarkable, as also most independent champions of the evolution-idea before that date was Herbert Spencer, who not only marshalled the arguments in a very forcible way in 1852, but applied the formula in detail in his Principles of Psychology in 18552. It is right and proper that we should shake ourselves free from all creationist appreciations of Darwin, and that we should recognise the services of pre-Darwinian evolutionists who helped to make the time ripe, yet
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A874    Book:     Huxley, Leonard. 1921. Charles Darwin. London: Watts.   Text   Image   PDF
a creationist until converted, a score of years later, by the Origin itself. The discoverer had to build anew. It was evident that the many facts he had observed on the voyage could only be explained on the supposition that species had been gradually modified. But it was equally evident that neither the action of the environment nor the will of the organisms, especially in the case of plants, could account for the innumerable and beautiful adaptations of organisms to their habits of life
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F1566    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1933. Charles Darwin's diary of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
Beagle.† Darwin's manuscript was ready for the publisher in 1837, but there was a delay of two years due to FitzRoy's ill-health. EVOLUTIONARY VIEWS The growth of Darwin's evolutionary beliefs has been frequently discussed. Francis Darwin devotes the opening pages of vol. ii of Life and Letters to the question, and deals with it again in his Introduction to the Foundations of the Origin of Species.‡ We know that Darwin left England in 1831 with unshaken belief in immutability and the creationist
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F1566    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1933. Charles Darwin's diary of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
some of their later discussions after expeditions made in common, evidence of which can be found in their parallel accounts, must sometimes have led Darwin nearer the truth by FitzRoy's overstatement of the creationist point of view. Such discussions must have helped to form opinions, but it may well be that overt expression was delayed by Darwin's very real affection and admiration for Robert FitzRoy. FitzRoy has never received the recognition that is his due. It is true that later he was
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F1566    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1933. Charles Darwin's diary of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
creationist theory is definitely emphasized in 1845. (47) p. 342. In the small diaries we find: Whaler gave us water—extraordinary kindness of Yankeys . (48) p. 351. Hibiscus tiliaceous. Added in first and second editions. (49) p. 357. It will probably be published is erased, and so interesting an account has been given by Capt. FitzRoy substituted. This proves that deletions were made after Darwin had read FitzRoy's account. See Voyages of A. and B. vol. ii, p. 516. [page] 439 NOTE
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F2112    Periodical contribution:     Barlow, Nora. 1935. Charles Darwin and the Galapagos Islands. Nature 136 (7 September): 391.   Text
discernible in the different editions of Voyage of the Beagle . Even in the second edition of 1845, the words creation and creative force are used in the Galapagos discussion in the traditional sense. Darwin took no pleasure in overthrowing preconceived doctrines; he entered the new road cautiously, determined to pave it with solid accumulated evidence. Probably a certain deference to Capt. FitzRoy's views, emphatically creationist, helped to delay the unfolding of Darwin's divergent opinions. In
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A86    Periodical contribution:     Sulloway, Frank J. 1982. The Beagle collections of Darwin's finches (Geospizinae). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Zoology Series 43, no. 2: 49-94.   Text   Image   PDF
In short, Darwin does not appear to have altered his collecting or labelling practices while he was in the Galapagos Archipelago. After he left Charles Island, his collecting procedures continued to reflect the typological and creationist assumptions he had brought with him to that archipelago. What localities he did record were noted as largely incidental information to remind himself later of scarce species or noteworthy habitats. He continued, moreover, to collect only a few specimens of
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A587    Book:     Armstrong, Patrick. 1985. Charles Darwin in Western Australia: A young scientist's perception of an environment. Nedlands: University of Western Australia Press.   Text
seems that even by the time he reached Australia, he was still, in part of his mind at least, a creationist,64 although he was trying to reconcile the facts that he had been accumulating for the previous four years with conventional doctrine. [January 19 1836, Near Walerawang, New South Wales] I had been lying on a sunny bank, and was reflecting on the strange character of the animals of this country as compared to the rest of the world. An unbeliever in everything beyond his own reason might
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A587    Book:     Armstrong, Patrick. 1985. Charles Darwin in Western Australia: A young scientist's perception of an environment. Nedlands: University of Western Australia Press.   Text
