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EHBeagleDiary    Note:    1831.00.00--1836.00.00   Beagle diary   Text
Buenos Ayres 1832 Octob: 31st A beautiful day: but the wind has been steadily against us. — In the evening all the ropes were coated fringed with Gossamer web. — I caught some of the Aeronaut spiders, which must have come at least 60 miles: How inexplicable is the cause which induces these small insects, as it now appears in both hemispheres, to undertake their aerial excursions. — Novemb. 1st A calm delightful day. — I know not the reason why such days always lead the mind to think of England
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F1925    Book:     Keynes, Richard Darwin ed. 2001. Charles Darwin's Beagle Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
31st A beautiful day: but the wind has been steadily against us. In the evening all the ropes were coated fringed with Gossamer web. I caught some of the Aeronaut spiders which must have come at least 60 miles. How inexplicable is the cause which induces these small insects, as it now appears in both hemispheres, to undertake their aerial excursions. November 1st A calm delightful day. I know not the reason why such days always lead the mind to think of England and home. It would seem as if
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F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
little spider on its thread. The circumstance of spiders of the same species but of different sexes and ages, being found on several occasions at the distance of many leagues from the [page] 189 Dec. 1833. AERONAUT SPIDERS
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F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
in, Gauchos riding, feats with lazo Toxodon Armadillo-like gigantic covering Great tail Return to Monte Video Character of inhabitants . . . . . . 167 CHAPTER IX. Rio Plata Flocks of butterflies Beetles alive in the sea Aeronaut spiders Pelagic animals Phosphorescence of sea Port Desire Spanish settlements Zoology Guanaco Excursion to head of harbour Indian grave Port St. Julian Geology of Patagonia, successive terraces, transport of pebbles Fossil gigantic llama Types of organization constant
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F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
CHAPTER IX. Rio Plata Flocks of butterflies Beetles alive in the sea Aeronaut spiders Pelagic animals Phosphorescence of sea Port Desire Spanish settlements Zoology Guanaco Excursion to head of harbour Indian grave Port St. Julian Geology of Patagonia, successive terraces, transport of pebbles Fossil gigantic llama Types of organization constant Change in zoology of America Causes of extinction. PATAGONIA. DECEMBER 6TH, 1833. The Beagle sailed from the Rio Plata, never again to enter its muddy
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F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
land, attached in vast numbers to the lines, proves that they are the manufacturers of the mesh, and that the habit of sailing through the air, is probably as characteristic of some tribe, as that of diving is of the Argyroneta. We may then reject Latreille's supposition, that the gossamer owes its origin to the webs of the young of several genera, as Epeira or Thomisa: although, as we have seen that the young of other spiders do possess the power of performing aerial voyages.* During our
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F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
the * Lyell's Geology, vol. iii., p. 63. [page] 187 Dec. 1833. AERONAUT SPIDERS
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F10.3    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1839. Narrative of the surveying voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle between the years 1826 and 1836, describing their examination of the southern shores of South America, and the Beagle's circumnavigation of the globe. Journal and remarks. 1832-1836. London: Henry Colburn.   Text   Image   PDF
to be produced by the entanglement of the single threads. The spiders were all of one species, but of both sexes, together with young ones. These latter were distinguished by their smaller size, and more dusky colour. I will not give the description of this spider, but merely state that it does not appear to me to be included in any of Latreille's genera. The little aeronaut as soon as it arrived on board, was very active, running about; sometimes letting itself fall, and then reascending the
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F20    Book:     Darwin, C. R. 1860. Journal of researches into the natural history and geology of the countries visited during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle round the world, under the command of Capt. Fitz Roy R.N. London: John Murray. Tenth thousand. Final text.   Text   Image
performing the above preparatory steps, connected its legs together with the most delicate threads, but I am not sure whether this observation was correct. One day, at St. F , I had a better opportunity of observing some similar facts. A spider which was about three-tenths of an inch in length, and which in its general appearance resembled a Citigrade (therefore quite different from the gossamer), while standing on the summit of a post, darted forth four or five threads [page] 161 AERONAUT SPIDERS
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F1765    Periodical contribution:     Darwin, C. R. 1873. Aeronaut spiders. Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette no. 40 (4 October): 1437.   Text   Image   PDF
Darwin, C. R. 1873. Aeronaut spiders. Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette No. 40 (4 October): 1437. [page] 1437 Aeronaut Spiders. — If your correspondent H. K. has an opportunity of perusing the volume of Darwin's Naturalist's Voyage Round the World in H.M.S. Beagle, he will find much there to amuse him in the way of aëronaut spiders. One or two quotations out of many from Mr. Darwin's book will be sufficient to substantiate the correctness of H. K.'s observations:— December, 1833
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F1566    Book:     Barlow, Nora ed. 1933. Charles Darwin's diary of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle. Cambridge: University Press.   Text   Image   PDF
APPENDIX II References to the longer and more important passages, not found in the present text, added by Darwin on publication. Murray's second edition used; pagination similar to the later editions of 1860 and 1870. Preface. p. 4... Falling of fine dust. Geology. Zoology. St Jago. p. 14... Discoloured sea. p. 26... Planariae, phosphorescent insects. p. 33... Butterflies, ants, spiders. p. 49... Zoology. Maldonado. p. 81... Extinct quadrupeds. p. 89... Birds, mammals, snakes, Zoophytes. p
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