63. For a full exposition of these ideas and their relevance to Darwin's thinking, see Dov Ospovat. The Development of Darwin's Theory: Natural History, Natural Theology, Natural Selection, 1838-1859, Cambridge University Press, 1981, and more briefly, Howard Gruber and Paul Barrett, Darwin on Man, London, Wildwood House, 1974. 64. Albeit a creationist of an unusual kind, for he had by then absorbed the doctrines of uniformitarian geology see page 52. 65. Darwin and Henslow (footnote 2
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A588    Book:     Armstrong, Patrick. 1991. Under the blue vault of heaven: A study of Charles Darwin's sojourn in the Cocos (Keeling) Islands. Nedlands: Indian Ocean Centre for Peace Studies.   Text
particularly novel idea. It is stressed in Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology3, a copy of each of the three volumes of which Darwin had with him in the poop cabin of HMS Beagle. (Ironically one of these was gifted and signed by FitzRoy, who in later years was to make himself appear ridiculous by adhering to fundamentalist and extreme creationist views long after they had largely been discarded by others.) A little surprisingly Lyell writes particularly fluently about the relationship that exists
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A589    Book:     Armstrong, Patrick. 1992. Darwin's desolate islands: A naturalist in the Falklands, 1833 and 1834. Chippenham: Picton Publishing.   Text
saw East Falkland influenced his thinking on the environment. Psychological or quasi-psychological studies of how individuals, especially notable artists and scientists saw the world are not unusual. Indeed Howard Gruber developed a model11 of how Darwin's view of the world changed over time from traditional creationist to evolutionist; Dov Ospovat's brilliant analysis of 198112 had similar objectives. From a content analysis (an examination of the frequency of certain words and ideas), of
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A339    Periodical contribution:     Armstrong, Patrick. 2002. Antlions: A link between Charles Darwin and an early Suffolk naturalist. Transactions of the Suffolk Natural History Society 38: 81-86.   Text   Image
William Kirby (1759-1850) Suffolk Rector, entomologist and botanist. From the frontispiece of volume III of Introduction to Entomology. signify a Creationist, Deistic approach, reflecting Genesis chapter 1; the final words the Creator rested in his labor echoing the words of Genesis, 2, vv. 2-3. Darwin used capitals for many nouns. Nicholas and Nicholas (1989) hint at the possibility that all this was a religious disguise, as the Diary was partly written for his family (especially his sisters
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A622    Periodical contribution:     Ghiselin, Michael T. 2009. Darwin: A reader's guide. Occasional Papers of the California Academy of Sciences (155 [12 February]), 185 pp, 3 figs.   Text   PDF
course, a creationist and continued to oppose evolution throughout his life. References: Tort in DD, Fletcher 1893. Magendie, Fran oisOctober 6, 1783 October 7, 1855 Bordeaux, France Sannois, France French physiologist. Darwin mentions his cruel experiments in a letter on vivisection to the Times. References: Grmek in DSB Malthus, [Thomas] Robert (The Reverend)February 13, 1766 December 23, 1834 Near Guilford Surry, England Bath, England English economist, the first professor of that subject. As
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A622    Periodical contribution:     Ghiselin, Michael T. 2009. Darwin: A reader's guide. Occasional Papers of the California Academy of Sciences (155 [12 February]), 185 pp, 3 figs.   Text   PDF
, the island might gradually disappear and nothing but coral would be left. Later on in the voyage Darwin was able to test this theory by observations on coral formations at Tahiti and, more importantly, at Keeling Atoll in the Indian Ocean. By his own accounts published much later, Darwin did not become an evolutionist during the voyage, though he began to think seriously about such matters. He was still a creationist both before and for some time after his famous visit to the Galapagos
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A622    Periodical contribution:     Ghiselin, Michael T. 2009. Darwin: A reader's guide. Occasional Papers of the California Academy of Sciences (155 [12 February]), 185 pp, 3 figs.   Text   PDF
: Princeton University Press, p. 683-729. Cosans, Chris, 2005. Was Darwin a creationist? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, v. 48, p. 362-371. Coulter, John M., 1909. The theory of natural selection from the standpoint of botany, in Anonymous, ed., Fifty Years of Darwinism: Modern Aspects of Evolution, Centennial Addresses in Honor of Charles Darwin before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Baltimore, Friday, January 1, 1909. New York: Henry Holt and Company, p. 57-71
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A690    Periodical contribution:     Wyhe, John van. 2010. 'Almighty God! what a wonderful discovery!': Did Charles Darwin really believe life came from space? Endeavour 34, no. 3, (September): 95-103.   Text
famous scientist60 it was published in a respectable popular science magazine and repeated internationally in more than a score of periodicals and books. It spread somewhat, but without a more substantial number of extraterrestrial life advocates, or others whose views would stand to gain from such a revelation at the time, this legend did not enjoy the conditions needed to sustain and further propagate it. Whereas the Darwin deathbed conversion legend met a creationist audience whose beliefs
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